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Alternatives to Bad Credit Loans

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Alternatives to Bad Credit Loans

Don’t be discouraged if you are able to get due to your weak credit rating and you think that there’s no other choice to pay for every financial commitment. In the darkest of times, there is a bright aspect.

These are some of the best methods to obtain the money you require: basic condition

Personal Loans

Individual lenders and third-party lenders can offer these loans online. They typically provide loans to individuals who are unable to charge their own credit and can do it in a matter of minutes. The loans can be paid in installments, much the same as bank loans.

They are increasingly sought-after by those with weak credit because they do not require any type of security especially when they’re supported by high-interest rates than the internet and credit. For short-term loans, it is possible to connect with these lenders online and then call these lenders directly.

In the event that the credit scores are higher than average, you will be able to pay less on the loan if the credit scores are lower than typical. But, the rates of these loans tend to be lower than the rates offered by banks that charge higher interest rates.

Beforehand by Credit Cards

It’s only one of the alternatives accessible to bad credit loans. Most of the time, you use credit cards to buy all the things you need and then pay back the full people with bad credit amounts later. But what is the best option if you badly needed urgent cash?

A bank will be allowing you to use cash credit in certain situations. Also instead of having to buy access funds, banks can give you cash to pay for costs.

Modify

If you have important possessions like jewelry, as an example, they’re worth selling or trading for, you can make the money you require swiftly. This could be the best option. It is unlikely to create problems when you stay clear of options that aren’t practical.

Borrow from Family Members

You can request your family and friends for a loan of a reasonable amount. Don’t think that it’s a given you’re borrowing funds from relatives or your close friends. Be sure to carry all conditions and terms, including your interest rates, the number of installments, and any additional charges (if appropriate).

If you have taken out a loan through an institution that is traditional, make sure that you have it from members of the family and also friends. Be aware that if you do not comply with the terms of your agreement you possibility of losing your friendship and that’s something you do not want to occur.

Greece opens competition for 28 state-funded remote island air routes

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Greek authorities this week announced a competition for airlines interested in covering 28 state-funded domestic routes to remote islands.

Airlines operating in the EU can submit their offers before September 25, 2022, said the Hellenic Civil Aviation Authority.

Successful companies will be subsidized by the State with a maximum amount of 18.18 million euros (excluding taxes) for each year. This is the first time that a single call for tenders concerns all remote island links.

The airlines that won the contracts will operate as follows domestic routes from February 1, 2023 to January 31, 2027:

Athens – Astypalaia, Athens – Ikaria, Athens – Skiathos, Athens – Kythera, Athens – Karpathos, Athens – Paros, Athens – Zakynthos, Athens – Syros, Athens – Leros, Athens – Kalymnos, Athens – Skyros, Athens – Milos, Athens – Naxos, Athens – Sitia, Athens – Kozani – Kastoria, Thessaloniki – Samos, Thessaloniki – Chios, Thessaloniki – Corfu, Thessaloniki – Kalamata – Kythira, Thessaloniki – Skyros, Thessaloniki – Limnos – Ikaria, Rhodes – Karpathos – Kasos – Sitia, Rhodes – Kastellorizo, Alexandroupoli – Sitia, Aktio – Sitia, Corfu – Aktio – Kefalonia – Zakynthos, Lemnos – Mytilini – Chios – Samos – Rhodes and Rhodes – Kos – Kalymnos – Leros – Astypalaia.

Changes this year include the addition of Kythera and Sitia, Crete.

Isolated island routes in Greece are currently operated by Greek carriers SKY express and Olympic Air (AEGEAN). SKY express operates the majority of specific routes.


Follow GTP headlines on Google News to keep up to date with all the latest news on tourism and travel in Greece.

Family businesses will organize fundraisers for worthy local causes

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August and Lily King, owners and operators of Mindemoya Munchies, and their parents Jeff and Jacqueline King, owners of Island Time Boat Rentals, will host two fundraising events this month to benefit the Manitoulin Food Bank and Manitoulin Pet Rescue. The first event, a charity hot dog barbecue, will take place this Sunday, August 7 at Mindemoya Munchies.

MINDEMOYA—Two businesses in Mindemoya, both owned by members of the same family, will hold two fundraisers (over the next two Saturdays in August) to raise funds for two very worthy local causes.

“Jeff, the children and I have been overwhelmed with the support and enthusiasm shown by our two businesses,” said Jacqueline King. “We wanted to find a way to give back to this amazing community.”

Jeff and Jacqueline King own Island Time Boat Rentals, and their children, August and Lily, own and operate Mindemoya Munchies (a concession stand across from the public dock at Lake Mindemoya). “We decided to hold a few fundraisers to help give back to the community that welcomed and supported our businesses.”

Mindemoya Munchies sells a variety of snacks and treats. They offer ice cream novelties like drumsticks, ice cream sandwiches, popsicles, and candies, as well as hot snacks like hot dogs, pogos, and pizza. They also have chocolate bars, chips, and a variety of soft drinks and Gatorade. They even have breakfast sandwiches and coffee for the Saturday morning crowd. August and Lily said they were “really thrilled because we’ve partnered with mom and dad’s business to offer hourly rentals of non-motorized boats like kayaks and stand-up paddle boards on the beach at Lake Mindemoya. .”

“We’ve spent our summers on the island all our lives,” the youngsters said. “Our father is from here and all of our family lives here so it feels like home too. Last year we spent a lot of time in the Mindemoya subdivision and walked past the empty building of the kiosk. Mom and Dad joked that we should open a store, but we don’t think they realized we might actually want to! This year we wanted to find a way to make some money and we couldn’t stop thinking about that little empty building.

“Our parents have owned their own business for a few years and this year Dad started Island Time Boat Rentals, so we wanted to see if we could run a business as well,” the youngsters said. “Mom and dad encouraged us to try. They said we would learn a lot no matter what. So far it’s been pretty good. It pretty much depends on the weather, so we always hope for warm sunny days! People are really nice and kind to us. It’s definitely been a great learning experience so far.

A Charity Hot Dog BBQ, benefiting the Manitoulin Family Resources Food Bank, will be held Sunday, August 7 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Mindemoya Munchies Booth (across from the public boat launch of Mindemoya, 10 Will-o-wisp way, Mindemoya). The barbecue hot dogs are $3 each (with sales being cash or e-transfer), with all proceeds going to the food bank. Ms King explained: “We are also collecting non-perishable food items and anyone who brings in a food donation will be entered into a draw to win fabulous prizes. Prizes so far include a paddleboard rental from Island Time Boat Rentals, a round of golf from Brookwood Brae, a fish and chips dinner from Rockin’ JJ’s Food Truck and a goodie bag from “Do you Bake?” Crave It” by Gloria McAllister and an Epicure by Lily-Faith Hore.

There will also be a bouncy castle set up for the kids at J&S Backyard Party Rentals.

On Sunday, August 14, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., a Community Bake Sale to benefit Manitoulin Pet Rescue will be held at Mindemoya Munchies. “In addition to all the delicious baked goods, we will be selling raffle tickets for a free one-day rental of our beautiful Legend 21 cruiser pontoon boat,” Ms. King said.

“We are looking for community volunteers to donate some of their amazing baked goods.” If you would like to donate baking, please contact Jacqueline King at [email protected], or call 905-736-3610. Everyone who donates baking will be entered into a draw to win fabulous prizes (same as the prize list above). The bake sale and raffle tickets will be cash only, so please go to the ATM before coming.

“Please come to Mindemoya Munchies for these events, to help us raise as much money as possible for these two amazing organizations,” Ms King added.

All the best photos of the Royal Family at the 2022 Commonwealth Games

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Etienne PondGetty Images

The Commonwealth Games are like the Olympics; held every four years, they celebrate sporting achievement across the Commonwealth. Although there are 54 nations in the Commonwealth of Nations, more than 70 teams compete. For example, the United Kingdom sends four teams: England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. (At the Olympics, these four nations all compete under Team Great Britain.)

The Games are usually a big moment for the British royal family. Queen Elizabeth has been the head of the Commonwealth since the death of her father, King George VI, and in 2018 Prince Charles was announced to succeed the queen. Queen Elizabeth is not expected to attend the Games, due to her ongoing mobility issues, but Charles will read a speech which includes a message from his mother.

Ahead of the Games, Buckingham Palace announced that many members of the Royal Family, including Prince William and Kate Middelton, “will be attending events and engagements to celebrate the Games, as well as visiting sporting venues, attend a series of fixtures and meet athletes, volunteers and support staff helping to organize the Commonwealth Games.” Also in attendance will be Prince Edward, who has served as Deputy Patron of the Commonwealth Games since 1990 and has attended to all editions of the games since Edinburgh 1986.

Here, check out all the best photos of the Royal Family at the Commonwealth Games in Birmingham.

We will update this post as the Games continue.

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Opening ceremony

Charles and Camilla arrived at the opening ceremony in Charles’ eco-friendly Aston Martin, which runs on wine! (More information about the vehicle here.)

Passing through security for a visit to the Athletes’ Village, the Prince of Wales looked a little nervous.

Here, he shares a smile with one of the performers during the festivities in honor of the opening ceremony.

Prince Charles and Camilla were greeted by Louise Martin, President of the Commonwealth Games Federation.

Camilla opted for a sailor-inspired jumpsuit for the event.

Prince Charles delivered a speech at the opening ceremony. In this photo, you can see her youngest brother, Prince Edward, looking on with a smile.

Buckingham Palace previously announced that Prince Charles would represent his mother at the event as she continues to have episodic mobility issues.

“Over the years, bringing so many people together for the ‘Friendly Games’ has created memorable shared experiences, established long-standing relationships and even created friendly rivalries. Most importantly, they remind us of our bond with each other. others, wherever we may be in the world, as part of the Commonwealth family of nations,” Prince Charles said in his speech. “Tonight, in the words of the founder of the Games, we let’s once again embark on a new adventure here in Birmingham, a pioneering city that has attracted and embraced so many throughout its history. It is a city symbolic of the rich diversity and unity of the Commonwealth, and which now welcomes you all in friendship.”

“I wish every athlete and team much success. Your hard work and dedication, especially in recent times, has been an inspiration to us all. It is now my greatest pleasure to declare the 22nd Games open Commonwealth.”

Prince Edward and Sophie shared a laugh as they watched the ceremony.

Sophie chose a rich jewel-toned dress for the event. She and Prince Edward looked quite tanned after their recent holiday in Corfu.

July 29

The Wessexes returned for the first official day of the Games to watch the rugby sevens competition alongside Princess Anne and her husband Sir Tim Laurence.

Sophie opted for a vibrant printed dress for the appearance.

July 30

The Duke and Duchess of Gloucester attended the track cycling competition.

August 1

The whole Wessex family was present for the third day of competition.

Lady Louise has joined the heart jewelry trend.

The Countess of Wessex took some photos on her iPhone.

Sophie and James have been extremely involved in badminton competition.

August 2nd

Once again the whole Wessex team showed up at the Commonwealth Games together.

The Wessexes and the Cambridges sat in two rows to watch the swim sets.

It was the young princess’s first solo outing with her parents.

Kate pointed something out to her daughter as they sat in the stands.

Even the royal family isn’t immune to taking an awkward family photo.

They didn’t care about the photos as they cheered on the contestants.

After the swim, the Cambridges visited a SportsAid home.

Princess Charlotte took part in an interactive learning experience during the visit.

Charlotte posed for a group photo with her parents.

Afterwards, they attended a field hockey game.

And Princess Charlotte also encouraged gymnasts.

Kate, William and Charlotte all had big smiles on their faces.

The Cambridges were given plush versions of the Commonwealth Games mascot.

The Countess of Wessex and her daughter, Lady Louise, met the England hockey team after the game.

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La Repubblica reveals 5 “unknown” travel destinations in Greece

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Island of Tinos, Greece. Photo © Maria Théofanopoulou

The Italian daily The Republic recently published an article on five “unknown” travel destinations in Greece – Astypalea, Lipsi, Skyros, Tinos and Ithaki – which are attracting the interest of Italian travellers.

In a long article, La Repubblica defines Greece “as the ideal holiday destination in the world with more than 200 dream islands and a nation that is the cradle of Western civilization and the home of democracy”.

astypalaia

Photo source: @Municipality of Astypalea

Referring to the island of Astypalea, also known as the “butterfly of the Aegean”, La Repubblica describes it as a “paradise of historical monuments, picturesque villages, magnificent beaches, incomparable gastronomy and of fine local products, such as honey, also offering experiences for hikers and nature lovers”.

The Italian newspaper also claims that Astypalea is leading the future of sustainability in Greece, thanks to pioneering “green” projects.

Lipsi

The Greek island of Lipsi is described by La Repubblica as an “ecological paradise” with colorful beaches.

Lipsi is also home to the first dolphin protection center in the Mediterranean.

Incredible seafood, authentic recipes, Greek mythology, traditional villages, boat trips, excursions, fine red wines and delicious local cheeses, are some of the experiences offered on Lipsi, says La Repubblica.

Skyros, Tinos, Ithaca

Skyros Island. Photo: © Dimitrios Rizopoulos / Shutterstock

On Skiros, according to La Repubblica, visitors will certainly appreciate the mythology and rich history. The element highlights the traditional architecture of the island and the small alleys of Chora.

As it concerns TinosLa Repubblica focuses on the island’s unique sculptures, 40 traditional villages and impressive beaches.

“Tinos is a treasure trove of picturesque villages that must be photographed,” notes La Repubblica.

Finally, La Repubblica praises Ithaki for its rich mythology and recommends the island to those looking for a unique sailing destination.


Follow GTP headlines on Google News to keep up to date with all the latest news on tourism and travel in Greece.

Foreign Forces Archives – Page 304 of 304

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Iran threatens to exploit the Strait of Hormuz, oil markets react, global economies take notice, and more naval forces are sent to the region, raising the stakes for Tehran and the US Navy.

Late last year, the commander-in-chief of Iran’s navy, Admiral Habibollah Sayyari, warned that closing the strait would be “easier than drinking a glass of water”. The Obama administration has publicly dismissed the threat as “saber-braking,” but has also privately advised Tehran that attempting to close the strait would trigger a US military response.

“The laying of mines in international waters is an act of war,” Vice Admiral Mark Fox, commander of the US Navy’s Fifth Fleet, said in a Feb. 12 interview.
“We, under the direction of the national leadership, would prevent this from happening. We always have the right and the obligation of self-defense and that is self-defense. If we did nothing and allowed some mining, it would be a long and difficult process to clean them up.

Whether it is an act of war or not (international rules – certainly more honored in their violation than observation – authorize the exploitation in peacetime of the high seas under certain strict conditions), the Iranian officials have threatened to close the Strait of Hormuz in response to Western sanctions over its nuclear program.

US Navy photo of the USS Enterprise and USS Cape St. George passing through the Strait of Hormuz on May 11.

But the ultimate impact of such an escalation – if only in rhetoric – is unclear. According to a Jan. 23 report by the Congressional Research Service “…as in the past, the prospect of a major disruption to maritime traffic in the strait risks damaging Iranian interests. US and allied military capabilities in the region remain formidable. This makes an outright and prolonged closure of the strait unlikely. Nonetheless, such threats may heighten tensions in global energy markets and force the United States and other global oil consumers to consider the risks of another potential conflict in the Middle East.


A key transportation route for a daily flow of 17 million barrels of oil – around 35% of the world’s oil trade by sea – according to the US Energy Information Administration, the Strait of Hormuz is around 175 miles long nautical miles and narrows to 21 nautical miles. miles wide, making it an “international strait” under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. These international straits, which are completely surrounded by the 12-mile territorial seas of the coastal states, enjoy protective under the UNCLOS regime, even though the United States has not yet ratified the treaty.

Since the end of World War II, mines have severely damaged or sunk four times as many US Navy ships as all other means of attack combined. Fifteen of the 19 ships fell victim to mines. And that doesn’t include many more sunken or mine-damaged ships, from the Corfu Channel crisis of 1946 to the Persian Gulf tanker wars of the 1980s to the sinking of the MV’s Tamil Sea Tigers. Invincible In 2008.

During the Tanker War in the Persian Gulf, Iraq and Iran indiscriminately deployed several types of mines, including variants of the 1908 Russian-designed contact mine that nearly sank the USS frigate. Samuel B. Roberts (FFG-58) in April 1988. After the United States agreed to provide protection for the tanker convoys, the first convoy ran into trouble when the American-flagged supertanker MV Bridgeton struck a mine which gouged a large hole in her hull. Almost immediately, US Navy surface warships lined up astern Bridgeton, belying the adage that every ship can be a minesweeper once. If more mines were present, Bridgeton was to clear the way.

In 1990 and 1991, Iraq deployed more than 1,300 mines in the northern Gulf, including a weapon never before seen in the West. In the early morning of February 18, 1991, the USS Tripoli (LPH-10), carrying airborne mine countermeasures helicopters, struck an Iraqi contact mine; four hours later, the cruiser Aegis Princeton (CG-59) fell victim to a Manta mine, a “mission-kill” that took the cruiser out of the war and cost around $100 million to bring it back online. More at the point of the impact of a possible Iranian mining campaign in 2012, it took multinational Coalition forces more than two years of intensive mine countermeasures operations to declare the northern Gulf mine-free.

According to then-Chief of Naval Operations, Admiral Gary Roughead, in 2009 more than one million mines of 300 types were in the inventories of more than 65 navies. Russia had about 250,000 mines. The Chinese Navy is estimated to have around 100,000 mines, including a rising mine that could be deployed in waters deeper than 6,000 feet. And North Korea had about 50,000 mines. All three sell weapons to virtually any navy or terrorist group, anywhere, anytime, as do about 17 other countries.

Iran has acquired a stockpile of 3,000 to 6,000 mines, mostly of Soviet/Russian, Chinese or North Korean origin. Most are unsophisticated but still dangerous floating contact mines, such as those that damaged Robert and Tripoli. Other mines, like the Manta that hit Princeton, are bottom mines that come to rest on the bottom and wait for a target to satisfy various parameters. These influence mines are triggered when increasingly sophisticated target detection devices detect the magnetic, acoustic, seismic, water pressure, and electrical potential signatures of their victims.

An Iranian mine, the Chinese-made EM-52, is a multiple-influence (acoustic, magnetic, pressure) rocket-propelled mine armed with a 600-pound high-explosive warhead, which can be deployed by naval vessels. surface in waters as deep as 600 feet.

The inventory is also believed to include around 600 advanced multi-influence mines purchased from Russia, including MDM-3 which can be dropped from aircraft.

Mines can be emplaced by virtually any underwater, surface, and airborne platform. To effectively mine the entire Strait of Hormuz would require thousands of mines and several weeks or more. Iran could use Kilo-class submarines, which can carry 24 mines. But a larger operation should also involve small craft and possibly commercial vessels. A 2010 report by the Near East and Gulf Institute for Military Analysis shows these Iranian capabilities of the minelaying platform:

Physics will help delineate the problem. Generally, the water depth of the strait ranges from around 200 feet to 300 feet, but its northwest approaches are shallower, around 120 feet deep. In the strait itself, depths can reach 1,000 feet and currents make the deployment of bottom mines an uncertain tactic. If deployed in deep water, even large warhead bottom mines would have a limited effect on surface traffic.

Libya’s Red Sea mining in the summer of 1984, for example, used multi-influence bottom mines exported by East Germany, totally unknown to the West. Ships that detonated mines in deeper water suffered significantly less damage than those in shallower water. (A total of 23 ships reported being mine victims, although four were later assessed as insurance scams.)

Not that bottom mines wouldn’t be employed where it makes operational sense, but Iran would likely rely on bottom-moored contact mines that hide near the surface but remain difficult to detect and defeat. .

Mines are just one element of Iran’s anti-access/area denial weapons, which include speedboats armed with guns and missiles, small and mini submarines armed with torpedoes, anti-ship missiles based on land and planes.

In response to Iran’s mines rattle, the Navy is deploying four additional Avenger-class MCM ships to the region, for a total of eight Avengers, along with two more MH-53E airborne MCM helicopters added to the two already in theater. The additional units will be based in Bahrain, home to the navy’s Fifth Fleet. “I came to the conclusion that we could do better to prepare the theater,” said Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert to the Senate Armed Services Committee during a Navy budget hearing earlier this year. “I wanted to be sure…that we are ready, that our people are competent, that they are confident and that they are good at what they do when needed.”

The Navy also announced that the USS Mackerel (LPD-15) is being refitted to support naval forces in the region, primarily focused on the MCM mission. A provisional Advanced Intermediate Afloat Base (AFSB), its “main battery” will consist of AMCM helicopters and support craft. This too has been done before, with the mid-1990s conversion of USS Inchon (LPH/MCS-12) as the MCM command and control vessel.

In addition, the naval MCM “order of battle” includes several Royal Navy MCM ships and Royal Australian Navy assets, as well as MCM capabilities from regional US maritime partners.

“It’s a volume issue more than a technical challenge,” Navy Lt. Cmdr. Wayne Liebold, captain of the USS Gladiator (MCM-11), one of the Avenger MCM ships based in Bahrain, said The Huffington Post. “My concern is going out there and having to search for a large volume of water with large amounts of mines,” said Liebold, who has completed three MCM deployments to the gulf.

Although easily detectable, the laying of several hundred mines in a few days could have a significant, albeit temporary, effect on commercial and naval mobility. More generally, however, the impact on global oil markets is unclear. During the Red Sea and Gulf of Suez mining crisis of 1984, commercial and naval traffic continued unabated, despite reports of underwater explosions, and world oil prices virtually stagnated. not been affected.

“Conventional wisdom might suggest that the outbreak of hostilities in the Strait of Hormuz or the Persian Gulf would significantly halt or discourage the flow of maritime traffic through the strait,” said Cmdr. Rodney A. Mills wrote in a 2008 Naval War College study, “But the ‘tanker wars’ between Iran and Iraq in the 1980s show a different behavior of the shipping industry. During the eight years of conflict, 544 attacks were carried out against all ships in the Gulf, leaving more than 400 civilians killed and 400 others injured. However, after an initial drop of 25%, the shipping industry adjusted to the risk and trade flow picked up. Despite the threat, oil and other maritime commerce continued to flow even as the conflict escalated until 1987, when a total of 179 attacks were carried out, roughly one attack every two days.

In short, while Iranian mines may not be obstacles, they certainly can be speed bumps that attack strategies, plans, and timelines, in addition to ships and submarines.

Love Island’s Curtis Pritchard hits out at islanders for ‘selling their souls for money’

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LOVE Island star Curtis Pritchard has slammed the islanders for “selling their souls for money”.

The 26-year-old told this year’s finalists to ‘stay true to themselves’ after leaving the villa – instead of making big deals they don’t believe in.

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Curtis Pritchard offered advice to this year’s Love Island starsCredit: Rex Features
He was in a relationship with Maura Higgins

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He was in a relationship with Maura Higgins1 credit

Curtis – who is starring in Cinderella with brother AJ at De Montford Hall in Leicester this Christmas – has given advice to stars tempted to sell cash – and how to deal with trolling.

“Don’t read any comments,” insisted Curtis, who rose to prominence on the fifth series of Love Island.

“Ignore everything except what you are doing and what your loved ones are doing. Stay true to yourself.

“Only do the things you want to do. Don’t sell yourself for the wrong reasons.

Love Island's Gemma reveals a secret feud with two islanders - have you spotted it?
Love Island fans claim they've 'determined' the real reason Luca broke down

“Don’t just follow the money and sell your soul for money. For 1% it works, but for the other 99% it doesn’t.

“You’ll only end up having no money or not being happy.”

I’m A Celebrity and the former Strictly AJ star added to The Sun: “They think they’re doing stuff that makes them happy, but that won’t last long.

“They have a platform and I hope they use it to help charities and do things they are passionate about.”

The talented brothers team up again to lead an all-star panto, alongside CBeebies Evie Pickerill, funny man Jarred Christmas and Leicester panto legend Martin Ballard.

This follows their hugely successful stint in the same production last year at the Wolverhampton Grand Theatre.

“The great thing is that if there was something we wanted to do better or differently from last year, we can.

“The script has been tweaked and we’re in a different realm. The show is going to be ten times better.

“It’s going to be a good one.

“Panto is for everyone, all ages. That’s what makes it so magical.

Normally this is the first theater children are exposed to and it could completely change their outlook on life.

“It might make them want to get into acting and performance. That’s what’s so special about it.

“Panto is the best way to bring families together for a brilliant evening of fun, laughter and magic.

“This year is going to be bigger and better than ever and we can’t wait to see you all there.”

Gemma Owen's mum sparks fury as she fails to give Love Island warning
Christine McGuinness ditches wedding ring as she watches Lionesses win

Be sure to put on your rags and get your ticket to the ball when it kicks off on December 10.

Tickets are on sale now at demontforthall.co.uk or visit imaginetheatre.co.uk.

10 of the best sailing holidays in Europe | Sailing holidays

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Yachting, Amalfi Coast

Novice sailors can explore the Amalfi Coast on this four-day yacht trip from Amalfi to Procida via Capri. There are swimming and snorkeling opportunities, including a dip next to Capri’s Blue Grotto, as well as time ashore to explore. Living conditions are quite cramped – eight people share four small cabins and two bathrooms – but much more time is spent on deck or outside. No sailing experience is necessary, but there will be a chance to participate, especially when entering or leaving the port. The trip is suitable for ages 15 and up. intrepid journey also offers a one-week version, with additional nights in Ischia and Sorrento and a visit to Pompeii.
Four daysincluding a selection of meals and activities, from £737, intrepidtravel.com

Day Trips, Cornwall

Navigate the Mascot from Charlestown

Those unsure if sailing is for them can dip a toe in the water on a day trip aboard the Bristol Channel’s largest pilot cutter, departing from Charlestown Harbor in Cornwall, which was featured in the television series Poldark. A morning sail on Mascotte starts from £60 pp (classic-sailing.com). And if you like the idea of ​​a boat but not the sailing itself, the refurbished fishing boat Pen Glas has overnight bunk beds from £25,
charlestownharbour.com

Seafood Festival, Scotland

Danish gaff cutter Eda Frandsen
Danish gaff cutter Eda Frandsen. Photography: Eda Frandsen Sailing

Originally a fishing trawler working in the North Sea, Danish gaff cutter Eda Frandsen splits her time between the west coast of Scotland, exploring quiet anchorages around the Western Isles, and Cornish waters. At 18 meters long, she takes up to eight guests. Local, sustainable food is a highlight, so expect wild crab, langoustine, mackerel and scallops as you explore the waters of St Kilda, the Small Isles, the Inner Hebrides or Skye.
A three night trip on Eda Frandsen costs £550, six nights from £1,100, eda-frandsen.co.uk

Food tour, Croatia

Sail Croatia has launched a new island-hopping gastronomic route Food2
Sail Croatia’s gastronomic route passes through Split, Havar, Vis, Palkeni and Makarska Islands

Sail Croatia has launched a new island-hopping gastronomic itinerary, sailing on six- to 10-person yachts and mooring at restaurants for dinner. The trip begins and ends in Split and calls at three ports in Hvar, as well as Vis, Pakleni Islands and Makarska on the mainland. Suggested locations range from traditional Dalmatian konobas and from family fish restaurants to modern waterside restaurants. A star is Horaa restaurant at an organic farm and winery on the island of Hvar, which offers olive oil, cheese and wine tastings, and specializes in lamb peka, cooked over open fire. The skipper makes reservations and can customize your itinerary.
Seven days including transfers, excluding restaurant bills, from £332, sailing-croatia.com

Smart Navigation, British Coast

Sail Britain Sail Britain Secret Harbor
Conservation and marine biology are at the center of Sail Britain’s voyages, as well as memorable sailings

Sail Britain’s aim is not just to provide a memorable sailing experience, but to inspire positive change for the oceans. Voyages aboard the 12-metre offshore cruiser Merlin are a mix of sailing and education, with titles including ‘creative leadership’, ‘ocean optimism’ and ‘wild food and sailing’. A qualified skipper is joined by a specialist in conservation, art, marine biology or wild food, among other disciplines, for a week-long voyage around parts of the UK coast.
The seven days Our Living Ocean ttear, navigate between Mallaig and Oban in September, is £750, sailbritain.org

Soft sailing, Greece

Saronic Islands, Greece Sailing trip on 50ft Zorba
The Zorba in the Saronic Islands. Photography: Paul Terry

If you love warm weather, a trip on the 15-meter Zorba might be the answer: a Greek sailing vacation away from the crowds. With five private cabins on this modern yacht, this vacation is all about relaxation, island hopping, swimming and snorkeling as much as sailing.
A eightday trip around Saronic Islands in Greece of £895, venturesailholidays.com

Island Adventure, Spain

Hiking on La Gomera.
Hiking on La Gomera. Photography: Westend61 GmbH/Alamy

This week-long sailing trip, starting and ending in Tenerife, is an opportunity to visit two lesser-known Canary Islands: La Gomera and La Palma. Passengers can hike La Gomera, explore its capital, San Sebastián, lounge on the beach and swim from the boat. There is a free day in La Palma, which can be spent in the capital, Santa Cruz, or visiting the island. The 17 meter yacht has five twin/double cabins, three bathrooms, deck space for sleeping under the stars, an outside shower and a bathing platform. The minimum age is 16 and no experience is required.
Seven days from £949, gaventures.com

Swimming and diving, Turkey

Sedir Island, Gokova Bay.
Sedir Island, Gokova Bay. Photography: Aliyah

This eight-day trip on a traditional schooner sails the Gulf of Gokova, with its secluded bays backed by vast forests and plenty of opportunities to swim and snorkel in the sparkling Aegean Sea. The round trip from Bodrum visits Sedir Island, also known as Cleopatra Island, the secret meeting place of the Egyptian Queen and Mark Anthony, and Oren, which has Roman ruins and Byzantine churches. Guests stay in en-suite cabins and all meals are included, as are paddleboard and fishing gear.
Eight days from £875 pp, responsibletravel.com

Flotilla sailing, Greece

This flotilla holiday is ideal for beginners who want to sail on their own yacht: a group of 10-12 boats are guided by a lead yacht with a skipper, engineer and host. The Ionian Islands are ideal for first-timers, especially Paxos and the southern archipelago. A week-long stay begins in Lefkas, stopping at Kefalonia, Ithaca, Kalamos, Kastos and Meganisi. For two weeks, the flotilla sails from Corfu to Kefalonia. Most sailing days are only 12-15 miles, with some longer days, and there are swim stops along the way. Social events with the other boats, such as picnics and drinks, are also a highlight.
One week, including flights, of £575; two weeks of £655, sailvacances.com

whale watching, Portugal

A 1930s cod fishing tall ship is now a spacious vacation vessel for the Azores Islands. This trip starts and ends in Terceira, dropping anchor in quiet spots around the central islands and watching whales in the São Jorge Channel. Stops include Graciosa, the northernmost island, which has a 40-meter-high volcanic cave and sulphurous lake, and Faial’s capital, Horta, a bustling meeting place for sailors. Passengers can join a night shift and scale the rig, or simply enjoy the kayaks, paddleboards, and dive ribs. There are 16 double cabins and meals on board are included.
Eight days from £1,050, sailwiz.com

Wyl Menmuir is the author of The draw of the sea (Aurum, £16.99), winner of the Roger Deakin Prize for Nature Writing

Many recent vehicle thefts in Grand Island “for nothing” | Grand Island Local News

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A wave of vehicle thefts on Grand Island continues and the Grand Island Police Department is asking for the public’s help.

GIPD Captain Dean Elliott said there had been “dozens” of stolen vehicles over the past month, worth “several hundred thousand dollars”.

Elliott said that while some vehicles have been recovered after being driven and abandoned, there are still vehicles that have yet to be recovered.

He said Thursday that a stolen vehicle from Grand Island was found in Aurora.

“Immediately Aurora (law enforcement) discovered that two vehicles were stolen from Aurora,” he said.

According to the GIPD crime report, within 24 hours three vehicles were reported stolen and one attempted motor vehicle theft.

In each theft, keys were left in unlocked vehicles, the report said.

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The attempted theft took place on Michigan Avenue on July 28, an electric starter credited with preventing a fourth motor vehicle theft that day.

The report indicates that the starter was pressed three times. Elliott said the key fob was far enough away that it wouldn’t start.

Nothing was taken or damaged, according to the report.

Elliott said the motive for the thefts was the cars themselves. Still, during the motor vehicle theft epidemic, items such as iPads, cell phones, cash and firearms have been reported stolen, Elliot said.

“All for nothing,” he said.

“They’re not (being) wired,” Elliott said. “Vehicles that get stolen have keys inside.”

He advised not to leave keys and valuables in the vehicle and to ensure the doors are locked.

“These days, you can’t believe people won’t come onto your property to snoop through your belongings and take what isn’t theirs.”

GIPD has footage from outside cameras but, Elliott said, “it’s so good.”

What seems to make a difference is that community members are aware of their surroundings.

“We have noticed an increase… in (people) reporting suspicious vehicles,” Elliott noted.

“(People) pay a little more attention to vehicles parked in their neighborhood that aren’t normally there and have been there for a day or two, or they have no idea who the vehicle belongs to because it isn’t there. is normally not in the neighborhood,” Elliott said.

“They are leading us to recover some of these stolen vehicles at the earliest.”

Elliott said he appreciates the community being more vigilant, but ultimately there is an easier way to avoid a stolen vehicle.

“(GIPD) would also like them to help by removing their keys from their vehicle, their expensive property and locking their car.”

Jessica Votipka is an education reporter at the Grand Island Independent. She can be reached at 308-381-5420.

Ikos plans a second seaside getaway in Corfu

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Image courtesy of Ikos Resorts.

Ikos Resorts is expanding its luxury all-inclusive offering with a second property on the island of Corfu, slated to open in May 2023.

The exclusive new Ikos Odisia promises a sophisticated seaside getaway, where architecture and aesthetics blend seamlessly with nature, embodying the brand’s essence of luxury.

Lush blend

The second Ikos to open on the Greek island sits in an iconic location, protected in a secluded bay opposite the brand’s first property on the island, Ikos Dassia. The new Ikos Odisia is gracefully elevated for spectacular views and landscape panoramas of the Ionian Sea.

Beautifully designed by Nimand Architects, the new beachfront resort has 395 rooms, suites, bungalows and villas, each carefully designed for couples and families of all sizes.

Set on 60 acres and blending seamlessly into lush natural surroundings, Ikos Odisia will welcome its guests to an elegant waterfront ambience. The five-star property will welcome the outdoors indoors, taking full advantage of the unspoiled nature that surrounds the resort.

Upscale guests can upgrade to exclusive Deluxe Collection suites in an unparalleled area of ​​the resort with personalized pre-arrival planning via a personal concierge and a range of benefits.

Michelin star dinner

Ikos Odisia will have five à la carte restaurants, with menus created by Michelin-starred chefs featuring flavors from Greece, Italy, Peru and Asia, as well as a Mediterranean buffet-style restaurant. Creative cocktails and a choice of 300 international and local wines will be served by Ikos’ expert sommeliers and mixologists at the hotel’s indoor and outdoor bars, which offer a venue for all occasions, from casual beach bars to elegant live music backdrops.

Taking full advantage of the resort’s elevated location, Ikos Odisia’s exclusive new restaurant, The View Lounge, welcomes guests to picturesque views of the Ionian Sea and serves cocktails, light snacks and a full celebratory dinner menu. a fusion of Peruvian cuisine.

A myriad of amenities

The resort will offer 10 outdoor and indoor heated swimming pools, including children’s and adult-only pools, as well as a 420m white-sand beach. Activity options include a state-of-the-art fitness center and sports facilities and activities such as tennis, canoeing, mountain biking or windsurfing. The Ikos Spa offers breathtaking views of the Ionian Sea, the perfect setting for a luxurious signature treatment, with beauty products from Anne Semonin Paris.

The resort will house a complementary kids’ club for children and teens aged 4 to 17, offering activities such as crafts, sports, cooking and science. Guests with babies and toddlers can take advantage of the Heroes crèche and childcare services, with professional childcare available.

As with all Ikos properties, Ikos Odisia will help the local community to have a positive impact on the economy of Corfu Island and the destination in general. The station will work with local suppliers and generate 700 new jobs, at least half of which will be filled by locals. The resort will also establish sustainable hotel operations under the Ikos Green program, including being carbon neutral and implementing zero waste initiatives.

Sight Magazine – Wow! : No trash is wasted on the Greek islands in the race to recycle

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Tilos, Greece
Thomson Reuters Foundation

Before the tiny Greek island of Tilos became a big name in recycling, tavern owner Aristoteles Chatzifountas knew that every time he threw his restaurant’s rubbish into a municipal bin down the street, it would end up in the local landfill.

The rubbish site had become a growing scourge on the island of now 500 people off the southern coast of Greece since ships began bringing in packaged goods from neighboring islands in 1960.

A Polygreen employee picks up trash from a hotel on the island of Tilos, Greece, on June 30. PHOTO: Thomson Reuters Foundation/Sébastien Malo.

Six decades later, in December last year, the island launched a major campaign to solve its pollution problem. Today, it recycles up to 86% of its waste, a record in Greece, according to the authorities, and the landfill is closed.

Chatzifountas said it only took a month to get used to separating his waste into three bins – one for organic matter; the other for paper, plastic, aluminum and glass; and the third for everything else.

“We know how to win races. But it’s not a sprint. It’s the first step [and] it is not easy.”

– The Deputy Mayor of Tilos, Spyros Aliferis.

“Closing the landfill was the right solution,” he told the Thomson Reuters Foundation. “We need a permanent and greener response.”

Tilos’ triumph over waste puts it ahead in a kind of inter-island race, as Greece catches up to meet tough recycling targets set by the European Union and institutions, businesses and governments around the world are adopting zero-waste policies in their efforts to limit greenhouse gas emissions.

“We know how to win races,” said Tilos Deputy Mayor Spyros Aliferis. “But it’s not a sprint. It’s the first step [and] it is not easy.”

The island’s performance contrasts with that of Greece as a whole. In 2019, the country only recycled and composted a fifth of its municipal waste, putting it 24th out of 27 countries ranked by the EU statistics office.

This falls far short of EU targets to recycle or prepare for reuse 55% of municipal waste by weight by 2025 and 65% by 2035.

Greece has taken action against the throwaway culture, such as forcing stores to charge customers for single-use plastic bags.

Still, “we’re quite behind when it comes to recycling and reuse here,” said Dimitrios Komilis, professor of solid waste management at Democritus University of Thrace in northern Greece.

Recycling can reduce global warming emissions by reducing the need to make new products with raw materials, the extraction of which is carbon-heavy, Komilis added.

greek islands polygreen3

A man places a can in a recycling bin in Tilos, Greece on July 1. PHOTO: Thomson Reuters Foundation/Sébastien Malo

Getting rid of landfills can also slow the release of methane, another potent greenhouse gas produced when organic materials such as food and vegetation are buried in landfills and rot in low oxygen conditions.

And environmental groups note that waste management systems can generate more jobs than landfilling or incineration, because collecting, sorting and recycling waste is more labor intensive.

But achieving zero waste isn’t as simple as following Tilos’ example – every region or city generates and manages waste differently, said researcher Dominik Noll, who works on sustainable island transitions at the Institute of Vienna social ecology.

“Technical solutions can be extended, but the socio-economic and socio-cultural contexts are always different,” he said.

“Each project or program must pay attention to these contexts in order to implement waste reduction and treatment solutions.”



Tilos has earned a reputation as a testing ground for Greece’s green ambitions, becoming the first Greek island to ban hunting in 1993 and, in 2018, one of the first islands in the Mediterranean to operate primarily on land. wind and solar energy.

For its “Just Go Zero” project, the island has partnered with Polygreen, a Piraeus-based business network promoting a circular economy, which aims to take waste and pollution out of supply chains.

Several times a week, Polygreen sends around ten local employees to go door to door to collect household and professional waste, which they then sort manually.

Antonis Mavropoulos, a consultant who designed Polygreen’s operation, said the “secret” to successful recycling is maximizing the market value of the waste.

“The more you separate, the more valuable the materials,” he said, explaining that waste collected in Tilos is sold to recycling companies in Athens.

Greek Islands Polygreen2

Workers sort municipal waste at a Polygreen factory on the island of Tilos, Greece, on June 30. PHOTO: Thomson Reuters Foundation/Sébastien Malo

One morning in June, workers were milling around the floor of the Polygreen recycling facility, perched next to the disused landfill in the arid mountains of Tilos.

They quickly separated a colorful assortment of waste into 25 streams – from used vegetable oil, destined to become biodiesel, to cigarette butts, which are dismantled to be composted or turned into materials like sound insulation.

Organic waste is composted. But some waste, like medical masks or used towels, can’t be recycled, so Polygreen shreds it, to be turned into solid recovered fuel for the cement industry on the continent.

More than 100 tonnes of municipal solid waste – the equivalent of the weight of nearly 15 large African elephants – has been sorted so far, said project manager Daphne Mantziou.

The project cost less than €250,000 to set up – and, according to figures from Polygreen, managing it does not exceed the combined cost of a regular municipal waste management operation and the new €20 per tonne tax. landfill waste that Greece introduced in January.

More than 10 Greek municipalities and some smaller countries have expressed interest in replicating the project, said company spokesperson Elli Panagiotopoulou, who declined to give details.


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Replicating Tilos’ success on a larger scale could be tricky, said Noll, the sustainability researcher.

Big cities may have the money and the infrastructure to effectively manage their waste, but recruiting key officials and millions of households is a more difficult undertaking, he said.

“It’s just easier to engage with people on a more personal level in a smaller municipality,” Noll said.

When the island of Paros, about 200 kilometers northwest of Tilos, decided to clean up, it faced a city-sized challenge, said Zana Kontomanoli, who leads the Clean Blue initiative Paros run by Common Seas, a British company. social enterprise based.

The island’s population of around 12,000 increases during the tourist season when hundreds of thousands of visitors lead to a 5,000% increase in litter, including 4.5 million plastic bottles a year, said Kontomanoli.

In response, Common Seas launched an island-wide campaign in 2019 to reduce bottled water consumption, one of its many anti-plastic pollution projects.

Using street banners and on-screen messages on ferries, the idea was to dispel the common but misguided belief that local water is not safe to drink.

The share of visitors who think they can’t drink the island’s tap water has fallen from 100% to 33%, Kontomanoli said.

“If we can prevent these plastic bottles from coming to the island, we think that’s a better solution” than recycling them, she said.

Greek Islands Polygreen4

A Polygreen employee picks up trash on the island of Tilos, Greece, on June 30. PHOTO: Thomson Reuters Foundation/Sébastien Malo

Another anti-waste group thinking big is the nonprofit DAFNI Sustainable Greek Islands Network, which has been sending workers in electric vehicles to collect waste for recycling and reuse on the island of Kythnos since last summer. .

Project manager Despina Bakogianni said this was once touted as “the biggest tech innovation project ever on a Greek island” – but the race for zero waste is now heating up, and there are already plans more ambitious in progress.

These include CircularGreece, a new €16 million initiative that DAFNI has joined with five Greek islands and several mainland regions, such as Athens, all aiming to reuse and recycle more and boost the use of renewable energy. .

“It will be the largest circular economy project in Greece,” Bakogianni said.

How Summerside — and Prince Edward Island — is leading Canada’s energy revolution

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On a small island, and in an even smaller city, a major energy revolution is taking shape — and it’s all thanks to the willingness of the people who live there to do things a little differently.

From wind farms to giant solar farms, big things are happening in Summerside, Prince Edward Island, a city on Canada’s east coast with a can-do attitude and a willingness to act as a case study for the rest of the country on sparking the renewable energy revolution.

The community’s flagship project is an 80-acre, $69 million solar project that will go live later this year.

It’s called the Summerside Sunbank and once fully operational, approximately 65% ​​of Summerside’s electricity will come from locally generated renewable energy. That’s a remarkable feat for any city in Canada, especially one as small as Summerside.

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An image captured from drone video shows the Summerside Sunbank under construction. The massive 90-acre solar project will supply a quarter of all the city’s needs once it becomes operational later this year.


Volatus Aerospace


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The undeveloped land of the Summerside Sunbank prior to construction.


City of Summerside


The Sunbank project, along with a host of other energy and smart grid initiatives, reflects a spirit of independence that residents are proud of here.

Greg Gaudet, electrical engineer and director of Summerside Electric, simply calls it “self-reliance” – not relying on global energy markets, which can take wild turns “depending on what’s happening in the world. “.

As for the positive attitude, the mayor, Basil Stewart, says: “Things will not happen by themselves; you have to realize them. Always quick to come up with a metaphor, Stewart, who served as mayor of Summerside for more than three decades, says he likes to think of himself and his team as “work horses, not show horses.”

Summerside is a city of 16,000 located on one of the narrowest stretches of Prince Edward Island, Canada’s smallest province. It is only four kilometers from the northern shore of the island to the south.

Surrounded on both sides by the sea, there is an abundance of wind and solar power on the island – and therein an economic opportunity that this unassuming little community has been taking advantage of for the past few years.

He is now keen to show the rest of Canada – and the world – how it can be done.

Energy independence

For decades, Summerside depended on electricity transmitted by an undersea cable from New Brunswick, just across the Northumberland Strait.

But the city wanted to free itself from its need to depend on other provinces for its electricity supply, and with wind and solar, it saw an opportunity to do so.

Summerside was in a unique position because it had its own power company. This means residents are the owners and can determine their own energy future. “We have our own electric utility, and we’ve had it for a hundred years,” says Stewart.

Read more:

As Europe cooks, Germany counts on a return to coal

Combine that with an ambitious push by city officials to seek federal and provincial funding for renewable energy projects, and the city has pushed for energy self-sufficiency.

“Horse and wagon may still be allowed on the road,” adds Stewart, referring to energy systems of the past, “but the chances of getting run over are much more common now with the way the world is changing.”

It’s a lesson countries like Germany and the Netherlands are learning the hard way right now. They have long depended on Russian gas imports, but with Moscow largely isolated by Western countries, there are fears that the Kremlin could turn off the taps to Europe at any moment.

Takeover attempts

Marlene Campbell, programming coordinator in the city’s cultural office, recently co-authored a book documenting the 100-year history of Summerside Electric, the city-owned electric utility.

“Lighting the Way” by Marlene Campbell and Jean MacKay recounts the various efforts made to keep Summerside Electric in the hands of local people.


Summerside culture


The book, titled Lighting the Way: The Story of Summerside Electric, 1920-2020details how as early as 1928, power companies outside of Summerside were trying to convince residents that they were “getting a bad deal” with their municipal power plant.

But true to the residents’ “do it” attitude, the city held firm and retained its locally owned and operated facility.

Over the decades that followed, the local factory became a source of pride, and it has remained so. But people had to fight for it.

“Having the utility has allowed the citizens of Summerside to have so many benefits that they otherwise wouldn’t have,” Campbell told Global News. These include a major restoration of the boardwalk, sparkling recreational facilities and electricity rates that are only a fraction of the cost they would cost if Summerside imported more of its electricity from outside the town.

“Major public services are owned by shareholders. You know the more you can put [the price of] the more electricity, the more money they make,” says Mayor Stewart.

It’s a “community-driven” and “business-driven” model, says Bobby Dunn, the utility’s business development and sales manager.

Dunn is responsible for rolling out a smart grid program that uses purpose-built devices like furnaces and water heaters in residents’ homes to store excess energy as heat.

The “Heat for Less” program essentially allows these devices to double as batteries – storing excess energy inside people’s homes and feeding the city’s energy grid when needed, including when the sun is out. shine or the wind blows.

“Our goal was to keep that energy in the community,” says Dunn.

The fact that excess power is kept in “reserve” allows Summerside Electric to provide residents with electricity at about half the rate elsewhere, Dunn says.

The system benefits the community just as the cash savings in your bank account would benefit you in times of need.

It is also a business strategy.

“If you are a businessman, you know that you have reliable and stable energy [here]“, says Dunn.

“Summerside,” according to Steven Myers, the provincial energy minister, is “the gold standard of energy transition.”

It shows what can happen when residents control the keys to their own energy future. “It was a very smart decision at the time to keep [Summerside Electric] into local ownership,” says Myers.

The Samso model

Summerside is not the first small municipality to try to become 100% renewable in a short period of time.

Twenty-five years ago, the community of Samsø, located on a small island off the coast of Denmark, decided to make a rapid switch to renewable energy. Like PEI, most of Samsø’s electricity came from an undersea cable and was generated by burning fossil fuels, primarily coal.

But Samsø decided early on that this would change – investing in both onshore and offshore wind, as well as solar parks. As in Summerside, it is committed to reinvesting all revenue generated by these facilities back into the community. In 2007, Samsø generated enough electricity from renewable energy to offset the fossil fuel emissions that were still being generated.

Prince Edward Island, like Samsø, wants to become as self-sufficient as possible. In 2019, energy officials traveled to Denmark to learn how another island community managed to use energy from the sun and wind in their own garden to keep the lights on.

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Wind turbines dot the island on the “renewable energy island” of Samsø in Denmark.


Thomson Reuters Foundation


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In 2019, officials from Prince Edward Island visited Samsø to see how it managed to accelerate the transition to renewable energy.


Steven Myers


The key to Samsø’s success, says Myers during his visit, is that its citizens have been involved in the transition.

“They felt like it was their windmill, not just an entity’s windmill,” says Myers. This is precisely what happened in Summerside.

“When residents can see where the money has gone, it gives you better social license to keep building.”

And that’s what’s happening in Summerside, says the mayor.

“A municipality is no different from any other business. If you’re not moving forward, you’re going backwards. »

Growing interest in holiday homes | eKathimerini.com

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Demand for holiday homes is set to increase further, bolstered in several areas by the numerous infrastructure projects underway, predicts a new nationwide survey by property network RE/MAX Greece.

It showed that demand does not seem to have been particularly affected by inflationary pressures or the war in Ukraine. Of the 76 real estate agencies with more than 1,000 business advisers, 61% indicated that the demand for holiday homes was not significantly affected, while 39% (mainly in northern Greece) pointed out that the demand for renting furnished apartments in city centers, for example in Thessaloniki, has increased considerably.

According to the company, many people from northern Europe report that they are considering moving to Greece permanently after retirement. At the same time, according to RE/MAX, “the strengthening of the demand for Greek second homes this year seems to have benefited from the very good performance of tourism, but also from prices significantly lower than other Mediterranean or European destinations”.

Survey data showed that Mykonos was the destination with the highest asking prices for house sales (7,250 euros per square meter). Paros and Santorini follow, with an average asking price of €3,450/m². and €3,250/m². respectively.

In the Ionian Sea, Corfu (€1,800-2,500/m²), Kefalonia (€1,500-2,600/m²) and Lefkada (€1,700-2,150/m²) are moving around the same levels in terms of average asking prices , while sales prices in the tourist destinations of Halkidiki, Volos and Kalamata in mainland Greece are €1,583/m², €1,700/m². and €1,950/m². respectively.

Regarding the countries most interested in acquiring holiday homes in Greece, RE/MAX sees a split between northern and southern Greece: in the northern part of the country, the interest comes mainly from Germans (including many Greek expatriates), Serbs, Bulgarians, Romanians and Albanians. In southern Greece, buyers from Israel, China, Germany, France and Lebanon are the most interested.

Venice tests cruise passenger tender to allow large ships into port

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The Norwegian Gem has become the first major cruise ship to send passengers to Venice (File photo by Jennifer courtesy of Norwegian Cruise Line)

Posted on July 26, 2022 at 7:57 p.m. by

The Maritime Executive

The Port of Venice and Italian authorities continue to seek a solution to the challenges of welcoming cruise ships while honoring their commitment to ban large ships from Venice’s sensitive lagoon and fragile canals. In a controversial decision, the port last weekend for the first time approved a test of anchoring a large cruise ship outside the lagoon and picking up passengers ashore for a long day visit.


Norwegian Cruise Line received permission from port officials to anchor the 93,500 gross tons norwegian gem near Venice on Saturday July 23, the last day of a 7-day Eastern Mediterranean and Greek Isles cruise. The cruise ship, which is believed to be traveling with around 1,500 passengers, has organized three Venice tour boats to transport passengers to the city centre.


Italian authorities last year banned all large cruise ships from entering the canal and traveling to the passenger terminal after years of protests from environmentalists and conservationists who argued that the cruise ship waves were damage to historic buildings. In recent years, Venice has seen an increase in flooding, particularly at high tide, made worse by the wake of large ships. To reach the cruise ship terminals, ships had to pass historic St. Mark’s Square.


Cruise passengers have been told their ships may divert to the nearby industrial port of Marghera, which however lacks facilities for cruise passengers. Many cruise lines, including Norwegian Cruise Line, have instead chosen to start and end their cruises in the port of Trieste, which has terminals but is a longer bus journey to reach Venice.


As part of the pilot tested with the norwegian gem, embarkation and disembarkation for the cruise continue to take place on Sundays in Trieste, while on Saturdays they called on the last full day of the cruise so that passengers could visit Venice. This approach only works for stopover cruise ships and not for homeport cruises.


Critics were quick to dismiss the test, however. Simone Venturini, the town’s tourism adviser, told local reporters: “This is not the type of tourism we want for the town.” It represents a side of the argument that seeks to focus on tourists who visit the city for days and stay in hotels. Venturini warned against what he calls “hit and run” tourism.


Cruise lines said they had no solid alternative when Italy suddenly announced the ban last july. At the time, Italy said it was seeking proposals for a new cruise terminal near Venice that would provide facilities while meeting the goal of keeping large ships out of local waterways and canals. The cruise industry points out that it will take years for the new facility to be developed.


From 2023, Venice will also impose a daily rate on all visitors to the city. The cost to tourists will vary depending on the number of people booked to visit the city, with officials saying this should help control crowds and provide an important source of revenue for the upkeep of the city. In 2019, they calculated that 19 million people visited the city, 80% of whom stayed for just one day.


Tourism management efforts continue to spread to many popular destinations around the world. In 2020, Key West residents voted to ban large cruise ships with controls on how many people could come to town each day on the ships, only to have the state governor retroactively cancel their vote. In Bar Harbor, Maine residents are now asking the city council to also limit the daily number of cruise winners, while in 2022 French Polynesia imposed restrictions to limit cruise ships to certain ports.

Free rental cars, restaurant dining and celebrity chefs: How all-inclusive vacations have gone upmarket

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OWhen was the last time you went all inclusive? In certain scenarios – when you want to read by the pool, relax in the sun, or stick to a budget, for example – they can be handy. But the brilliance of throwing it all away has dulled in recent decades, with many AI stalwarts now seen as crummy, incentivizing, or limiting to the reasonably curious traveler.

In response, hotel brands haven’t abandoned the concept of AI – they’ve decided to up their game. Enter a new generation of “more inclusive”, “cool inclusive” and “infinite lifestyle” rates, adding luxury facilities, free activities, and even dinner and drive around the destination to the worn-out concept of three buffet meals and unlimited drinks.

Ikos Resorts is one of the most visible companies shaking up the traditional all-inclusive concept. His Ikos Olivia Hotel in Halkidiki appealed to luxury family travelers when it opened in 2015 with its lavish, tasteful interiors and fancier-than-usual a la carte restaurants. Now with six resorts across Greece and Spain, it has its AI formula down to an art: one upfront rate with the same benefits for all guests; a la carte restaurants with menus designed by Michelin-starred chefs; 30 minutes of free babysitting; 24-hour room service; free museum tickets; several swimming pools; and hundreds of wines selected by a sommelier in the hotel cellar. Guests even have access to a shiny Ikos-branded Mini to get around for a day of their stay. (The newest outpost, Ikos Andalusia, will soon receive 50 Teslas delivered for low-impact exploration of the region.)



At first we really struggled to use the words “all inclusive” as the connotations can be negative

Lee Barker, Ikos Resorts

One of its most high-profile features is the “Dine Out” option, where guests can dine at a partner restaurant, such as a traditional Greek taverna elsewhere on the island, with the meal included in their rate. It’s a new approach – sending people to a destination and plugging them into the local scene, rather than keeping them there as a captive, spendthrift audience. The station even drops them off and picks them up.

TRS Ibiza sends its Signature Level guests for dinners around the island

(Palladium Hotels)

Another hotel brand partnering with independent restaurants is TRS, a sub-brand of Palladium Hotels. This summer, he is launching “The Signature Level”, which offers guests of certain room categories additional benefits included. At TRS Ibiza Hotel these include the possibility of dining in a rustic Ibizan agrotourismsflash beach clubs or sushi bars elsewhere on the island, plus free entry to a typically off-limits VIP area, the Gravity Sky Lounge, during the day, plus early check-in and late check-out. VIP guests also have access to events at the entertainment institutions Ushuaïa Ibiza Beach Hotel, Hard Rock Hotel Ibiza and Hï Ibiza.

Elsewhere in the Mediterranean, upscale resort brand Domes has launched its family-friendly Aulūs branch, “reserved only for those who want upscale accommodation, access to all areas, superior service, a private lounge and upscale living. range”. two stations, Aulus Elounda Domes in Crete and Aulus Zante Domes in Zakynthos, launched earlier this month. Domes’ approach is to have two tiers: a more modest, affordable all-inclusive fare — with buffet-style dining, for example, in its chic, modern five-star facilities — and a “Cool Living” tier that includes the pool access and private and clubby dining areas, plus luxury food and beverage events, from wine tastings to picnics and sunset parties.

The original game-changer, Ikos, was a concept hatched by the owners of Sani Resort in Halkidiki – not an all-inclusive, but a popular resort and a good barometer for what affluent beachgoers were looking for. “At first we really struggled with the words ‘all-inclusive’, as the connotations can be negative,” says Lee Barker, Group Regional Sales Manager for the UK. “People feel like you lose quality as soon as you have that label. But there was a gap, you know?

Ikos Resorts lends you a Mini or a Tesla for a discovery day

(Ikos Resorts)

“Before, if you said you were going to an all-inclusive in Europe, you received a mixed reaction,” he continues. “We said, if we’re going to do all-inclusive, we’re going to do it best. No guest will leave the resort unsatisfied.

One key thing that came out of this stage of development, he says, is the “no surprises” factor. No Ikos customer knows which restaurant they can use at what time, no dishes on the menus are marked as costing extra, and they can dine on restaurant food on their terrace – the only thing they would Never charged is an optional spa treatment. Another pillar was “quality”, applying to everything from interiors to food and drink – including “brands you’d recognize, premium spirits and mixers such as Fevertree” – and products like their own olive oil, honey and wine produced by the group’s Greek suppliers.



No Ikos customer knows which restaurant they can use at what time, no dish on the menus is indicated as costing extra and they can dine on the restaurant’s terrace.

Maybe after months and years of travel contingencies, vacationers want to sew everything up nicely before boarding their flight? For families in particular, the ski pass becomes a real asset, once the quality of the environment and the experience have been assured.

“I’m actually a big convert,” says Katie Bowman, globetrotting editor of family traveler magazine. “I’ll be blunt – I wouldn’t choose an all-inclusive if I didn’t have kids, but I love them when traveling with my daughter. It just takes the guilt, politics, and money out of eating, which is so important when tough kid meals can make or break a night out.

“I especially like the newer trendy restaurants – Ikos Corfu, Amada Colossos Rhodes, Lujo Bodrum, Rixos Abu Dhabi – where the restaurants offer local chefs and a la carte menus.”

Mexico’s Unico 20°87° is another resort claiming to have reinvented all-inclusive for a new generation

(Single 20°87°)

High-end AI is nothing new in remote and long-haul destinations where everything must be offered in-station. Tahiti’s megabucks The Brandon resort does all-inclusive, while Anantara Maia Seychelles offers in-villa yoga, unlimited scuba diving, and “private dining anywhere on the grounds” as part of its rate. the recent opening of Mexico, 20°87°, an adults-only resort in the Riviera Maya, also claimed to be “reinventing all-inclusive” with its celebrity chef restaurant, free poolside food service, and local craft experiences. In Europe, however, it looks like an emerging and thriving market.



I wouldn’t choose an all inclusive if I didn’t have kids, but I like them when I travel with my daughter

Katie Bowman, family traveler

The trade-off, unsurprisingly, is fairly high rates – rooms at Ikos start at £300 a night, in low season, but that can rise to £700-800 in high season. Domes Aulus resorts offer rooms from £160 per night in low season on their AI base rate; more like £268 per night for the ‘Cool Inclusive’ premium.

With two new resorts in the works – a second in Corfu and a new one in Mallorca – Ikos’ Lee Barker says what the premium all-inclusive crowd wants next is more space. The group is increasing the number of suites with terraces, bungalows and villas in new and existing resorts. “Customers want more space, more privacy, that’s what we’ve learned. In 2023 we will introduce five villas in Ikos Porto Petro (Majorca), with access to the facilities of the complex”, he explains. But for the most part, it’s more or less the same thing – applying the winning formula to as many places as it fits.

So when is the next time you will book an all inclusive package? Turns out, this might be more your (luxury, loose-leaf) cup of tea than you think.

Feds Sue Poultry Farmers Over Unfair Worker Practices

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FILE – Chicken is displayed in a market in Pittsburgh, July 12, 2022. The Justice Department is expected to file a lawsuit and propose a settlement against some of the largest poultry producers in the United States. This is part of an effort to end what the government has long claimed are deceptive and abusive practices for workers. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File)

PA

The Justice Department is expected to file a lawsuit against some of the largest poultry producers in the United States, along with a proposed settlement to end what it says are longstanding deceptive and abusive practices. for workers.

The suit is being filed in federal court in Maryland, naming Cargill, Sanderson Farms and Wayne Farms, as well as a data consulting firm known as Weber, Meng, Sahl and Co., according to three people familiar with the matter. The people were unable to publicly discuss specific details of the lawsuit before the filing became public and spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity.

In its lawsuit, the Department of Justice alleges that the companies engaged in a multi-year conspiracy to exchange information on wages and benefits of workers in poultry processing plants in order to reduce competition for employees in the market. , the people said.

The government says the data consultancy has helped share workers’ compensation information with companies and their executives, the sources said. By implementing the scheme, officials say companies were able to compete less for workers and reduce the amount of money and benefits they had to offer their employees, removing competition for processing workers. poultry at all levels, the people said.

The unnamed defendants and co-conspirators in the lawsuit account for about 90% of all chicken processing jobs in the country, one of the people said.

The lawsuit is the latest example of the Justice Department’s antitrust enforcement targeting companies that the government says engage in anticompetitive behavior to stifle workers or harm consumers. It also comes as the ministry pursues a wider investigation into labor abuses in the poultry industry.

The lawsuit is filed with a proposed consent decree — a settlement that would require companies to pay $84.8 million in compensation for workers who were harmed by the illegal information-sharing network, the authorities said. people.

The regulations would also put in place a federal comptroller selected by the Department of Justice who would ensure compliance for the next decade. The consent decree would also allow attorneys and Justice Department investigators to inspect poultry processors’ facilities and interview their employees to ensure they are following the terms, the people said.

The suit comes as Cargill and Continental Grain – of which Wayne Farms is a subsidiary – formed a joint venture to acquire Sanderson Farms, paying $203 per share in cash for a company that last year turned more than $4.8 billion into pounds of meat.

The companies plan to combine Sanderson Farms with Wayne Farms to form a new private poultry business. Operations will include poultry processing plants and prepared food plants across Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina and Texas.

Wayne Farms has over 9,000 employees. It manufactures products under brands such as Wayne Farms Fresh and Prepared Chicken, Platinum Harvest Premium Fresh Chicken, Chef’s Craft Gourmet Chicken, Naked Truth Premium Chicken and Ladybirdy Premium Chicken.

Based in Laurel, Mississippi, Sanderson Farms has 17,000 employees and 12 plants. It processes 13.6 million chickens per week.

The proposed consent decree would also resolve allegations that Sanderson Farms and Wayne Farms treated chicken farmers unfairly by using a system that reduced their pay for poor performance.

Farmers sign contracts to raise the chickens and processing companies provide the birds and feed. Their remuneration is then determined by the performance of the farmers compared to other chicken farmers. The Department of Justice alleges that the companies’ use of this method of compensation, known as the “tournament system”, has resulted in their failure to provide information to farmers to assess and manage their financial risk.

Typically, chicken farmers enter into long-term contracts with meat companies that farmers say lock them into agreements that set their remuneration at unprofitable levels.

Under the settlement, Sanderson Farms and Wayne Farms would be prohibited from reducing base payments to chicken farmers to penalize them for underperformance, the people said. The consent decree would, however, allow companies to offer incentives and bonuses to producers, the people say.

The proposed consent decree is filed in the lawsuit on Monday. Under federal law, the proposal would also be published in the Federal Register and there would be a 60-day period for people to send comments to the Justice Department before a court could accept and finalize the deal.

___

This story has been corrected to show that the settlement calls for a return of $84.8 million, not $84.4 million.

Short-term rentals booming | eKathimerini.com

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The short-term rental sector in Greece is recovering at the fastest pace on a pan-European level, following the general course of tourism this year.

According to AirDNA’s latest monthly survey, demand for short-term rentals during the summer season – based on bookings made for the months of July, August and September – saw a 26.5% increase over to the corresponding period of 2019. It is the best performances across the continent.

Thus, in June, the increase in overnight stays in Greece since 2019 is 27.2%, followed by Germany with 26.1% and France with an increase of 17.5%. Compared to the corresponding month of 2021, the increase in demand in Greece reached 99.6%, placing the country in third place, behind only Croatia, where the increase in overnight stays reached 131.8%, and Norway, with an increase of 117%.

In a recent presentation by AirDNA Vice President of Research, Jamie Lane, to an online update from the Greek section of ULI (Urban Land Institute), it emerged that the region registering the highest increase in demand compared to 2019, is the Dodecanese in the southeast of the Aegean Sea with 46.8%.

It is followed by the Cyclades with an increase of 43.8%, Epirus with 38.9%, the Ionian Islands with 35.6% and Crete with 36.2%.

Looking at individual regions, leading demand for this summer is Kos with an increase of 101.7% over 2019, followed by Tinos with a booking increase of 59.7%, Santorini with 58, 3%, Corfu (57.2%) and Zakynthos (51.7%). %), while in Rhodes the increase reached 44.7%. In the Cyclades, a significant increase is also recorded in Naxos with 51.5%, Milos with 50.4% and Mykonos with 38.8%.

On the contrary, compared to 2019, the demand for the center of Athens is only 1.4% higher. It’s an indication that while the capital’s market is now back to pre-pandemic levels, most overseas visitors prefer an island destination, at least this year.

Renting a vacation home with friends might seem like the perfect escape, but beware

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Have you ever seen A Bigger Splash? It’s a vacation (disaster) movie set on the small Italian island of Pantelleria, where reclusive rock star Marianne (played by Tilda Swinton) and her boyfriend have rented a beautiful house to enjoy a quiet and relaxing. Just the two of them.

Then Ralph Fiennes’ character, Harry, shows up and everything goes wrong. He swims naked in the pool, gets splashed around all the time, flirts, makes a scene at the supermarket, shows up at the village ball, talks loudly and obnoxiously at local restaurants, and plays Rolling Stones records too loudly on the hi- fi of the villa. , strutting around the kitchen like a moron.

To make matters worse, he begins to invite friends over as if it were his own house and monopolizes the schedule by insisting on endless sightseeing excursions. Oh, and Harry’s precocious, smokin’ daughter (Dakota Johnson) sleeps with Marianne’s boyfriend…who then (spoiler alert!) drowns Harry in the pool. You saw him ? Well, a few summers ago my girlfriend and I rented this same house from Pantelleria.

Simon Mills explains why vacationing with friends isn’t always a good idea. UK-based writer describes incident of infidelity during group holiday he was attending

Just the two of us, like Marianne and her boyfriend had done. And it was total happiness. Only with no Harry-style guests to worry about, no pool murders to interrupt our cooking, reclining, reclining, swimming, sunbathing, reading and taking our little Citroen rental car on a trip around the volcanic wonders and magical coves of Pantelleria .

A holiday like this, we decided during this heavenly week, was far too good to share with a group of Harrys. Our days of cohabitation in the villa were well and truly over. The hell of a vacation, we agreed, is other people.

My ex-wife and I (with our teenage children) once stayed in a villa in Majorca with two other couples, waking up one night to a huge argument. The villa host’s husband, thinking his wife had gone to bed, started smooching another man’s wife (he was also sleeping) in the swimming pool and was scolded by one of his stray children and insomniacs, who quickly informed her mother. All this around 2am. Chaos ensued; screams, doors slamming, the sound of rental car engines revving, bags being packed and wheeled suitcases dragged hastily across the gravel. In the morning, there were only three adults left.

Back home, divorce papers were issued soon after, but the incident also turned out to be something of a Balearic villa cooler. While the temperature hit 30 degrees in the resort, things stayed remarkably cool around our pool.

We knew he was taking money. But, being British, we kept quiet

Bringing together a cast of characters for a short, hot, but intense period creates a micro-community where expectations and emotions run high. You not only agree to have a vacation, but also take on the most undesirable roles of tour guide, personal shopper, butler, matchmaker, caterer, nurse, ringmaster, redcoat and janitor. Is anyone grateful? No. No. Ochi.

The good news about villa sharing is that you can split the costs – that’s the theory, anyway. The reality may be somewhat different. We once shared a villa with a guest boy from town who decided to play banker for the fortnight, putting on a great show collecting the split money when the dinner check for 15 came and doing the accounts from the villa when we rented a boat one day. . It soon became clear that he was taking 100 euros from each transaction. We all knew. And he knew that we knew. It was very embarrassing. Of course being British the rest of us said nothing but there was an unspoken agreement that the fun we had chatting about her around the pool was well worth the money we had lost.

You might think, meanwhile, that being invited as a villa guest (villa filler, if you will) rather than being the host is the way to avoid these misfortunes. Not so. Let’s take the example of my friends who were invited for a five-day break in a beautiful house in Mustique. All they had to do was get there (London to Saint Lucia or Barbados then a twin-propeller transfer). Accommodation would be provided free of charge, lunches prepared by knowledgeable house staff and they would be transported around the island in the owners’ spare air-conditioned 4×4. How could they resist a free vacation on the jewel of the Caribbean island made famous by Mick Jagger and Princess Margaret?

Ralph Fiennes and Tilda Swinton show the dangers of villa sharing in A Bigger Splash.  Ralph Fiennes' character, Harry, shows up and everything goes wrong.

Ralph Fiennes and Tilda Swinton show the dangers of villa sharing in A Bigger Splash. Ralph Fiennes’ character, Harry, shows up and everything goes wrong.

The problems started when my friends were told they should tip the staff. Not only that, but the host, it turned out, had already taken the liberty of doing this on their behalf. They were asked to transfer a thousand pounds to the wife’s account before they arrived. Or better yet, bring cash.

Then there was the hosts’ impromptu birthday party on the beach – a private BBQ – burgers and ribs for 15 people (all previously unknown to my friends). My friends thought it would be a nice gesture, an obligation really, if they offered to pay. It cost them an additional £1,500. Initially, the hosts insisted that my friends bring a few heavy bags (their excess luggage in this case) back to London because the battalion of family suitcases wouldn’t fit on the private plane. It ended up costing my friends an extra £400 – not rich people. Total cost of vacation, with very expensive flights? About nine thousand dollars. And it rained most of the time. And they never met Mick. You just don’t get that kind of two-man drama. We can eat what we like, when we want, have full access to all four seats in the car, and sometimes walk around naked.

As a couple, we can dive into the walk-in restaurants rather than calling ahead every night to ask for a table for 12 or 15 and being told the only time slots they have are 6:30 or 10:30 p.m.

If we are lucky enough to find ourselves in a property in Milos or Menorca with a free room or two, we have learned to be choosy – bearing in mind what happened in Ibiza a few years. During this special holiday in a villa, one of our guests took the initiative to ask another of her friends, totally unknown to us, to stay… maybe indefinitely? A thuggish, deeply tanned single woman in a sarong and Birkenstocks duly introduced herself, put down her small bag and didn’t introduce herself, probably because she thought we all knew her. She sat with us for meals, slept on a lounge chair at night, was out late in the nightclub, and contributed nothing in the way of money or cooking chores. Then one day we woke up to find her gone. I never knew his name. I never saw her again.

Ben Elliot, founder of concierge brand Quintessentially, remembers a guest at a holiday home in Corfu who “everyone thought was someone else’s friend”. It turned out that no one knew them. In the end, Ben chased them out of the house with a water gun. “They were so lost,” he said, “that they thought it was a real gun.”

So, like I said, the only surefire way to avoid villa-fication this summer is to avoid inviting or being a guest. When the phrase “come and see us in Sardinia” comes to mind, just make sure that’s where it stays.

Happy Holidays!

‘I wanted every decision to be made for me’: Corfu vacation package | Travel

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ODuring the pandemic, I sat in my house and dreamed of a vacation. I sat in my house, the same chair, the same view, the same fights over the same toys, and over the months I refined that dream. Some people fantasized about trekking through the Himalayas. Some talk about exploring the jungle, paddling a secluded beach, or dashing through Manhattan. I wanted a place where I wouldn’t have to cook. I wanted a holiday where every decision was made for me, where we could make up for some of the panic of lockdown by laying carefree in the sun, some of the lack of childcare of lockdown by sending the kids to play in a room which also did not contain us. I wanted an all-inclusive family resort, a warm place, and I really wanted it.

So, having started lazily scrolling through the options in 2020, two treacherous years later, there I was, on a package deal to Corfu. We hadn’t been on vacation for three years: a lot depended on that. I was traveling with my family, including a toddler born at the start of the first confinement, who had never taken a vacation in his life. We were curious to see what he would think of swimming pools, other people, what he would think of the sea and being lifted 31,000 feet in the air while next to him a stranger watched Friends without helmet. It turned out that the answer was: I liked it.

The resort was called MarBella (pronounced with a hard L) and was on the southeast coast of Corfu, a sprawling complex of buildings surrounded by various lavenders and rosemary and crowned by a colorful water park. Every 10 minutes or so, a giant bucket of water would tip over and pour down from the top of the water park, soaking those below the slides, whose delighted cries raced down the hill to the other two pools, one quietly placed at arm’s length from all shenanigans, where only adults were allowed. My partner and I glared at him.

Sun, sea and a change of scenery: the hotel beach. Photography: Heinz Troll

The morning after our arrival, we were introduced to the hotel’s ‘catering concept’, ie the buffet. I had known the joy of a life-changing buffet breakfast in the past, but never had my family had the chance to go all-inclusive before, which meant we never had does ‘dinner buffet’ too. It’s hard to go back on that, I’ll be honest. And for all the kid-centric fun—a kids’ club, pottery sessions, water slides, Lego robotics lessons—for my kids, the prospect of independently sliding through three aisles of potential diners has it all. beaten. Those early days for them were just surveillance between buffets. There was a piece of do-it-yourself sundae and a whole aisle of desserts – the big kid waddled the little kid into the restaurant and held him up to gaze at the puddings. They came back with a tasting menu of cold things in small pots, often with cream, sometimes delicious. I felt sorry for the chefs – who served a hotel full of British families, their local dishes were largely shunned by anyone under 16, each eating plain pasta with cheese every night. But despite that, everyone was floating on an equally magical all-inclusive cloud: after all those months of confinement meals, being cooked for was a strangely moving experience.

The goal was to relax. I had a vision of lying very still in dappled shade, a state of lobotomized serenity. There were times when I almost made it, even with a sleeping child draped in sweat over my bikini, or on the balcony quite late at night. But despite all the splendor and imposed pleasure, I realized on the third day that there was unfortunately not much a hotel could do. They can provide good food, they can clean the rooms, they can plant bougainvillea to climb the arches, they can set up a small counter by a swimming pool where clean towels are available on request, but the rest, well, that’s up to you. On a family vacation, you can escape your home, but you can’t really escape your family. So after a few days we gave up trying; we were so inexperienced in the art of relaxation that we decided to wake up from the all-inclusive dream and embark on a whole different kind of vacation.

At the restaurant: tables outside the excellent street restaurants (try the grilled fish).
At the restaurant: tables outside the excellent street restaurants (try the grilled fish). Photography: Poike/Getty Images

We left the compound and took a bus to the old town of Corfu with its wide white marble pavements, slippery under a sandal, and its maze-like alleys, and its rocks leading to the Adriatic Sea, and its ancient fortresses, and its ice-creams. On our return to the hotel, we skipped the buffet and ventured to tavernas on the coast, where we ate grilled fish by the water’s edge. And eventually, we also avoided the pool and its cheery aerobics classes, heading for a nearby pebble beach, where, in the fantasy, I’d have ripped off my dress and jumped screaming into the sea. I had to apply everyone’s sunscreen, then take a series of long minutes to climb the small ladder, then dove into the cold sea water, moaning, but it was worth it. I swam, a modest distance, and looked back – on one side I saw the hotel, white and glistening in the heat, on the other side, the mountains, covered with bushes greens and lilacs. The best of both.

Fantasies have multiplied during the pandemic, rocking marriages, changing careers and sending people like me to the long sandy beaches in their heads.

As the world comes back to life, I predict a shift away from vacation rentals and towards all-inclusive vacations, where one can be taken care of in ways we have been missing. The problem with chasing a fantasy is that reality is never quite what you imagined. But sometimes it can be even better.

A 7 night stay with Jet2holidays at MarBella Corfu costs £649 pp half board, based on 2 adults and 1 child (aged 2-11) sharing. For more details, go to (marbella.gr)

When does the last episode of Love Island 2022 air?

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the island of love has once again captured the attention of millions in the UK as Series 8 begins to approach its endpoint.

the island of love Series 8 has already been going on for a month and a half, having started on June 6, and some may be wondering when the finale will be scheduled.

Here’s all the information you’ll need to watch the anticipated final episode.

Love Island continues Sunday at 9 p.m. on ITV2 and ITV Hub. Episodes are available the following morning on BritBox (ITV)

When will the Love Island 2022 finale air?

The last episode of love island 2022 will air on Monday, August 1, as reported by The Subway.

In the show’s first episode, presenter Laura Whitmore said the program would run for eight weeks, bringing it back to that August date.

The sixth series, which aired in 2021, also ran for a full eight weeks, beginning June 28 and ending August 23.

The finale is also expected to last a bit longer than a standard episode, as the 2021 series ran for 95 minutes.

The standout episode typically sees the public vote on four remaining couples, decide on their favorite romance and choose who they want to win the £50,000 cash prize.

Usually, the relationship born in the winning couple’s villa is put to the test, as they each select one of two envelopes – one of which grants the holder the full prize.

So far no one has decided to keep the money all to themselves, but that may be the year that will change.

Passengers launched the plane after the crew expired, the plane still flew away

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  • A TUI plane flew from Greece to Scotland with no passengers, MailOnline reported.
  • The passengers were kicked off the plane because the crew had worked too many hours, according to the report.
  • Their flight was delayed by 1pm and TUI was unable to provide accommodation for the night.

The passengers were kicked off a plane by British airline TUI because the crew had worked too many hours – but the plane flew without them anyway, according to a MailOnline report.

The flight from the Greek island of Corfu to Aberdeen, Scotland – originally scheduled for 10.15pm on July 22 – was initially delayed for a few hours, which a TUI spokesperson said was linked to ‘operational disruption’ .

But after the passengers took a shuttle bus to board the plane, they were told to return to the terminal as the captain had exceeded his legal working hours limit, passenger Steve Dongworth told MailOnline. He said TUI staff later told him it was actually the cabin crew, not the pilot, who expired.

Passengers were given a new flight time of 1.45pm on July 23, MailOnline reported – more than 13 hours after the original flight was scheduled to depart. FlightRadar 24 data confirms the flight was scheduled for this time.

Dongworth told MailOnline that while he was waiting at the airport he checked the FlightRadar24 flight tracking app and saw that the plane had in fact departed at 3.44am and made the journey to the Scotland. Insider confirmed via FlightRadar 24 and FlightAware that the plane departed at that time and flew to Aberdeen.

“The plane still had to return to the UK as it would then impact other flights,” the TUI spokesperson told Insider. “Passengers could not fly on this plane because there was no crew to operate the flight.”

TUI was unable to provide overnight accommodation for passengers awaiting their rescheduled flight. Dongworth said they were left to sleep on the floor in the departure lounge.

‘We were told those who wanted to leave could do so but would not be allowed to re-enter the gate until they checked in for the new flight,’ Dongworth told MailOnline, adding that he did not want to. not go around Corfu so late at night.

“Unfortunately, the lack of hotel availability in the area meant that we were unable to find overnight accommodation for guests as we normally would in these circumstances,” the TUI spokesperson told Insider.

The airline told affected passengers that they would not be able to access their checked bags during the delay, according to a screenshot of an email from TUI that Dongworth shared on Twitter.

Dongworth told MailOnline the airline only offered him sandwiches during the delay, but a TUI spokesperson told Insider staff handed out water and meal vouchers to passengers.

The flight was eventually delayed again, departing at 3:57 p.m. on July 23, according to data from FlightRadar 24.

The spokesperson told Insider that TUI had kept passengers informed as it worked on a new flight plan and provided them with details on how to claim compensation under EU rules.

“We are doing everything we can to keep customers away as planned and, while instances like this are rare, we recognize that we have not met our usually high standards and apologize again,” said the spokesperson.

Historical Fictions: Between Constantinople, Smyrna and New York

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It was November 1920, a fateful month for us Venizelists. Our national hero, our national leader, lost the election to those pesky royalists. The loss was unexpected, a great shock to all of us in Constantinople (La Polis) and Smyrna.

Our family operated a successful import/export business in Constantinople with branches in Smyrna, Trebizond, Athens, Salonica and New York. Our branch in Trebizond could not trade because the Turks had closed it. Be that as it may, we did well during those troubled years of 1919-22. We belonged to Hellenic Polis organizations that had been operating freely since we were under occupation by British, French and Italian forces. The sultan and his government remained silent during this period. Allied guns were pointed directly at his palace. The ordinary Turk went about his daily life without complaining.

After Venizelos’ defeat, many prominent Venizelist officers and partisans took up residence in Constantinople. They did not want to live under the royalist boot. Many remembered the royalist persecutions before and after the Anglo-French landings in early December 1916. We decided to form an organization to establish an autonomous state in Asia Minor, including some of our islands off the coast of Asia Minor under the direction of our Patriarch. We wanted to separate from the Greece of King Constantine.

We held our first of many meetings at the Frangidis restaurant to establish an executive committee and lay the groundwork for our future goal of autonomy. Our committee of fourteen was made up of clerics, merchants, bankers, doctors, teachers, and ordinary people interested in our mission. Ioannis Papadopoulos, a successful banker, first proposed that our autonomy should be under the Sultan and later united with Greece when Venizelos returned to power. The motion passed unanimously and became the cornerstone of our policy. Our organization was called the Asia Minor Defense League.

At our meeting on March 20, 1921, we split the organization into civilian and military branches. The former would be involved in fundraising, conducting talks with Allied leaders through Venizelos and the latter would recruit Greeks from Asia Minor and soldiers from our regular army to defend our Autonomous Zone. My biggest concern was whether the great powers would be sympathetic to our cause or not. Time would provide us with an answer.

The London conference was unsuccessful for the royalists, as the allies were prepared to modify the Treaty of Sèvres in favor of the Kemalists. The royalists then announced that they would easily crush the Kemalists. Our organization feared royalist claims to defeat Mustapha Kemal in the depths of Asia Minor. For a time, however, the royalists’ demands defied our expectations, with military successes at Brusa, Afyon Karahissar and EskiShehr. We thought Ankara would fall to our knees with Mustapha Kemal seeking refuge in Azerbaijan.

At this point, we were happy with our victories and the fact that Smyrna would finally remain Greek. As our army marched on Ankara, we eagerly awaited news of our occupation of the Kemalist capital. However, things did not turn out the way we expected. The Kemalists defended their capital with great determination, pushing us back to the Afyon Karahissar-Eskishehr defensive line, leading to a military stalemate which did not bode well for our position in Asia Minor. We had to accelerate our autonomy plans.

A delegation was sent to Smyrna from Constantinople in October 1921 to establish a branch of our organization in that beautiful and prosperous city. Dr. Christos Psaltof and Antonis Beinoglou were our representatives there. Psaltof was well known and well connected in the Greek community of Smyrniot and could help recruit locals to join our defense force. The biggest obstacle to our plans was the Greek High Commissioner, Aristidis Sterghiadis, who opposed our organization. We set up a meeting with him to try to explain our plans, only to show us the door.

In March 1922, the Allies decided that our army should evacuate Asia Minor. We sent a delegation to Athens to discuss the Greek government‘s evacuation plans and their impact on our compatriots. The royalists told us that they would not support us and would leave us to our own devices. They didn’t care about us and betrayed us. During this time we had received support for our home rule plans from Venizelos, Sir John Stavridis and British Prime Minister Lloyd George. Sterghiadis changed his mind and decided to support our movement together with the Commander-in-Chief of the Army of Asia Minor, General Papoulas. Unfortunately, the latter was replaced by the Jester (Hadjianestis) in May. Papoulas would have made a good commander of our autonomous army and would also have had personal differences with the king and the royalist administration.

The Allies opposed our plans, so we turned our hope to the United States. In June, I traveled with two other members to seek financial assistance from our Greek-American community and support from the US government. When we arrived in New York, reporters from the National Herald, Atlantis and the New York Times interviewed us at our hotel for our mission to the United States. We explained that the Christian population of Asia Minor risked extermination if Mustapha Kemal won the war. We needed money and weapons to defend ourselves. Ordinary Americans and the churches were sympathetic to our cause while the US government wanted no involvement in Middle Eastern affairs.

We arrived in Washington seeking meetings with congressmen, senators and the White House, but were turned away by them. We have learned that American churches are sending resolutions to the State Department and the White House urging their government to protect Christians from Turkish reprisals. Our fellow Greek Americans sent money to the National Herald and Atlantis to help our cause. Some of them volunteered to join our army as some had roots in Asia Minor.

At the end of July, we read articles from American and Greek-American newspapers about the announcement by Sterghiadis on the steps of the Greek High Commission of the autonomy of Smyrna under the suzerainty of the sultan. Excitement was etched on our faces. Little did we know that within about six weeks our smiles would turn to bitter tears upon learning of our military defeat in Asia Minor and the burning of Smyrna by the Kemalists.

Our organization did everything to achieve autonomy, but without the support of the great powers and in particular of the Greek government, it was doomed to failure.

Turkey is no longer the cheapest holiday destination – here’s where to go instead

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The Post Office’s Nick Boden said: ‘The recent fall in sterling against European currencies means it will be crucial for families to keep tight control over resort spending this summer to avoid breaking the vacation budget.

“We also found that prices can vary significantly between resorts in the same country. In Greece, for example, barometer costs were 17% lower in Corfu than in Crete.”

The Italian region of Puglia and the Spanish island of Ibiza were the most expensive holidays on the Beach Barometer, with the basket of goods costing £186 at each location. Items studied also included lounge chairs, alcohol, and water rides.

However, Puglia and Ibiza were among the only three destinations where prices fell compared to 2019, down around 5%. Hotel prices in Mallorca also fell, down 3%.

Portugal’s Algarve and Spain’s Costa del Sol rank among the cheapest destinations in the Eurozone, at £108 and £127 respectively on the Beach Barometer.

The Post Office also found that families continued to overspend their vacation budget by nearly two-fifths. The costliest holiday habit was eating out, which was the highest cost abroad. He said children’s ‘stalking power’ was partly to blame for the overspending, with parents giving in to demands for ice cream, theme park visits and beach equipment such as buckets and shovels.

The price increases come as families face severe travel disruptions in the first unrestricted summer since the pandemic began. Major airports are on lockdown, with hundreds of flights canceled at the last minute and holidaymakers stranded abroad.

Cheapest European summer holiday destinations revealed

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British holidaymakers flying away for the summer school holidays are likely to find the best prices in Bulgaria and Turkey.

Sunny Beach, Bulgaria, and Marmaris, Turkey, are the cheapest of the 16 most popular European resorts, according to Post Office Travel Money’s Annual Family Vacation Report.

The report’s Beach Barometer, produced with travel agency Tui, estimated a cost of around £86 for 12 common holiday expenses, including a family meal, drinks, sunscreen, insect repellent and beach items ranging from buckets and shovels to lilos, ice cream, and paddle boat rides at both destinations.

Destinations in Bulgaria and Turkey have been found to be the cheapest in Europe (PA/ Nick Ansell)

The report suggests that local prices have doubled in Marmaris compared to summer 2019, but the collapse of the Turkish lira since then has helped lessen the impact.

However, Brits can expect to pay almost 11% more than three years ago in Maramaris, compared to 8% in Sunny Beach.

Despite the hikes, costs in both destinations were more than 20 per cent lower than the cheapest Eurozone resort, Portugal’s Algarve, which came in at £108 for the 12 items.

Funchal, Madeira was the second cheapest at £125, followed by Costa Del Sol, Spain, at £127 and Corfu, Greece, at £133.

The most expensive was Ibiza, costing around £186 on the barometer, followed by Puglia, Italy, at around £185.

However, prices have fallen in Ibiza and Puglia since 2019, by 4.9% and 5.2% respectively.

The biggest price increase was seen in Crete with a 37.7% rise in prices, now costing around £161.

The report shows prices rose in three-quarters of the 16 European destinations included due to higher resort fees for food and drink and a falling value of the pound sterling.

The average increase among those who experienced increases was 13.3%.

British tourists are suffering a recent fall in the value of the pound, which is currently trading at 1.17 euros after hitting a 2022 high of 1.21 euros in April.

Nick Boden, head of Post Office Travel Money, which accounts for one in four foreign exchange transactions in the UK, said: “The recent fall in the pound sterling against European currencies and the continued uncertainty about its performance in the Coming weeks mean keeping a tight rein on resort spending will be crucial for families this summer to avoid breaking the vacation budget.

“We saw wide price variations across the 16 destinations surveyed, particularly across 13 Eurozone resorts. This makes it all the more important that holidaymakers do their homework and budget carefully to cover resort costs. holidays they visit. We also found that prices can vary significantly between resorts within the same country. In Greece, for example, barometer costs were 17% lower in Corfu than in Crete.

The report also revealed that almost three in five families (59%) are planning trips abroad this year, but more than three-quarters (76%) of them have cut their budget by almost 38% during their last vacation, spending an extra £243 on the average £644 budget they had set for themselves.

Killer of Vancouver man should get 10 years, judge told

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John McIver has been found dead at an appliance repair business in Vancouver that he ran for 50 years.

The man who pleaded guilty to killing longtime Vancouver businessman John McIver should be sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole for 10 years, the Supreme Court has ruled. British Columbia on July 22.

John McIver was found dead at his South Vancouver appliance repair business in June 2019. He had run the business for 50 years.

Brian Roger Holt, a former McIver’s employee, has pleaded guilty to second degree murder of the 78-year-old, who was found dead by a family member.

Judge Kathleen Ker heard the Agreed Statement of Facts presented in court by Crown Attorney Brendan McCabe and defense attorney Jim Heller.

McCabe said Holt worked at McIver’s Appliance Service and Sales, located near Ontario Street and East 69th Avenue, between 2010 and 2015. His employment ended after a heated argument.

Prior to that, McCabe said, Holt had been a frequent guest of the McIver family.

Just before the death, Holt had received an eviction notice from his landlord, McCabe told the court.

The Crown attorney said Holt left his Logan Street home on June 26, 2019 with an imitation Glock handgun and was caught on multiple cameras as he walked to McIver’s business.

He confronted McIver and demanded money for his years working with the company.

The discussion became heated, the court was heard; Holt picked up a window or door crank and hit McIver repeatedly in the back of the head.

“‘We had a fight and it got physical,'” McCabe said in Holt’s confession to police. “‘I lost control. I broke down. I hit him a lot.'”

McCabe said McIver continued to argue, which angered Holt.

The prosecutor said Holt then picked up a piece of machinery and struck McIver again in the back of the head. Holt then took a heavy-gauge rope and used it to strangle McIver as he lay on his back, McCabe said.

Holt took McIver’s cash and cards, which he tried to use at two banks. Later that day, he paid his landlady $600.

An autopsy revealed McIver had suffered multiple blunt head injuries and two fractured vertebrae along with other injuries.

Holt then wiped his hands with a rag he took with him. He threw his clothes, the fake gun and the rag into the Fraser River or a portable toilet, McCabe said.

The next day, Holt told his father what had happened and they began looking for a lawyer.

Holt was arrested on July 3, released, and re-arrested on July 23.

“The next day, Mr. Holt confessed to killing Mr. McIver,” McCabe told the judge.

McCabe said Holt’s only injury was a cut to a finger. However, this cut left blood at the scene. Police were able to identify it as belonging to Holt.

Ker has heard multiple victim impact statements from McIver’s family.

His son Derek McIver said the way Holt killed his father was “horrific”. He called his father a hero who always did his best for his family, friends and clients.

Sister Maureen said her former calm demeanor had been replaced by mistrust and anxiety following the death of her brother.

The case continues as lawyers make sentencing submissions.

Ker said she had hoped to serve her sentence on July 22, but decided to wait after reading the impact statements.

“You have to come up with thoughtful reasons, especially in a case like this,” Ker said.

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Metropolitan Antonios exclusively to TNH on the baptism of a gay couple’s children

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BOSTON – Metropolitan Antonios of Glyfada, Hellinikon, Voula, Vouliagmeni and Vari, whose jurisdiction includes the church of Panagia Faneromeni in which Archbishop Elpidophoros celebrated the baptism of the children of Greek-American gay couple Evangelos Bousis and Peter Dundas, on July 9, spoke in an exclusive interview with TNH about what happened. He openly states that Bishop Elpidophoros in fact misled him in order to obtain the canonical license to exercise his ministry within the limits of his Metropolis.

He said: “I feel distress for the following reason: Archbishop Elpidophoros sent me a letter and asked for permission to perform a baptism. It specifically said “the baptism of the children of the Greek-American Bousis family of Chicago”. As you can understand, I understood that it was a traditional family and therefore it was logical to give him my permission to celebrate the baptism. Later, however, it emerged that these children, who are innocent and have no involvement, are being raised by two people of the same sex. I believe that the baptism of such children has never been done in Greece, this is the first time it has been done. It should be kept very secret, and, of course, I don’t think His Eminence himself should do such a baptism without telling me. If I had known, I would have told him that Your Eminence, I cannot give such permission, I should report to the Holy Synod in writing, that the Holy Synod answer me in writing on what to do , and according to the orders I receive from my higher Authority, I will tell you what the decision will be.

Metropolitan Antonios also said, “I don’t think a bishop should do such a baptism so as not to feed someone who thinks everything is permitted in the Church.”

When asked if he felt misled, he replied: “Of course, because when he writes to me that it was a traditional family and in the end it is not a family in the form that our Church considers a family, isn’t that a misrepresentation? »

When asked if he intended to report Archbishop Elpidophoros directly to the Ecumenical Patriarchate, Metropolitan Antonios said, “I filed a complaint with the Holy Synod of the Church of Greece, at From then on, the Holy Synod as the competent authority will decide whether or not it should report it to the Ecumenical Patriarchate.

Bishop Elpidophoros with parents of newly baptized children Evangelos Bousis, Peter Dundas, family and friends. (Photo: INSTAGRAM/ EVBOUSIS)

When asked if since then he contacted Archbishop Elpidophoros to say “my Holy Brother, why did you do this?” he replied, “No, I didn’t call him, and he didn’t call me either. I was also informed that he was aware of the controversy that had started, he knew that they had started to curse him, he knew that he was wondering what attitude I had taken and I think that he should have communication with me.

On the question of the civil registry office and how neophyte children were registered in his metropolis with the name of the father and mother”, Metropolitan Antonios replied that “basically, from what we have seen , they were already registered with their names in the registry office in the United States, because the people who raise them live in the United States and have already registered them with their baptismal names which they have already received.

Asked if one day these children were looking for a baptismal certificate and turned to his metropolis, he said that “I think a certificate was given which says that the child was baptized such and such and given the name Eleni, no further details were given.”

Metropolitan Antonios also said, “That is why I have decided and am already preparing a plan and we will issue a baptism license, just as a marriage license is issued. Our Metropolis will issue a baptismal license after collecting all the necessary information and after the competent office that we will have in the Metropolis has decided if the baptism can take place, because I am afraid that I will have problems again.

Regarding what the people of the Metropolis are saying, he said that “they were very upset. Thank God we have very pious people who are close to the Tradition of our Church and they were disturbed, and I will not hide from you that I was also very disturbed, because he should have informed me in a basic way and saying, ‘Your Eminence, this is not a normal baptism, this is a special baptism’, that is what overwhelms me. He added that “it should have been done modestly, humbly, without any publicity and, of course, without the presence of a hierarch. A hierarch cannot say that I, by my presence, essentially validate this way of raising children.

About Metropolitan Antonios

His Eminence Metropolitan Antonios de Glyfada was born in Corfu. He studied at the Department of Law, Theology and Economics of the University of Athens. He is fluent in English and French, and quite good in German and Italian. In 2012 he was ordained Bishop of Salona under His Beatitude Archbishop of Athens and All Greece Ieronymos. He served as a preacher in the metropolis of Nikopolis and Preveza and as a chaplain at the children’s hospital “Aglaia Kyriakou” and at the parish of Skepis Papagou. He settled for four years on Mount Athos and served as an advisor to Hegumen at the Holy Monastery of Taxiarches – Petraki. He worked for a long time in the Department of Finance of the Holy Synod, of which he was the director general for eight years. During his tenure, he contributed to the recovery of the finances of the Church, the construction of several buildings and the renovation of the synodal court. He has written articles and scientific studies. He distinguished himself above all as a preacher and confessor. He was elected Metropolitan of Glyfada on March 20, 2019.

Statement by Malliotakis and Pappas on Erdogan’s meeting with Russia and Iranian presidents

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WASHINGTON, DC – On July 20, Representatives Nicole Malliotakis (NY-11) and Chris Pappas (NH-01) issued the following bipartisan statement condemning Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s meeting with Iranian President Ebrahim Raisi and Russian President Vladimir Putin in Tehran and reaffirming their opposition to the United States selling fighter jets and military equipment to Turkey:

“A picture is worth 1,000 words, and today’s meeting between Turkey’s Erdogan, Russia’s Putin and Iran’s Raisi should send a clear message to the Biden administration and Congress that Turkey cannot and will not must not be trusted. We urge our colleagues on both sides of the aisle to support our efforts to stop all sales of US military equipment to Turkey. Turkey may be a NATO ally, but under Erdogan, it pursues unprovoked aggression by threatening exclusive economic zones, ordering military overflights over the Greek islands and undermining NATO sanctions against Russia and US operations in Syria while continuing to violate US law by its possession of Russian-made S-400s that threaten NATO’s security infrastructure. After today, there should be no doubt that Turkey should be denied equipment and american military weapons cains.

Last week, Congress passed an amendment drafted by Pappas and co-sponsored by Malliotakis to deter the sale of US F-16 fighter jets and retrofit kits to Turkey following President Biden’s support for the deal.

Malliotakis, the daughter of a Greek immigrant, serves on the House Foreign Affairs Committee, where she serves on the subcommittee on international development, international organizations, and the social impact of global corporations, and serves on the Sub-Committee on Europe, Energy, Environment and Cyber. She is also a member of the Congressional Hellenic Caucus and the Congressional Hellenic-Israel Alliance.

Congressman Chris Pappas is a longtime resident of Manchester, New Hampshire, born into a proud Greek-American family. Pappas is a member of the House Veterans Affairs Committee, where he chairs the Oversight and Investigations Subcommittee, and the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee. He is also a member of the Congressional Hellenic Caucus and the Congressional Hellenic-Israel Alliance.

An island beach all to myself? Discover absolute bliss in Corfu

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Travel: An island beach all to myself? Discover absolute bliss in Corfu


































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Man admits guilt in Staten Island assault; the victim was sent to the hospital with a cerebral hemorrhage

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STATEN ISLAND, NY — A New Brighton man didn’t get the victim’s money in an attempted assault in Stapleton two years ago, but walked away with something else: jail time.

Arthur Williams, 35, of the 300 block of Jersey Street, faces up to four years behind bars after pleading guilty to attempted robbery, stemming from the June 1, 2020 episode.

A criminal complaint said the events took place around 10 p.m. on Trossach Road.

Williams and an accomplice accosted the victim and asked, “We need the money,” according to court documents from prosecutors.

The couple punched the victim in the face and began rummaging through his pockets, according to the complaint.

At one point, Williams placed part of his body on the victim’s neck and held it there for 10 seconds, according to court documents from prosecutors.

The victim was treated in hospital for a brain hemorrhage, lip laceration, bruising and facial flushing, according to court documents.

Williams’ alleged accomplice remains at large.

The accused was arrested approximately six weeks later, on July 13.

He was charged with assault, attempted robbery and attempted petty larceny.

Williams resolved the case Tuesday by pleading guilty in St. George State Supreme Court to attempted third-degree robbery.

In exchange, he will be sentenced on August 30 to two to four years in prison.

His lawyer did not immediately respond to an email seeking comment on the case.

Williams, meanwhile, has an ongoing misdemeanor case in which he is charged with aggravated driving without a license on Dec. 30, 2020, online state court records show.

The defendant is not the same Arthur Williams who was convicted on Monday of manslaughter in an unrelated case.

The cheapest beach holidays in Greece this summer – from £52 pp per night

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GREECE is one of Britain’s top holiday destinations, and there is still availability this summer.

We’ve found the best deals on self-catering and all-inclusive holidays in July and August, with prices from £52 pp a night.

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Greece is a favorite holiday destination for Britons and there is still availability for a holiday this summer, with prices from £52 per nightCredit: Getty

The average temperature for Greece and the Greek islands is around 30°C in July and August, which means that you can make the most of your days at the beach thanks to the sunny weather.

Holiday giants like Jet2 Holidays, easyJet Holidays and TUI are offering great deals on Greece getaways.

The biggest deal we’ve found is at Lovides Studio in Lourdas, Kefalonia, with week-long stays from £366 pp, departing Manchester on July 20.

The deal is £52 per person per night on a self catering basis.

Cheapest last minute beach holidays - from £52 per night in July and August
The cheapest beach holidays in the Mediterranean - from £23 pp a night in September

If you’re thinking of going in August, we’ve found seven nights at Village Oasis in Malia, Crete, from £419 pp (£59 pp), departing Manchester on August 2.

Here are the best deals we’ve found for self-catering holidays in July and August:

  • 7 nights at Fili Apartments in Tingaki, Kos, from Edinburgh – from £429 pp
  • 7 nights at Alexandra Hotel in Kamari, Santorini, from Bristol – from £478 pp
  • 7 Nights at Ziakis in Pefkos, Rhodes from Manchester – from £459 pp
  • 7 nights at Kamari Apartments in Acharavi, Corfu, from Manchester – from £459 pp
  • 7 Nights Morfeas Hotel in Kavos, Corfu from Manchester – from £469 pp
  • 7 Nights at Thomas Bay Hotel in San Stefanos, Corfu from – from £399 pp
  • 7 nights at Smaragdi II Studios in Golden Beach, Thassos, from London Gatwick – from £433 pp

For an all-inclusive holiday, the most affordable option we’ve found is in Crete, with seven nights at Koni Village Hotel Apartment from £599 pp, departing from Newcastle.

Most read in Beach Vacations

The deal is £85 per night on an all-inclusive basis.

Here are the best deals we’ve found for all-inclusive vacations in Greece this summer:

  • 7 Nights All Inclusive at San Giorgio Hotel in Skala, Kefalonia, departing 27th July from Doncaster-Sheffield – from £623 pp
  • 7 Nights All Inclusive at Panorama Hotel in Sidari, Corfu, departing 1st August from Newcastle – from £699 pp

Greece lifted all Covid-related entry restrictions last month, allowing all travelers to have unrestricted entry.

Vacationers no longer need a vaccination certificate or a negative test.

Face masks are no longer mandatory on planes, although face coverings must still be worn in Greece in hospitals and on urban public transport such as buses, metro and trams.

Prices are based on two adults traveling together and sharing accommodation.

Be sure to double check if luggage and transfers are included when comparing prices.

We’ve found deals for the ten best all-inclusive hotels with water parks in Greece on TripAdvisor, starting at £67 pp per night.

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I turned my dull caravan into a dream space using Ikea bargains and saved thousands

We’ve also rounded up the top 10 all-inclusive hotels with water parks in Turkey and Egypt on TripAdvisor.

For holidays in September, we have found the cheapest beach holidays in the Canary Islands from one night.

The average temperature for Greece and the Greek islands is around 30°C in July and August

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The average temperature for Greece and the Greek islands is around 30°C in July and AugustCredit: Getty

Surface Forces Archives – Page 507 of 507

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Iran threatens to exploit the Strait of Hormuz, oil markets react, global economies take notice, and more naval forces are sent to the region, raising the stakes for Tehran and the US Navy.

Late last year, the commander-in-chief of Iran’s navy, Admiral Habibollah Sayyari, warned that closing the strait would be “easier than drinking a glass of water”. The Obama administration has publicly dismissed the threat as “saber-braking,” but has also privately advised Tehran that attempting to close the strait would trigger a US military response.

“The laying of mines in international waters is an act of war,” Vice Admiral Mark Fox, commander of the US Navy’s Fifth Fleet, said in a Feb. 12 interview.
“We, under the direction of the national leadership, would prevent this from happening. We always have the right and the obligation of self-defense and that is self-defense. If we did nothing and allowed some mining, it would be a long and difficult process to clean them up.

Whether it is an act of war or not (international rules – certainly more honored in their violation than observation – authorize the exploitation in peacetime of the high seas under certain strict conditions), the Iranian officials have threatened to close the Strait of Hormuz in response to Western sanctions over its nuclear program.

US Navy photo of the USS Enterprise and USS Cape St. George passing through the Strait of Hormuz on May 11.

But the ultimate impact of such an escalation – if only in rhetoric – is unclear. According to a Jan. 23 report by the Congressional Research Service “…as in the past, the prospect of a major disruption to maritime traffic in the strait risks damaging Iranian interests. US and allied military capabilities in the region remain formidable. This makes an outright and prolonged closure of the strait unlikely. Nonetheless, such threats may heighten tensions in global energy markets and force the United States and other global oil consumers to consider the risks of another potential conflict in the Middle East.


A key transportation route for a daily flow of 17 million barrels of oil – around 35% of the world’s oil trade by sea – according to the US Energy Information Administration, the Strait of Hormuz is around 175 miles long nautical miles and narrows to 21 nautical miles. miles wide, making it an “international strait” under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. These international straits, which are completely surrounded by the 12-mile territorial waters of the coastal states, enjoy protective under the UNCLOS regime, even though the United States has not yet ratified the treaty.

Since the end of World War II, mines have severely damaged or sunk four times as many US Navy ships as all other means of attack combined. Fifteen of the 19 ships fell victim to mines. And that doesn’t include many more sunken or mine-damaged ships, from the Corfu Channel crisis of 1946 to the Persian Gulf tanker wars of the 1980s to the sinking of the MV’s Tamil Sea Tigers. Invincible In 2008.

During the Tanker War in the Persian Gulf, Iraq and Iran indiscriminately deployed several types of mines, including variants of the 1908 Russian-designed contact mine that nearly sank the USS frigate. Samuel B. Roberts (FFG-58) in April 1988. After the United States agreed to provide protection for the tanker convoys, the first convoy ran into trouble when the American-flagged supertanker MV Bridgeton struck a mine which gouged a large hole in her hull. Almost immediately, US Navy surface warships lined up astern Bridgeton, belying the adage that every ship can be a minesweeper once. If more mines were present, Bridgeton was to clear the way.

In 1990 and 1991, Iraq deployed more than 1,300 mines in the northern Gulf, including a weapon never before seen in the West. In the early morning of February 18, 1991, the USS Tripoli (LPH-10), carrying airborne mine countermeasures helicopters, struck an Iraqi contact mine; four hours later, the cruiser Aegis Princeton (CG-59) fell victim to a Manta mine, a “mission-kill” that took the cruiser out of the war and cost around $100 million to bring it back online. More at the point of the impact of a possible Iranian mining campaign in 2012, it took multinational Coalition forces more than two years of intensive mine countermeasures operations to declare the northern Gulf mine-free.

According to then-Chief of Naval Operations, Admiral Gary Roughead, in 2009 more than one million mines of 300 types were in the inventories of more than 65 navies. Russia had about 250,000 mines. The Chinese Navy is estimated to have around 100,000 mines, including a rising mine that could be deployed in waters deeper than 6,000 feet. And North Korea had about 50,000 mines. All three sell weapons to virtually any navy or terrorist group, anywhere, anytime, as do about 17 other countries.

Iran has acquired a stockpile of 3,000 to 6,000 mines, mostly of Soviet/Russian, Chinese or North Korean origin. Most are unsophisticated but still dangerous floating contact mines, such as those that damaged Robert and Tripoli. Other mines, like the Manta that hit Princeton, are bottom mines that come to rest on the bottom and wait for a target to satisfy various parameters. These influence mines are triggered when increasingly sophisticated target detection devices detect the magnetic, acoustic, seismic, water pressure, and electrical potential signatures of their victims.

An Iranian mine, the Chinese-made EM-52, is a multiple-influence (acoustic, magnetic, pressure) rocket-propelled mine armed with a 600-pound high-explosive warhead, which can be deployed by naval vessels. surface in waters as deep as 600 feet.

The inventory is also believed to include around 600 advanced multi-influence mines purchased from Russia, including MDM-3 which can be dropped from aircraft.

Mines can be emplaced by virtually any underwater, surface, and airborne platform. To effectively mine the entire Strait of Hormuz would require thousands of mines and several weeks or more. Iran could use Kilo-class submarines, which can carry 24 mines. But a larger operation should also involve small craft and possibly commercial vessels. A 2010 report by the Near East and Gulf Institute for Military Analysis shows these Iranian capabilities of the minelaying platform:

Physics will help delineate the problem. Generally, the water depth of the strait ranges from around 200 feet to 300 feet, but its northwest approaches are shallower, around 120 feet deep. In the strait itself, depths can reach 1,000 feet and currents make the deployment of bottom mines an uncertain tactic. If deployed in deep water, even large warhead bottom mines would have a limited effect on surface traffic.

Libya’s Red Sea mining in the summer of 1984, for example, used multi-influence bottom mines exported by East Germany, totally unknown to the West. Ships that detonated mines in deeper water suffered significantly less damage than those in shallower water. (A total of 23 ships reported being mine victims, although four were later assessed as insurance scams.)

Not that bottom mines wouldn’t be employed where it makes operational sense, but Iran would likely rely on bottom-moored contact mines that hide near the surface but remain difficult to detect and defeat. .

Mines are just one element of Iran’s anti-access/area denial weapons, which include speedboats armed with guns and missiles, small and mini submarines armed with torpedoes, anti-ship missiles based on land and planes.

In response to Iran’s mines rattle, the Navy is deploying four additional Avenger-class MCM ships to the region, for a total of eight Avengers, along with two more MH-53E airborne MCM helicopters added to the two already in theater. The additional units will be based in Bahrain, home to the navy’s Fifth Fleet. “I came to the conclusion that we could do better to prepare the theater,” said Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert to the Senate Armed Services Committee during a Navy budget hearing earlier this year. “I wanted to be sure…that we are ready, that our people are competent, that they are confident and that they are good at what they do when needed.”

The Navy also announced that the USS Mackerel (LPD-15) is being refitted to support naval forces in the region, primarily focused on the MCM mission. A provisional Advanced Intermediate Afloat Base (AFSB), its “main battery” will consist of AMCM helicopters and support craft. This too has been done before, with the mid-1990s conversion of USS Inchon (LPH/MCS-12) as the MCM command and control vessel.

In addition, the naval MCM “order of battle” includes several Royal Navy MCM ships and Royal Australian Navy assets, as well as MCM capabilities from regional US maritime partners.

“It’s a volume issue more than a technical challenge,” Navy Lt. Cmdr. Wayne Liebold, captain of the USS Gladiator (MCM-11), one of the Avenger MCM ships based in Bahrain, said The Huffington Post. “My concern is going out there and having to search for a large volume of water with large amounts of mines,” said Liebold, who has completed three MCM deployments to the gulf.

Although easily detectable, the laying of several hundred mines in a few days could have a significant, albeit temporary, effect on commercial and naval mobility. More generally, however, the impact on global oil markets is unclear. During the Red Sea and Gulf of Suez mining crisis of 1984, commercial and naval traffic continued unabated, despite reports of underwater explosions, and world oil prices were virtually unaffected. affected.

“Conventional wisdom might suggest that the outbreak of hostilities in the Strait of Hormuz or the Persian Gulf would significantly halt or discourage the flow of maritime traffic through the strait,” said Cmdr. Rodney A. Mills wrote in a 2008 Naval War College study, “But the ‘tanker wars’ between Iran and Iraq in the 1980s show a different behavior of the shipping industry. During the eight years of conflict, 544 attacks were carried out against all ships in the Gulf, leaving more than 400 civilians killed and 400 others injured. However, after an initial drop of 25%, the shipping industry adjusted to the risk and trade flow picked up. Despite the threat, oil and other maritime commerce continued to flow even as the conflict escalated until 1987, when a total of 179 attacks were carried out, roughly one attack every two days.

In short, while Iranian mines may not be obstacles, they certainly can be speed bumps that attack strategies, plans, and timelines, in addition to ships and submarines.

Flights suspended at Luton as high temperatures cause runway fault

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Flights were suspended at Luton Airport due to a runway fault caused by high temperatures on Monday.

A statement posted to the airport’s Twitter account shortly after 4:20 p.m. read: “As a result of today’s high temperatures, a surface defect has been identified on the runway.

“Engineers were immediately called to the site and repair work is currently underway to resume operations as soon as possible.

“We would like to apologize for the inconvenience caused.”

At least 14 inbound passenger flights have so far been diverted – mostly to the nearby town of Stansted. They include Ryanair flights from Athens, Zante and Las Palmas, easyJet from Catania and Tui from Skiathos.

Gatwick was the diversion destination for an easyJet flight from Marrakech and Wizz Air arrivals from Budapest and Tirana.

The disruption is likely to impact operations until the end of the day, with cancellations almost inevitable.

An update from the airport at 5:30 p.m. confirmed that services were still suspended “to allow essential repair to the runway after high surface temperatures caused a small section to heave”.

She reiterated that she hoped “to resume operations shortly”.

Meanwhile, passenger Alison Cybe tweeted a video of hundreds of furious passengers crammed into the Luton departure lounge while dozens of flights were prevented from taking off.

It comes as the UK experiences an unprecedented heat wave in July, with temperatures between 35 and 43 degrees Celsius forecast for parts of the country on Monday and Tuesday.

Temperatures in Luton are currently 36 degrees after peaking at 37, with 40 degrees forecast for Tuesday.

Departures scheduled from 3.50pm were given a later scheduled departure time on the Luton Airport website, with many delaying departure by two hours.

The 3.50pm easyJet flight to Heraklion, Crete is now scheduled for 5.00pm at the earliest and the 3.55pm Tui flight to Corfu is now scheduled for 5.55pm at the earliest.

Holiday flights to Tenerife, Bodrum, Dubrovnik and Alicante are expected to be affected, as are airlines such as easyJet, Tui, Ryanair and Wizz Air.

The UK’s largest RAF flying base, Brize Norton, has also suspended flight operations with reports that its ‘runway has melted’.

If air passengers’ flights are delayed by two hours or more, they may be entitled to compensation – although airlines can invoke “extraordinary circumstances” beyond their control and avoid payment.

Resilience and Tourism | The Manila Times

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THE economic drivers, before the pandemic, were OFW remittances and the BPO industry. We remained buoyant during the crucial pandemic years, again driven by OFW remittances which recorded a record high through banking channels of $31.4 billion in 2021. Cash remittances increased by 5.1% from $29.9 billion in 2020, according to Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas. If we add personal cash transfers and the value of non-cash items brought or sent by Filipinos abroad, the total amount of personal remittances reached $34.9 billion, a record high and an increase of 5 .1% from $33.2 billion in 2020.

Personal remittances from OFWs accounted for 9.8% of the country’s GDP in 2021. The increase occurred despite nearly one million OFWs being repatriated (all free of charge) due to the pandemic. The BPO industry, on the other hand, contributes more than 11% of the GDP. It is the largest sector and employs over 1.2 million people in 1,000 outsourcing companies. This sector contributes $30 billion to the economy every year. The Philippines is estimated to hold 10-15% of the global BPO market and could potentially grow by 8-10% every year as labor patterns change due to the pandemic. This has led to the growth of the “gig economy”, opening up to more workers working from home.

The country’s tourism industry can only be the main driver of our restart if we have to look at it in terms of sustainability, balancing carrying capacity, i.e. income and resilience. The Philippine travel and tourism sector took a significant leap in 2021 when it recorded a $41 billion contribution to our economy based on the latest Economic Impact Report or EIR from the World Travel and Tourism Council (WTTC). This sector contributed an average of 22.5% of the total economy, or approximately $29.6 billion. The lockdowns led to a drop in revenue of almost 81%, so in 2020 the country earned only 17.8 billion pesos. As restrictions were eased in 2021, the figure rose to $41 billion, representing a 10.4% share in our total economy.

And this is where tourism can be linked to employment due to its multiplier effect both nationally and locally, leading to the recovery of an additional 1.3 million jobs, which can even reach 7.8 million. jobs, according to the WTTC. If the trend continues, tourism’s contribution to GDP could exceed $155 billion in 2032, accounting for 21.5% of all employment in the Philippines. But we can’t just be part of the herd. The country must be in the lead in terms of visitor numbers because we have 7,641 reasons to be.

Of the 7,641 islands, only 2,000 are inhabited. More than 5,000 islands in the archipelago do not yet have names. The 50 largest islands have a combined area of ​​300,000 square kilometers and a combined population of 108.9 million, which means that these 50 largest islands contain 99% of our population. Passage of the long-delayed Land Use Bill is urgently needed so that we can define land boundaries for ecotourism. Imagine if each of the 81 provinces has a designated area, the best area for ecotourism.

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In 2020, due to the pandemic, the Philippines had only 1,482,535 visitor arrivals while Thailand had 6,702,396. Malaysia had 4,332,722 while Indonesia had 4,052,923 and Vietnam 3,686,779.

In 2019, the Philippines had 8,260,913 visitors while Thailand had 38,178,194; Malaysia at 26,100,874; Vietnam at 18,008,591 and Indonesia at 16,106,954. Why aren’t we a chosen destination among ASEAN countries?

The Philippines has the 7th largest number of islands in the world after Sweden, Finland, Norway, Canada, Indonesia and Australia. Luzon and Mindanao are contiguous, but Visayas is made up of several separate islands and islets. Peace and order are vital as well as transportation to connect the various islands by air, sea and land. There are 30 island provinces that can be destination magnets.

Imagine having a tourism ranking like the Michelin star that can signal that our country is ready, not only for luxury destinations, but also for ecotourism that showcases the culture of each province. And we should learn from Siargao, a global destination because of surfing. Siargao has taught us to pursue sustainable (carrying capacity), inclusive and resilient tourism. Boracay showed us why carrying capacity needs to be strengthened in the development process as well as in tourism. Boracay has given us a second chance at stewardship and that is why roadblocks need to be heeded. Farm-to-table is sustainable tourism, but it’s not sexy for those who only see high-end destinations.

Tourism is not just about marketing, advertising and all that glamour. It solves the obstacles that matter. These obstacles have been identified quite often: “1) the development and management of tourist destinations is seen in a piecemeal rather than holistic approach; 2) infrastructure remains inadequate to support tourism development and sustainability; 3) tourist destinations are affected and need to recover from various disasters and pandemics; and 4) responsibility for managing growth and promoting sustainable tourism between national and local government is unclear. »

Imagine developing the biodiversity quadrilateral of a destination in Oslob, Dumaguete, Siquijor and Bohol? Or the DuSiBo Triangle? Between these islands are rich centers of biodiversity, which need to be protected and nurtured. The load capacity must be the most important index. We close once we have exceeded capacity; therefore, other destinations may be considered. Imagine having a destination calendar that takes the resiliency factor into account in the planning. Imagine if every province can do this and we have 81 calendar destinations based on the unique activities in each region. But what unites all of this? Culture (food and clothing) and heritage (spiritual). Tourism is the biggest industry in the world, and we are sitting on a pile of gold by not exploiting our potentials.

The cops take the guns off the street; robbery at gunpoint: Crime stories of the week

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STATEN ISLAND, NY – Here’s a look at some major criminal justice headlines this week in Staten Island:

Staten Island police confiscated at least seven firearms in nine days in July. (Twitter)

COPS REMOVE 7 GUNS IN 9 DAYS, NYPD COMMISSIONER SAYS

At an NYPD press conference on Wednesday, Police Commissioner Keechant Sewell noted 65 firearms seized and 57 firearms arrests made during multiple shootings over the July 4 weekend.

Staten Island officers contributed to the numbers, which in the past nine days have seized at least seven firearms from multiple police stations, according to NYPD officials.

Click here for the full story.

2 GUNS RECOVERED FROM TWO TEENS SAID COPS

The NYPD reportedly seized two firearms from 17-year-old boys in Stapleton.

The teens were arrested around 6:15 p.m. Monday at the corner of Gordon and Broad streets, according to a spokeswoman for the NYPD’s deputy public information commissioner.

After the recovery of two firearms, the two suspects were charged with criminal possession of a firearm, the police spokeswoman said.

Click here for the full story.

MAN INVOLVED IN FATAL ACCIDENT CHARGED WITH SUSPENDED LICENSE

A 47-year-old New Jersey man has been charged with driving with a suspended license in the horrific collision that killed three teenagers in Pleasant Plains.

The victims were all driving in a Ford Mustang traveling at a “dangerous speed” when it collided with a 2017 GMC Yukon driven by Maher Asi-Mahmoud on Hylan Boulevard and Richard Avenue just before 8:50 p.m. Sunday. according to the police.

Click here for the full story.

NYPD seeks man in connection with sexual abuse of 11-year-old girl

The NYPD provided a photo of 40-year-old Juan Mendieta. (Photo courtesy of DCPI)

NYPD IS SEARCHING FOR MAN IN CONNECTION WITH ALLEGED ABUSE OF 11-YEAR-OLD GIRL

The NYPD is asking for the public’s help in locating a 40-year-old man for questioning in connection with multiple counts of sexual abuse against an 11-year-old girl.

The department identified the wanted man as Juan Mendieta in a written statement from the NYPD Deputy Commissioner of Public Information. The relationship between Mendieta and the alleged victim is unclear.

Click here for the full story.

TIPS NEEDED TO LOCATE MAN FOR INTERROGATION FOR ALLEGED ASSAULT OF 8-YEAR-OLD BOY

The Staten Island Special Victims Squad is asking for the public’s help in locating a man wanted for questioning in connection with the alleged assault of a child in our borough on July 4.

The incident allegedly happened at 8:15 p.m., according to a Twitter post from the NYPD’s Special Victims Division.

The victim was an 8-year-old boy and the alleged incident took place in the vicinity of Broadway in West Brighton, an NYPD Deputy Commissioner for Public Information official told Advance/SILive.com.

Click here for the full story.

Attempted theft

The alleged incident happened near Ann Street and Port Richmond Avenue.

THEFT AT GUNPOINT IN PORT RICHMOND, SAYS COPS; INCREASE IN FLIGHTS TO STATEN ISLAND

A man was allegedly robbed and injured at gunpoint by three suspects early Friday morning in Port Richmond at a time when burglaries rose more than 20% on Staten Island, police say.

The latest incident happened around 4:30 a.m. near Port Richmond Avenue and Ann Street, according to an NYPD spokesperson.

The three suspects approached the victim and one of the perpetrators brandished a firearm. The culprits forcibly took about $400 in cash before fleeing on foot in an unknown direction, the police spokesman said.

Click here for the full story.

“On a perfect summer night, it’s a priceless place of memory”

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A bit like you I am quite weird. You see, I also enjoy certain smells that as an organic human I should hate. The same way my mother loves the smell of garbage trucks, bringing back fond childhood memories, I savor the smell of exhaust coming from the back of a small boat.

I smell a puff of black smoke coming from the engine, mixed with the smell of sea salt, and suddenly I am transported to a place of calm serenity, vacation and happiness. It could be Paxos, Corfu or Leros and when the pong is joined by the swirling, gurgling sound of the engine as it gently spins, I’m almost giddy with contentment.

But before you go for a good dose of nostalgia with a little puff of diesel, a dirty ashtray or a jar of chlorine, come with me on this little boat as we sail away from Exmouth Marina for a restaurant built on a barge tied in the middle of the Exe estuary.

If you already have a boat, you won’t need to spend £7 on the Puffin water taxi, just be careful of the big sandbar in the way, or you’ll still be stranded while we get stuck in a plate of oysters.

We were blessed with a calm warm cloudless evening which made the experience all the more lovely as the sun was setting and the lights of the surrounding anchored boats twinkled.

The River Exe Cafe opened in 2011, consisting of two houseboats and a shed, and I’m not at all sorry for being a little late to the party. On a perfect summer night it’s an invaluable place to remember, although I suspect it would also be great fun on a rainy day. It only opens from April to September, so get started now.

The menu is made up of locally sourced produce, and the decor — wood decking on the floors and walls, sturdy wood and plank tables, blue chairs, and garlands of international brands — screams “SEAFRUIT!”

We sipped a deliciously chilled and dry bottle of Muscadet Fildefere, which comes with a Grolsch-style flip-top bottle seal (pretty, charming and reusable), as they carried a pint of prawns to the table with some good bread sourdough and olive oil and a plate of their homemade crispy chips.

With a table at 8:30pm we were the last of several services and our server duly presented us with the items they were running out of. No lobster, for example. Horror shock. But I forgave them. Stuck on a raft built on two rusty old barges from Stoke-on-Trent, the demands of kitchen economy and location mean they run a cramped barge.

The prawns had bounce and bite, enhanced by a nice saffron aioli. We also had a plate of Teignmouth oysters, tight barge syndrome meaning we had 11 instead of 12. Is this an omen? All old wives’ tales are welcome… (FYI, I’m still alive as I write and a piano hasn’t fallen on my head.)

A sashimi platter to share was a mixed bag, with wonderful tuna, its edges rolled in sesame, but less fresh and chewy salmon (salted with citrus) and marinated mackerel. The issue perhaps being more my grouse at the word ‘sashimi’, which actually means raw, not raw, some cured, and whatever the head of the ship feels.

But our main course mussels were sensational, like a benevolent sultan: rich and fat and glorious. We rode away, under starry skies across the still waters, my head, heart and stomach full of food, memory and marine diesel fuel.



Inside the world of Princess Olympia of Greece

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Princess Olympia of Greece was just 10 years old when she first carried a designer handbag. Her grandmother loaned her a mini Louis Vuitton style to wear to a family dinner, and that’s how her love of luxury fashion and accessories began. “I was fancy for that meal,” she laughs. “I was only 10, but I felt so empowered. My grandma still owns this bag, and it still looks fabulous. I’m a real bag lady now, I have a problem. How much do I? I have absolutely no idea.”

She may come from royalty, but Olympia has none of the stiff upper lip and reserve typically associated with those of similar status. During our conversation, she laughs easily and speaks with warmth and energy. Her father, Pavlos, Crown Prince of Greece, describes her as his “firecracker girl” and she also enjoys a close relationship with her mother, luxury children’s clothing designer Marie-Chantal Miller, whom she FaceTimes daily. As the older sister of four younger brothers, she is both daddy’s and mommy’s girl. “There was a time when mom said, ‘Maybe I’ll have a sixth child’ and honestly, thinking about it…I said, ‘You don’t have the right’ because I just knew that it would be a girl,” she laughs. “I love having boys around. I think it makes you a bit harder too.

Being in the spotlight definitely changes things, but it shouldn’t

Olympia was born in the home of the Greek royal family in Corfu, but spent most of her life in London where the family emigrated after her grandfather, King Constantine II, lost the crown in the abolition of the Greek monarchy in 1973. Through her father’s side, she is related to almost all European royal families – her godfather, for example, is Prince Charles, whom she credits with always remembering her birthday. Now almost 25, she lives in Notting Hill with her dog, Eccho – a lockdown investment that has worked well. “I am constantly with her,” she says. “She is like my child. I’m happy to have a dog because it means I have to take care of someone and be an adult. Her Instagram is a whirlwind of fashion soirees, photogenic dinner parties and sunny vacations, but she’s a princess who loves staying home watching a TV series as much as she does high-octane glamour. “I love watching TV,” she says guiltily. “I cried my eyes out at the end of stranger things. This show is fantastic. There are times when I have to stop myself from watching TV because I can watch anything. It’s bad, sometimes I walk around my house holding my iPad so I can keep watching something.

Courtesy of Louis Vuitton

Much has been said about the pressure and scrutiny placed on members of the royal family, especially women, but Olympia and her family are in the enviable position of holding the title without having any of the duties and attributes that accompany him. Who needs a kingdom when you have freedom, or a crown when you’re allowed to wear a miniskirt and heels? She says the only behavior her family forced on her was the importance of good manners, a virtue her mother wrote a book about, Good manners start at breakfast: modern etiquette for families.

Elegance is more than what you wear


“If you’re in the limelight, people will always watch how you behave and dress, but my parents would have taught me the same things if I wasn’t from my family: table manners , always getting up when someone walks by, little things like that,” she told me. “They did it in a fun way; I never thought they told us how to behave. She pauses before adding, “Being in the limelight definitely changes things, but it shouldn’t. I think we should all act like there’s someone watching. [If you’re royal] you have to go the extra mile, even with Instagram and what I post, but I think in terms of behavior my parents raised us in a way that “this is the way to behave” in polite terms. From a very young age, we joined our parents at dinner parties and I loved it. I loved spending time with old people and learning things.

philippos of greece wedding in athens
Olympia with her four brothers, Constantine-Alexios, Achileas-Andreas, Odysseas-Kimon, Aristidis-Stavros, and her parents Crown Prince Pavlos and Crown Princess Marie-Chantal, at the wedding of Nina Flohr and Prince Philippos in Athens in October 2021

Milos BicanskiGetty Images

One of the benefits of her journey is access to her mother’s elegant and luxurious wardrobe. The two share clothes, and Olympia’s most prized possessions are coins passed down to her, as well as items that might have accidentally moved from her mother’s closet to hers, including a pair of cowboy boots. . “The things that matter most are the pieces my grandmother wore when she was, say, 40, or the pieces my mom gave me and wore before she had me,” she says. . “Now I wear these pieces to events and it reminds me of my mother. They have a story and a story. My favorite was an old black custom Valentino dress [pictured below] from my mother that she first wore when she was 20 and then I wore when I was 18 or 19. It was really special.

Greek Olympia
Olympia with her mother Marie-Chantal Miller at a Valentino event in 2012

Nick HarveyGetty Images

Olympia’s love for fashion goes beyond the superficial. At 17, she completed an internship at Christian Dior Couture with Raf Simons, then studied fashion, commerce and marketing at NYU. She is currently the face of Louis Vuitton’s Capucine bag campaign, a perfect choice for the little girl who carried her 10-year-old grandmother’s Vuitton bag.

“Vuitton are amazing at making their items iconic and enduring; I’d love to know how they did it,” she says. “There’s something empowering and amazing about the brand. They know how to capture people’s attention. everybody.

If you buy well, this piece will last forever

To celebrate the launch of the new campaign, Olympia hosted an intimate dinner this week at the private apartment above the brand’s New Bond Street store, with stylish guests including Camille Charrière and Sabine Getty – all of whom wore a Capucines bag in different sizes and shades. “Every person at my dinner looked so different but looked so beautiful,” she says. “People kept coming in and I was like, ‘wow’.”

She pauses and adds, “You are what you wear. If you buy well, this piece will last forever and everyone will wear it differently.

best dressed celebrities

James D. Kelly for Louis Vuitton

greece olympia dinner louis vuitton

James D. Kelly for Louis Vuitton

greece olympia dinner louis vuitton

James D. Kelly for Louis Vuitton

Olympia also dreams of starting her own fashion business. “I would love to have something of my own one day, but I don’t know what it would be because there’s so much out there right now,” she says. “I had so much fun collaborating and learning from other brands about what it takes and discovering all the behind it. It’s hard to have your own business, so I’m happy to learn.

One thing she understood was elegance – what it looks like and what it stands for. I ask her what this word means to her as a modern princess. “Whenever I see someone looking stylish I think wow, but it’s when you talk to them and they’re so adorable that it gets better,” she says. “Elegance is more than what you wear. It’s how you are as a person and how you treat others. It may be corny, but that’s how I feel.

princess olympia of greece interview for louis vuitton

Courtesy of Louis Vuitton

Former French President Nicolas Sarkozy keeps in top form during his visit to Athens

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A summer lover in Greece is the former President of France, Nicolas Sarkozy, who in recent years has chosen our country for rest and a change in performance.

He is of course currently accompanied by his wife, Carla Bruni, in the Greek capital.

Sarkozy arrived in Greece on Wednesday and chose to stay with his wife and their only daughter, Julia, at the Grande Bretagne hotel.

Holidays do not mean inactivity for the former president of France, however, as Proto Thema’s camera captured him running in central Athens on Thursday.

Sarkozy left the hotel at 8:30 a.m. and walked and ran for almost an hour and a half, doing the Zappeion circuit and returning around 10:00 a.m. to Great Britain.

As you can see from the screenshots, a lot of the exercise must have happened after he came back… drenched in sweat.

See photos :

vNicolas Sarkozy in Athens on July 14, 2022.

Nicolas Sarkozy in Athens on July 14, 2022.

He left shortly before noon

Meanwhile, shortly before noon, Sarkozy and his wife left the hotel.

See photos :

Nicolas Sarkozy in Athens on July 14, 2022.

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Nicolas Sarkozy in Athens on July 14, 2022.

Nicolas Sarkozy in Athens on July 14, 2022.

Nicolas Sarkozy in Athens on July 14, 2022.

Nicolas Sarkozy in Athens on July 14, 2022.

Nicolas Sarkozy in Athens on July 14, 2022.

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Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis met the former French President at Maximos Palace.

The former French president, who is on vacation in Greece, has asked to meet the prime minister, with the meeting taking place on Wednesday afternoon.

Barely a year earlier, the Sarkozy couple had said goodbye to Greece by posting photos of the impressive view from their bedroom, blue beaches and Greek cuisine.

Although at the time they avoided revealing their destination, they had accompanied the photo album of their vacation with the Aristotelian term “bliss”, next to the icon of the Greek flag.

It turned out that their public ode to Greece was not a final farewell, but a welcome return.

Indeed, the privileged relationship they have with the country has been confirmed by the fact that they have not only returned, but this time they have chosen Greece as the first stage of their family vacation, before visiting Cap Nègre, Carla Bruni’s country house.

At the iconic Hotel Grande Bretagne, they were welcomed by General Manager Hom Parviz. The family of three should take advantage of the summer in the Greek capital to visit the Acropolis, while it is possible that one of the Greek islands will complete its rich program.

It’s a precious breath of rest and recuperation, given that Sarkozy is in the midst of his country’s chaotic central political scene.

After French President Emmanuel Macron lost his majority in the French National Assembly, Sarkozy, who has close ties to the Republican Party, worked hard for a possible partnership.

He is one of those who know French anthropogeography as little as possible and is therefore a key person for possible future collaboration. Many, after all, have looked to Sarkozy, calling him the one who will bridge the gap and contribute to France’s stability.

In her interview with a women’s magazine a few days ago, Carla Bruni avoided mentioning any of the above. However, wearing a black one-piece swimsuit and proving that 54 is just a number, she admitted she was counting down the days until her family holiday. After all, these leave from Greece.

Nicolas Sarkozy in Athens on July 14, 2022.

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READ MORE: Tsipras’ partner, Betty Baziana, wears an ancient Greek-style dress to attend a performance at the Epidaurus Theater.

Investors continue to benefit from the resilience of the Sri Lankan garment sector – The Island

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API Sathosa Motors

Positioned at the forefront of the commercial vehicle industry segment, Sathosa Motors (SML) PLC celebrates its glorious 60th anniversary in 2022, coinciding with its 60th year of partnership with Isuzu Japan since 1962, the Japanese truck brand most reliable and the market leader in the Japanese Commercial Truck Segment in Sri Lanka. SML can be credited with the rise in popularity of Japanese vehicles in Sri Lanka, making Isuzu the most sought after vehicle by fleet owners, government sector etc. SML is now rated by Isuzu Motors Japan, a distinguished quality standard provided for installation, customer experience, technical expertise and use of standard equipment, and among the top 16 Isuzu dealerships worldwide. Sathosa Motors PLC (SML) is also the franchise holder for Isuzu vehicles, Isuzu marine engines and Isuzu genuine spare parts manufactured by MM. Isuzu Motors Limited.

proud history

Imports and sales of Isuzu vehicles and spare parts were handled by CWE’s New Vehicles and Machinery Department until 1985. The Department of Trade and Commerce under which CWE operated, decided to convert the New Vehicles and Machinery Department into a wholly-owned subsidiary. of the cooperative wholesale establishment titled “Sathosa Motors Limited” on January 1, 1985 to provide more freedom to conduct business operations efficiently, in the face of competition from other car dealerships. Access Engineering PLC (AEL), a leading trading company in Sri Lanka, acquired the stake held in Sathosa Motors PLC by ITOCHU Corporation of Japan in February 2012. Subsequently, through the tender offer of mandatory shares, Access Engineering increased its stake to 84.42%. In its most recent pioneering achievement, SML introduced EURO IV emission standard commercial trucks in 2018, the first brand new EURO IV vehicles to enter the market. SML began selling Isuzu marine engines in 2021, continuing its heritage of highly reliable diesel engines in the marine industry.

Christopher Joshua, Managing Director of SML, said, “We are delighted to celebrate SML’s 60th anniversary this year and to be recognized as the market leader in the automotive industry’s Japanese commercial truck category. In this landmark year, we also celebrate 60 years of our partnership with Isuzu, a world renowned vehicle brand. We are grateful to Isuzu for maintaining its faith, trust and support in SML for over six decades and for awarding a coveted star rating to SML as one of its top 16 dealerships in the world, which is a real honor for SML and reflects its professionalism and confidence. service. Building on its loyal customer base and its ability to adapt to the new normal, SML is developing a new identity in after-sales services to strengthen its leadership position.

State-of-the-art aftermarket facilities

Six decades later, SML has created a value proposition for its loyal customer base by providing unparalleled after-sales service. The main businesses of the company are the sale of new vehicles, spare parts, marine engines; and workshop service. SML meets the country’s need for reliable, low-maintenance transportation solutions, especially for the business community.

One of the main reasons SML has carved out a leading status in the commercial vehicle segment is its renowned, proven, reliable, durable and efficient Isuzu diesel engines. In addition, SML has the commercial engine and repair expertise that provides exceptional aftermarket service to Isuzu customers. The company has built up a long-standing customer base, many of which only use Isuzu in vehicle fleets, we can call it a prestigious customer base, which represents all sectors of our economy.

SML has state-of-the-art aftermarket facilities at Vauxhall Street Colombo, Peliyagoda and Kurunegala. SML has made substantial investments in developing the workshop facilities, modernizing them with world-class equipment such as hydraulic lifts up to 30T, imported precision tools and other major facility upgrades . SML’s investments in workshop facilities have reaped rewards during the pandemic, allowing the company to show a reasonable performance. Although the sector got off to a slow start due to the COVID-19 lockdown, steady volume growth in the workshops was observed and the year saw the highest turnover ever.

Peliyagoda’s head office and workshop facilities were upgraded and upgraded, increasing the capacity of the workshop. In total, the Group has quadrupled the capacity of its workshops compared to its previous capacity, addressing a wider customer base in more regions. In its service and repair solutions, the workshops provide services that include the supply and repair of all minor and major vehicle spare parts as well as lubricant support. SML workshops rely on a range of state-of-the-art equipment installed for collision repair and analysis. The machines are operated by qualified and versatile technicians trained locally and abroad, according to the manufacturers’ strict operating standards.

SML is re-evaluating traditional methods of customer service to identify innovative ways to reach and serve customers more conveniently, safely and efficiently. In addition, the company is carefully evaluating its internal processes, systems and IT infrastructure to streamline and increase supply chain efficiency.

Marine engines

The company has made rapid inroads into the marine engine segment, having sold up to 20 engines within a year of launching this product line. The marine engine brand is well accepted by the fishing industry and boat owners. The all-new Japanese-made marine engines supplied by SML are popular around the world and offer better fuel efficiency and reliable performance over a long period of time. Backed by dedicated island-wide after-sales support, with trained and certified Isuzu technicians and a supply of spare parts, the company is building a steady influx of loyal customers who have provided excellent engine performance feedback. SML sailors.

Strategic expansion plan

Further strengthening its position, SML is expanding its position as a trusted leader in the automotive industry, investing heavily in workshops and establishing new branches at strategic locations in selected cities. In 2021, a new branch was opened in Negombo, focusing on inboard marine engines and spare parts sales. SML aims to expand the workshop and spare parts facilities in the coming year, providing new and existing customers with direct access to obtain after-sales services from regional branches. In addition, if necessary, the Company wishes to appoint dealers in remote areas to support customers. The Company now has 10 sites providing after-sales service, of which 03 spare parts branches were opened in Dambulla, Kandy & Badulla in 2021.

Further commenting, Priyantha Perera, Executive Director of SML said, “Despite 60 years in the industry, SML remains nimble and has evolved from a sales-focused to a service-focused business by driving expanding network and services to provide superior after-sales service. . Our workshops have state-of-the-art facilities that are the benchmark in the industry and the only facility dedicated to commercial vehicles that sets our offer apart. A significant investment has been made to improve the workshop infrastructure, including vehicle painting services in a pleasant atmosphere. SML single-handedly developed the Japanese truck segment, capturing a 60% market share. More importantly, our workshops offer services to all vehicle brands although the core business remains Isuzu vehicles. Our teams are professionally trained at home and abroad while continuous training is provided to ensure they remain at the forefront of vehicle servicing, repair and servicing.

Why reliable after-sales service is important

The reason people choose reputable vehicle brands is to ensure that they have access to proper maintenance and care of their vehicle from a qualified aftermarket provider. These factors contribute in a major way to the longevity of the vehicle, the safety and the optimization as well as the reduction of the repair costs in time of the fact that the vehicle is maintained in the best way by the after-sales service provider. . SML has built strong relationships based on trust and reliability with its customers over the years.

The company plans to grow the aftermarket and aftermarket segment of the business and introduce new business ventures beyond its traditional and convenience product lines. As a trusted partner to a large customer base across the island, SML provides sound advice, including the need to keep vehicles in good working order by having them checked regularly, as the ban on importing vehicles could not be lifted in the foreseeable future.

Vehicles should be regularly checked, maintained and any premature irregularities immediately rectified without further damage to the vehicle. The use of genuine spare parts is important to keep the vehicle in good condition, while good maintenance and proper care improve the performance as well as the longevity of the vehicle. In order to keep the vehicle in perfect condition, you need a reliable service partner. SML is fully equipped to provide this service – offering a free health check for Isuzu vehicles using specialist tools imported from Japan that diagnose the vehicle’s current condition and performance and recommend repair and maintenance advice. proper maintenance. As most Isuzu vehicles are used for essential service distribution, we at SML stand ready to provide exceptional and uninterrupted service during this difficult time to maintain 100% availability of Isuzu vehicles to serve the entire country. .

Cruise in Greece and Montenegro

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By Ashley Maer

Exploring the beautiful island of Mykonos on a motorbike was not what we expected on a cruise.

But it was the unexpected highlight after booking a seven-night stay on Royal Caribbean’s Brilliance of the Seas.

We boarded the ship in the Italian port of Ravenna in early June after flying from Malaga to Bologna with Ryanair.

My girlfriend had never been on a cruise before, so I was curious to see if a vacation to Kotor, Corfu, Athens, Mykonos and Kefalonia would float her boat, so to speak.

Kotor

Our first morning on board saw us sipping tea on our balcony as the ship glided silently through the Bay of Kotor, which we both agreed with synchronized nods was an impressive start to the holiday.

It’s a small destination, so we took a tender for the old walled town, which was originally founded by the Romans. We wandered the narrow streets and got lost, before finding a bar to enjoy a cold beer and escape the 32°C heat.

We saw many well-groomed cats lounging around the town, as the locals consider them lucky. And with some silly cat-themed gifts, we were back on board.

Corfu

We caught a hop-on hop-off tourist bus (one of the ones you see everywhere in European cities) upon arrival at the port (19 euros each). From there we visited the Old Fortress of Corfu, which is touted as one of the most impressive fortifications in Europe. Costing six euros to enter, it will take you at least an hour and a half to do a good snooping and walk to the top to soak up views of the UNESCO-listed old town.

Athens

This was the stop I was looking forward to the most, as I wanted to visit the famous Acropolis, a rocky outcrop above the city center and another UNESCO World Heritage Site. We took another tourist bus (20 euros each) which dropped us off at the site and after being relieved of an additional 20 euros each we were allowed to wander around the old buildings opposite the Parthenon. It was busy and hot – and from there you can appreciate just how huge the city is. After too many photos, there was only time to stop at the downtown flea market before getting back on the boat. An interesting town, but it was too much to see in a few hours.

Mykonos

Hands down, this was our favorite stop. Its iconic windmills, beautiful old town and whitewashed houses were breathtaking. We rented a 125cc motorbike for the modest sum of 25 euros and spent a few hours exploring the island, before returning to a seaside postcard location called Little Venice, where you can have lunch with the sea splashes at your feet. We took an obscene amount of photos and even ran into another Gibraltarian on the island!

Kefalonia

Courageous after having rented a motorcycle the day before, we rented another (35 euros per 200cc for the day)! We spent six hours exploring the most remote corners of the island, dodging goats on secluded mountain roads and wandering through Drogarati’s Cave (a smaller version of St Michael’s Cave in Gibraltar) . Our strong point? Head to Myrtos Beach, which is considered one of the most spectacular beaches in Greece and also featured in the movie Captain Corelli’s Mandolin! We then returned to the capital Argostoli, where we had lunch and fed large sea turtles with our bread when the waiters weren’t looking.

On board

Where are we going to start? We’re not big fans of onboard entertainment, so we made good use of the cinema instead and watched several new movies at sea. There was also a well-equipped gym onboard, with a decent sauna and steam room, to help balance our nearly constant diet.

Our room was comfortable and there was plenty of choice between the Windjammer cafe buffet and the Minstrel dining room where it was more formal dining. We paid just over £600 each for the cruise which is great value considering all the places we visited and you can snack on anytime. We found the drinks weren’t too expensive (we didn’t buy a drinks package), but they do allow you to bring two bottles of wine on board. This is something we neglected to do, but looking back it would have been nice to enjoy them on the balcony one evening.

As to whether my girlfriend enjoyed the cruise, she is already planning to book another one for next summer – so they must have done something right!

More information: www.royalcaribbean.com

Ikos will open a second establishment in Corfu • Hotel Designs

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Ikos Resorts has announced the sixth addition to its luxury all-inclusive portfolio, with the opening of Ikos Odisia in Corfu scheduled for the second quarter of 2023. The second Ikos to open on the Greek island, Ikos Odisia is in a emblematic place, protected in an isolated bay in front of Ikos Dassia. Conceived by Nimand Architectsthe new Ikos Odisia is gracefully elevated for spectacular views and landscape panoramas of the Ionian Sea.

Surrounded by a fragrant forest, the serene resort has 395 rooms, suites, bungalows, and villas, each carefully designed for couples and families of all sizes. Sprinkled invitingly across 60 acres and blending seamlessly into the lush natural surroundings, Ikos Odisia will welcome guests to an elegant waterfront ambience, combining relaxed beach living with luxurious and chic interiors. The five-star property will welcome the outdoors indoors, taking full advantage of the unspoiled nature that surrounds the resort. Those looking for the ultimate Ikos experience can opt for the exclusive Deluxe Collection suites, in an unparalleled area of ​​the resort with personalized pre-arrival planning via a personal concierge and a range of benefits.

Image credit: Ikos Resorts

Guests of the new Ikos Odisia can expect the group’s award-winning all-inclusive Infinite Lifestyle concept, bringing next-level relaxation to virtually every element of the holiday, with menus created by Michelin-starred chefs, spa experiences signed Anne Semonin Paris and 24-hour room service. Also included as part of their stay, guests can dine at select local restaurants, including a tempting option on Vidos Island, accessible only by private boat.

The resort will have five a la carte restaurants, with menus created by Michelin-starred chefs featuring flavors from Greece, Italy, Peru and Asia, as well as a Mediterranean buffet-style restaurant. Creative cocktails and a choice of 300 international and local wines will be served by Ikos’ expert sommeliers and mixologists at the hotel’s indoor and outdoor bars, which offer a venue for all occasions, from casual beach bars to elegant live music backdrops. Taking full advantage of the resort’s elevated location, Ikos Odisia’s exclusive new restaurant, The View Lounge, welcomes guests with incredible views of the Ionian Sea and will serve cocktails, light snacks and a full celebratory dinner menu. a fusion of Peruvian cuisine.

The resort will offer ten heated outdoor and indoor swimming pools, including children’s and adult-only pools, as well as a 420m white-sand beach surrounded by fragrant pine, citrus and olive trees, and overlooking crystal-clear waters. Beach service serving food and drink and 30 minutes of free babysitting on the beach for children over four will also be offered. Those wishing to stay active during their holiday can take advantage of the state-of-the-art fitness center or take advantage of the range of sports facilities and activities from tennis to canoeing, mountain biking or windsurfing. The Ikos Spa offers breathtaking views of the Ionian Sea, the perfect setting for a luxurious signature treatment, with beauty products from Anne Semonin Paris.

As with all Ikos properties, Ikos Odisia will help the local community to have a positive impact on the economy of Corfu Island and the destination as a whole, one of the most cosmopolitan and attractive destinations in Greece. The station will work with local suppliers and generate 700 new jobs, at least half of which will be filled by locals. Ikos Odisia will also establish sustainable hotel operations under the Ikos Green program, including being carbon neutral and implementing zero waste initiatives.

Main image credit: Ikos Resorts

Greek government rolls back laws on massive arms purchases: opposition

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The Greek government has canceled applicable laws on massive arms purchases, an opposition lawmaker said on Monday.

In an article she wrote for Efsyn media, Sofia Sakorafa of the MeRA25 party drew attention to dozens of bulk arms purchases that were approved and cost billions of euros in the last three meetings of Parliament’s Standing Committee on National Defense and Foreign Affairs in June. June 22, 27 and July 4.

With early elections now possible, the government is urging the committee to speed up the approval process to fulfill its promises made to the United States, she said.

Sakorafa noted that the government rolls back legislative frameworks and laws claiming these arms deals are “urgent” and therefore uses government-to-government contact schemes that the laws only allow under exceptional conditions.

These practices serve clientelism in the country and increase dependence on the United States while the already impoverished Greek people have to bear the immense cost, she said.

Sakorafa finally called on all political parties in Greece, especially the main opposition party SYRIZA-PS and the Communist Party of Greece (KKE), to react against the government’s practices.

“It is our responsibility towards the Greek people,” she concluded.

Greece has also recently signed several costly arms agreements with Israel for the purchase of drones and missiles, with France for the purchase of Rafael fighter jets and with the United States for the update of its F-16 fighter jets for the latest Viper configuration.

Most recently, the US State Department approved the sale of four warships worth $6.9 billion to Greece as well as existing frigate modernization transactions worth $2. $5 billion.

Greece has also expressed interest in purchasing at least 20 American-made F-35 fighter jets.

Turkey has often warned Greece against an arms race, offering instead to resolve all outstanding issues, including in the Aegean Sea, the Eastern Mediterranean and the island of Cyprus, through dialogue.

Turkey will not give up its rights to the Aegean Sea and will not hesitate to use its powers deriving from international agreements, President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan said last month while attending the Efes-2022 military exercise organized on the Aegean coasts.

Greece should stop arming the islands with non-military status and abide by international agreements, he said of a resurgence in long-running tensions between Aegean neighbors.

“I warn Greece to avoid dreams, deeds and statements that will cause regret. Come to your senses,” he said in a televised address as he observed Turkish military exercises on the coast of the western province of Izmir.

“Turkey will not give up its rights to the Aegean Sea and will not give up the use of rights established by international agreements when it comes to arming islands.”

Greece is violating treaties by arming islands in the Aegean Sea, Foreign Minister Mevlüt Çavuşoğlu also said, warning that the islands’ sovereignty will be in question if it fails to demilitarize them.

Greece has built a military presence on the Aegean islands in violation of the 1923 Treaty of Lausanne and the 1947 Treaty of Paris, he said, adding that the islands were ceded to Greece on the condition that ‘they remain demilitarized.

In recent months, Turkey has stepped up its criticism of Greece stationing troops on islands in the eastern Aegean, near the Turkish coast and in many cases visible from the shore. These islands were to be demilitarized under the 1923 Treaty of Lausanne and the 1947 Treaty of Paris, so any troops or weapons on the islands are strictly prohibited.

In addition, Turkey and Greece have traded accusations of airspace violations in recent weeks. Turkey is demanding that Greece demilitarize its eastern islands, now that this action is required under 20th-century treaties that ceded sovereignty of the islands to Greece. Turkish authorities say the Greeks stationed troops on the Aegean islands in violation of peace treaties that followed World War I and World War II.

Greece continues to militarize the eastern Aegean islands, in violation of both the 1923 Treaty of Lausanne and the 1947 Treaty of Paris. Despite international agreements and treaties, Greece remains adamant about the stationing of its armed forces on the islands in the eastern Aegean, especially the neighboring Dodecanese and small islets, including islands and islets very close to the western coast of Turkey, many of which are within sight from the shore.

Greece has placed its armed forces on the Aegean islands since the early 1960s despite numerous objections from Turkey and its obligations under international agreements. Turkey has reiterated its objections in this regard, pleading with various international organizations and institutions to take action on the matter and put an end to Greece’s actions in this direction. Athens counters that the troops are stationed in response to the presence of Turkish military units, aircraft and landing craft on the opposite coast.

Turkey and Greece disagree on a number of issues, including competing claims to jurisdiction in the eastern Mediterranean, overlapping claims to their continental shelves, maritime borders, airspace, energy, the ethnically divided island of Cyprus, the status of islands in the Aegean Sea and migrants.

Tensions erupted again last month when Erdoğan said Greek Prime Minister Mitsotakis “no longer exists” for him, accusing him of trying to block sales of F-16 fighter jets to the Turkey during a visit to the United States.

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Holidays in Greece: Greece changes Covid travel rules for UK tourists – latest news | Travel News | Travel

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Before the rule change, British tourists to Greece had to self-isolate for five days in a designated quarantine hotel if they tested positive. Quarantine hotels are no longer mandatory for tourists who test positive.

It will now be up to tourists to decide whether to self-isolate if they test positive while on vacation in Greece.

Infected tourists will also be able to use public transport but will need to wear an FPP2 or KN95 face mask to do so.

The country is believed to have changed the rules to align with other European countries over Covid.

Epidemiologist Christos Hatzichristodoulou told local media: “There has been a lot of discussion about how to deal with outbreaks in tourist accommodation and we have decided to apply what applies to the rest of the Mediterranean countries, because the majority of northern European countries have no measures. at all to protect against the coronavirus.

READ MORE: British expats: Europe’s cheapest resorts

Greece had already lifted all travel entry restrictions, including rules on vaccine certificates, on May 1.

TUI said it expects Greece to see the highest level of demand this year as it becomes one of Europe’s most popular destinations.

A TUI spokesperson said: “Greece is again this summer one of the most popular holiday destinations.

“We anticipate the highest level of demand ever.

DO NOT MISS

“In total, the group is expected to bring around three million holidaymakers to Greece.

“Higher visitor numbers than before the pandemic, when it was around 2.8 million.”

The capital, Athens, is one of the most visited destinations in Greece with many tourists traveling to see the incredible ancient sites.

Tourists can also sample Greek culinary delights in the capital or enjoy a cocktail in the Old Town.

READ MORE: EasyJet strikes: affected airports and dates

The Greek islands are among the country’s biggest tourist attractions, with many visitors traveling every year to enjoy the beaches.

More than 300,000 tourists visited Corfu in June and hotels were almost at capacity before the summer.

Tourists who like to party tend to head to Mykonos or Zante, both of which have lively nightlife.

However, British tourists could face a chaotic summer with delays and cancellations likely to disrupt some holidays.

EasyJet and Ryanair staff are on strike in Spain in July, which could upset some tourists.

Tourists have also faced long queues at UK airports as the industry struggles to recruit enough staff.

British Airways, easyJet, TUI and Wizz Air have all canceled flights as the UK heads into the peak summer season.

Passengers whose flights have been canceled are entitled to an alternative flight on the day of their scheduled trip, if one is available.

Frontier Airlines Says It’s Missing Votes For Spirit Merger

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title=Meara,

FLE – A line of Spirit Airlines aircraft sits on the tarmac at Orlando International Airport on May 20, 2020 in Orlando, Florida. Spirit announced Thursday, July 7, 2022 that it would again postpone a vote on the proposed merger with Frontier, a sign of a lack of shareholder support for the merger in the face of a competing bid from JetBlue Airways. Spirit delayed the vote for a week, until July 15. (AP Photo/Chris O’Meara, File)

PA

Frontier Airlines, facing likely defeat in its bid to merge with Spirit Airlines, says it’s done with a bidding war and is asking for another postponement of a shareholder vote on the deal.

Frontier CEO Barry Biffle said in a letter made public on Monday that his airline was “very far” from winning the approval of Spirit shareholders, who are considering a more expensive takeover bid from JetBlue Airways.

A shareholder vote at Spirit, already postponed three times, is scheduled for Friday.

Spirit’s board backed a February deal with Frontier to join the two discount airlines.

“However, we are still a long way from obtaining approval from Spirit shareholders based on the proxy data we received as of July 8,” Biffle told Spirit CEO Ted Christie and attorney General, Thomas Canfield.

Voting scheduled for July 8 last Friday was postponed the night before, but Frontier and Spirit knew from proxy data how investors were voting. Major Spirit shareholders declined to comment.

Biffle said that if Spirit’s board changed its mind and backed JetBlue’s offer, Frontier would forfeit its right to match the offer. He said Frontier had already submitted its best and final offer.

Frontier’s CEO has asked for a further postponement of the vote, until July 27, if the merger plan has still not been voted for approval by Friday so that Frontier can have more time to lobby shareholders of Spirit.

Neither Spirit nor JetBlue immediately commented on Biffle’s letter, dated Sunday.

Frontier is offering Spirit shareholders $4.13 in cash and about 1.9 Frontier shares for each Spirit share, or less than $2.7 billion at Frontier’s closing price on Monday, even with a rally that saw Frontier has climbed 31% since hitting a 52-week low in mid-May. Spirit shareholders would own 48.5% of the combined airline.

JetBlue is offering $33.50 per share in cash and up to $34.15 per share — or about $3.7 billion — including a listing fee to cover a delay in closing the buy.

Since Spirit first pushed JetBlue back in April, the two have traded accusations of misinformation and bad faith bargaining. They have resumed talks, however, and last week JetBlue CEO Robin Hayes said he was “encouraged by our discussions with Spirit”.

Ryanair set to restart flight services from Zagreb

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Following flight cancellations and a reduction in services from Zagreb, Croatia, Irish low-cost airline Ryanair has announced the restoration of services. The restoration will take place over the next two weeks and will see a third aircraft stationed at the Croatian base.

Restarting flight services

Ryanair will restore frequencies on flights to Baden Baden, Bergamo, Beauvais, Charleroi, Gothenburg, Hahn, Malaga, Malmö, Malta, Memmingen, Paphos, Sandefjord and Weeze, as well as resuming operations to Basel, Sofia and Brindisi.

In addition to this, Ryanair’s flight to Corfu in Greece will be operated once a week.

SIMPLEFLYING VIDEO OF THE DAY

Ryanair will fly Zagreb – Corfu once a week. Photo: Getty Images.

“Ryanair is the leading airline in Europe and Croatia. We have seen strong summer bookings so far from Zagreb with a total of 27 routes. Ryanair’s three Zagreb-based aircraft represent a US$300 million investment, which will support more than ninety highly paid aviation jobs and more than 1,000 total jobs in Zagreb,” the company said. Aerial.

Ryanair also said: “As we look forward to a solid summer of bookings to/from Zagreb, Ryanair will be operating almost eighty weekly flights (over thirty more than last year) to offer our Zagreb customers an abundance of choice to major European destinations like London, Milan and Paris or popular holiday hotspots like Brindisi, Corfu and Malaga, while giving Zagreb inbound tourism a boost after two lost years.”


The cuts

In April this year, Ryanair announced that flights to Basel, Sofia and Brindis would be suspended. In addition, the airline announced that flights to Malaga, Sandefjord and Paphos would operate once a week and further reduced flights to Baden Baden, Bergamo, Charleroi, Gothenburg, Harhn, Malmö, Malta, Memmingen and Weeze.

Ryanair has not explained why they have scaled back operations in Zagreb, but it is suspected staff shortages in the Croatian capital and a lack of planes were to blame. Therefore, the airline launched a recruitment campaign to hire additional workers.

“In the coming years, the Ryanair Group and Lauda Europe will bring new opportunities to Croatia, which will translate into more traffic, jobs and career opportunities,” said the subsidiary’s COO. Ryanair, Lauda Europe, Tadej Notersberg.


Take control of Croatia

Ever since Ryanair opened its base in Zagreb, the airline has been making things difficult for Croatian Airlines. The carrier opened a base in July 2021 and offers 25 routes from the airport.

Zagreb Airport recently reported 300,000 passengers last month. Ryanair played a big role in this figure. Ryanair is a low-cost carrier and offers solid service compared to Croatia Airlines, which is more expensive.

Croatia Airlines is in great competition with Ryanair. Photo: Croatia Airlines

Following Ryanair’s landing in Zagreb, Croatia Airlines was forced to reduce the cost of flights to be competitive. A blow for the airline.

Business is booming

Last week, Ryanair released its monthly passenger figures for June 2022. The airline recorded 15.9 million passengers in June with a load factor of 95%. June is when most families and Europeans like to go abroad on their holidays, and that seems to be going strong at Ryanair.


However, the airline is facing some operational challenges as cabin crew in Spain are due to strike this month. Ryanair said the effects would be minimal.

What do you think of flight catering? Have you flown with Ryanair to Zagreb? Comments below.

Greek philosophy leads the way as the island has a ‘green’ way of life

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03:12

Wind and solar power, plus an 85% recycling rate, show how an idyllic Greek island is leading the way to an eco-friendly community.

Greece is perhaps best known for its ancient civilization, but the GR-eco project on a number of Greek islands in the Dodecanese archipelago is attracting attention as a green example to follow.

Locals and tourists alike have embraced the environmental approach which has also been made possible by massive investment from the European Union (EU).

Located between Nisyros to the north and Rhodes to the south, Tilos is home to a host of pioneering programs. You could say it’s an island of the future.

The Greek island of Tilos uses wind and solar energy to provide power. /AFP

The Greek island of Tilos uses wind and solar energy to provide power. /AFP

A small solar park in the middle of the S-shaped island and a single wind turbine in the northern part, are enough to supply the whole island with electricity.

Unconsumed energy is stored in an EU-funded battery facility or sent to nearby islands.

“For the past 30 years, our policy and individual goals have been to protect and preserve the environment,” said Tilos Mayor Maria Aliferi.

“That’s our philosophy. We want to live in harmony with the environment. That’s why we take these kinds of initiatives. But the project is not just about us. Most of the time, we produce more energy than necessary, so we export it to our neighboring islands, through submarine cables.The cables that once transferred fossil fuels, now transfer renewable energies.

The green approach does not stop there.

The local government has gone further by implementing a zero waste policy.

A program called “Just Go Zero Tilos” puts into practice the circular management of all waste produced on the island.

It does this using door-to-door pickups. A group of about 20 people with trucks and vans go door to door and collect waste from homes and businesses.

They then transfer them to the old landfill which has been transformed into a recycling plant where the waste is separated to produce powdered glass, cement mix and fertilizer compost.

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The average recycling rate on the island is now 85%. /AFP

The average recycling rate on the island is now 85%. /AFP

Recycling

Efforts are also made to produce less non-recyclable goods.

“Our recycling rate is constantly increasing, but we have a different goal, we want our community to use less non-recyclable products,” said waste collector Dimitris Kaltsas. “Recycling is a way of life anyway. Our goal is to use fewer products that we don’t need.”

Tilos is a small island in the South Aegean, two hours from Rhodes and 15 hours from the mainland, but it exports a lasting culture that could have an impact around the world.

“Green initiatives on other islands, such as Chalki or Astypalea are part of the Tilos project,” Mayor Aliferi said. “The idea of ​​the Green Greek Islands was inspired by what we are doing here. Even an EU committee came to Tilos asking us how we did it, so they could apply it to other islands. This is the real success for us, we want others to follow.”

‘Stand with the people of Sri Lanka’: India as protests grip the island nation

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Arindam Bagchi, spokesman for the MEA, said India stood with the people of Sri Lanka as the economic crisis deepened in the island nation.

Protesters celebrate after entering the presidential secretariat during a protest, following the flight of President Gotabaya Rajapaksa (Picture: Reuters)

Amid the economic crisis and ongoing protests in Sri Lanka, Ministry of External Affairs (MEA) spokesperson Arindam Bagchi said that India and Sri Lanka are the closest neighbors and that the two countries share deep civilizational ties. Arindam Bagchi said India stands with the people of Sri Lanka and is following recent developments in the island nation.

“We continue to closely follow recent developments in Sri Lanka. India stands with the people of Sri Lanka as they seek to realize their aspirations for prosperity and progress through democratic means and values, established institutions and a constitutional framework,” said Arindam Bagchi.

Thousands of protesters stormed the official residence of Sri Lankan President Gotabaya Rajapaksa, demanding his resignation as the economic crisis intensified. Moments before protesters stormed his official residence, President Gotabaya Rajapaksa fled. Protesters also set fire to the private residence of Sri Lankan Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe.

INDIA EXTENDS AID TO SRI LANKA

The cash-strapped nation is struggling to make ends meet and pay for imports of these basic necessities and is already in default on its debt. The island nation is seeking monetary aid from neighboring India, China and also the International Monetary Fund.

“We are aware of the many challenges facing Sri Lanka and its people, and we have stood with the people of Sri Lanka as they try to overcome this difficult time,” the MEA spokesperson said.

READ ALSO| Protesters say millions found inside Sri Lankan president’s home: report

India has provided over $3.8 billion in support to Sri Lanka to help overcome the economic crisis.

“In line with Sri Lanka’s central place in our Neighborhood First Policy, India itself has provided unprecedented support of over $3.8 billion this year to alleviate the dire economic situation in Sri Lanka,” said Arindam Bagchi.

President Rajapaksa announced he would step down on July 13 after protesters stormed his official residence and burned down Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe’s house. Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe also agreed to step down.

— ENDS —

Ryanair will restore the Zagreb network

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Low-cost airline Ryanair is restoring destinations and frequencies from its base in Zagreb over the next two weeks after more than two consecutive months of cuts and suspensions. The airline will bring back a third aircraft stationed in the Croatian capital, allowing it to restore frequencies on a number of routes, as well as resume operations to Basel, Sofia and Brindisi. In addition, the low-cost carrier will restore frequencies on flights to Baden Baden, Bergamo, Beauvais, Charleroi, Gothenburg, Hahn, Malaga, Malmö, Malta, Memmingen, Paphos, Sandefjord and Weeze. On the other hand, its newly launched service between Zagreb and Corfu has been reduced to a weekly rotation and will remain so. Ryanair never provided a reason for the cuts, although staffing issues and a lack of equipment were partly to blame.

Commenting on its operations in Zagreb, the airline said: “Ryanair is the number one airline in Europe and Croatia. We have seen strong summer bookings so far from Zagreb with a total of 27 routes. The three Zagreb-based Ryanair aircraft represent a US$300 million investment, which will support over ninety highly paid aviation jobs and over 1,000 total jobs in Zagreb”. He added: “As we look forward to a solid summer of bookings to/from Zagreb, Ryanair will be operating almost eighty weekly flights (over thirty more than last year) to offer our Zagreb customers a plenty of choice to major European destinations like London, Milan and Paris or popular holiday hotspots like Brindisi, Corfu and Malaga, while giving Zagreb inbound tourism a boost after two lost years.”

This year, Ryanair has temporarily suspended or reduced its number of flights from Zagreb for a total of five months. In January and February, sixteen of Ryanair’s routes from the Croatian capital were temporarily suspended due to a drop in demand resulting from a resurgence of the coronavirus pandemic, while the latest reductions and suspensions began in May and were finally extended until mid-July. Ryanair has quickly become the second largest airline in Zagreb in terms of passengers carried, capacity offered and number of flights, while it is the first airline in the Croatian capital in terms of the number of destinations offered.

Eco-focused getaways

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Mantas and marine biology in the Maldives

I’ve had the privilege of spending a lot of time in the Maldives, and also reporting on marine conservation programs around the world that are innovative and impactful. Two resorts, virtually at opposite ends of this atoll nation, channel its beauty and help safeguard its ecosystems in real and measurable ways.

Swimming with manta rays at Six Senses Laamu © Andy Ball

Four Seasons Resort at Landaa Giraavaru is home to the Maldivian Manta Ray Project and hosts the only full-time manta ray research project in the Maldives. Hanifaru Bay, home to one of the largest populations of manta rays in the world, is a 25-minute boat ride away, and guests can get up close and personal with the gentle giants in exciting and personal ways. At the Autonomous Marine Research Center, biologists oversee coral and reef recovery programs and a national sea turtle rehabilitation program. I’ve always been impressed by how many resort staff members could explain manta breeding statistics or trash collection programs while serving wine or fixing your bike.

A beachfront pool at the Four Seasons Resort Maldives

A beachfront pool at the Four Seasons Resort Maldives

Beach views at the Four Seasons

Beach views at the Four Seasons

Far to the south is Six Senses Laamu, which employs 10 full-time marine biologists who feed data to the Maldives Underwater Initiative and collaborate with the Blue Marine Foundation, which secures marine protected areas and identifies unsustainable and illegal fishing in the whole world. “Be a Marine Biologist for a Day” is on the agenda in many places in the Maldives; here, your kids can be one each afternoon, with one-on-one mentorship from one of these scientists.

The diving jetty of the Six Senses Laamu diving school

The diving jetty of the Six Senses Laamu diving school

Any trip to the Maldives is a major investment, and the moral issues around long-haul travel are only getting worse. But the country’s economy relies heavily on tourism. When friends and acquaintances ask me if it’s even justifiable to go there these days, Landaa and Laamu give me reason to think that I can – always – answer in the affirmative. From $1,700, fourseasons.com


A trip with the Mediterranean Preservation Society

Hotel La Sirena in Filicudi
Hotel La Sirena in Filicudi

Ibiza and ‘marine preservation’ might not intuitively go together in spirit. They did for Ben Goldsmith, however, when he and a small group of friends set up IbizaPreservation in 2008. Soon after, Goldsmith visited the Aeolian Islands of Sicily; struck by their beauty, and in particular by the pristine seas that surround them, he and his co-founder Luca Del Bono created the Aeolian Islands Preservation Fund. As in Ibiza, it incorporates some land initiatives – dry-stone wall courses, waste management – ​​but its primary mandate was, and still is, marine protection.

Dine al fresco at one of The Thinking Traveler's rentals in Paxos

Dine al fresco at one of The Thinking Traveler’s rentals in Paxos

The stone exterior of the house

The stone exterior of the house

That means everything from lobbying for the creation of protected reserves, to driving and funding local initiatives for sustainable fishing and good old-fashioned clean-ups (in peak season, the Aeolian annual population of around 10,000 can inflate up to 10 times this number or more: that’s a lot of waste that inevitably ends up in the sea). Goldsmith’s current project is the UK-based Conservation Collective, whose members span from the Hebrides to Sri Lanka. In the Mediterranean you will find CC affiliates doing their work in Greece (the Cyclades Preservation Fund, the Ionian Environment Foundation) and throughout the Balearic Islands. You can donate and participate: visit the websites to find out how.

A lounge at the Principe di Salina

A lounge at the Principe di Salina

The Principe di Salina swimming pool

The Principe di Salina swimming pool

The Thinking Traveler makes a donation to the Collective for each of its villa rentals in Sicily, Mallorca and the Greek Islands (and encourages its customers to do the same). These range from the gentle stone houses of Paxos to the sprawling estates of Corfu. Or opt for a hotel: you could hole up in the Aeolian Islands at Principe di Salina, or filicudi’s barefoot chic La Sirena: both offer great value, eternal views and AIPF programming on your doorstep . conservation-collective.org. Ionian Villas from £3,480 per week, sleeps six, thethinkingtraveller.com. Principe di Salina, from €190, principledisalina.it. The Sirena Filicudi, from €170, lasirenafilicudi.com


Save Vancouver Island Salmon

The Ivanhoe Lounge at Clayoquot Wilderness Lodge
The Ivanhoe Lounge at Clayoquot Wilderness Lodge

Since beginning its existence in 2000, Clayoquot Wilderness Lodge has evolved into Vancouver Island’s address for indulgence; a bastion of soft linens, silver tableware and indoor-outdoor showers brilliantly described by HTSI contributor Stanley Stewart as resembling “a camp of miners who struck gold and called the designers”. But it’s style rather than substance here – which is one of the reasons why Australia-based Baillie Lodges, which is known for its pioneering environmental programs across that country , recently took over its management.

Paddleboarding at Clayoquot Wilderness Lodge
Paddleboarding at Clayoquot Wilderness Lodge

Since 2001, Clayoquot has worked with the Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada and the Ahousaht First Nations to create salmon spawning habitats and restore native stocks around the Bedwell River watershed, where the lodge is located. Salmon are a major indicator and component of the local ecosystem and local economy, so ensuring their continued presence is essential. It’s just part of the resort’s environmental legacy program, privately funded by Baillie Lodges and the proceeds of guest stays. From around £1,800 all inclusive, clayoquotwildernesslodge.com


New Zealand’s coastal wetland paradise

Restored coastline at Tahi on New Zealand's North Island
Restored coastline at Tahi on New Zealand’s North Island

Coastal conservation is also marine conservation. Healthy wetlands and salt marshes are linked to healthy bird, fish and insect populations, and they are mega carbon sinks. In Tahi, on New Zealand’s North Island, the fourth generation of a family of beekeepers has spent years restoring a once nearly dilapidated farm of some 316 hectares east of Whangarei into its wilderness of origin.

Tahi's Mara bungalow

Tahi’s Mara bungalow

They have revitalized dunes, littoral forest and coastal marshes, in some cases not only restoring but increasing the carbon storage capacities of the latter. A recent addition to Tahi’s offering – which includes, of course, various delicious and nutritious Manuka honeys – is a small eco-retreat made up of three independent properties: Hiwi, Mara and Tara. The first two are warm contemporary bungalows that can accommodate four people, with bathroom and large wooden terraces; Tara is a more comfortable cottage, with bunk beds for the children and a charming old-fashioned kitchen. All have access to Tahi’s private beach and hiking trails; bicycles, boogie boards, and kayaks are available upon request. And your money is directly invested in the restoration and development of the reserve. From 250 NZD (around £130) per night for the cottage, around £155 per night for the bungalows, tahinz.com

Gundari Resort: Australian investment in the Greek island of Folegandros

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By Ilias Karagiannis.

In recent months, the Greek islands have become a magnet for national and international investors in the development of sustainable tourism.

This comes as the Greek government has taken specific initiatives and created fertile ground for sustainable development investments.

The long-term plan to ensure that tourism in Greece continues to grow in a sustainable way is called “GR-eco Islands” and aims to promote an integrated green conversion of small islands (up to 5,000 inhabitants).

At the same time, it has created a narrative that has gone around the world and has become a new marketing tool that promotes the product and domestic tourism investment.

Through “GR-Eco Islands”, the islands will become models of sustainability through the application of new technologies and methods in areas such as waste management, green transport and energy production.

Folegandros is one of the 40 islands that have joined this program and an Australian company has decided to lay the foundations for its sustainable development, while stimulating the local economy of the island.

The Gundari Resort, which will open in 2023 if the timetable is respected, is the idea of ​​an Australian, Ricardo Larieras, who aspires to create a commercial name by creating luxury hotels promoting the development of sustainable tourism. .

The opening ceremony of the construction work took place about two weeks ago and this project should give a new impetus to the island, as admitted by the mayor of Folegandros, Efthalia Papadopoulou, who spoke with The Greek Herald about this great investment.

“We are very satisfied with the implementation of such an investment whose design combines luxury and sustainability. It is important that every new investor loves and respects our place and the environment, like Ricardo, so that Folegandros manages to preserve the uniqueness of its nature and culture,” says Ms. Papadopoulou.

“Of course, every new investment, and especially a big investment like that from the Australian company, is a significant boost to the economy of our island.”

The presence of the Australian Ambassador and the new investment:

The project will be carried out by the Greek architecture firm Block722, based in Athens and which sets as a priority the complete harmonization of the luxury hotel with the wild nature of the island.

The groundbreaking ceremony also took place in the presence of the Australian Ambassador to Greece, Arthur Spyrou, who praised the beauty of the island and underlined the love of Australians for Greece, its culture and the uniqueness of its nature.

Ambassador Spyrou said Australian investor interest in Greece was very high. something confirmed The Greek Herald by the mayor of Folegandros.

“Australian Ambassador Arthur Spyrou expressed his admiration for Folegandros and, together with other Australians who have visited the island, discussed the possibility of another investment,” Ms Papadopoulou reveals.

“With the exception of the two-year pandemic, every year Australian citizens visit our island and consistently express interest.”

That’s what happened to Ricardo, an advertising manager in Sydney, when he fell in love with Folegandros and wanted to start Gundari Resorts from there.

The wild, almost mystical beauty of Folegandros impresses its visitor and binds his thoughts to the times he spent there. The mayor of Folegandros highly recommends the island to those who have not visited it.

“Folegandros is an island that has retained its natural color, its traditional character and in combination with its crystal clear beaches and its special Chora with the castle and the imposing church of Panagia at the top of the settlement, stands out and has emerged as one of first tourist destinations. We are waiting for you,” she said.

Gundari Folegandros will be completed in two stages. The first of 26 rooms will open in 2023, while the second will be ready within two years, with the number of rooms reaching a total of 50.

Staying at the resort will be fully in tune with the relaxed rhythms of island life, while its aim is to connect guests not only with nature, but also with experiences that will change their outlook on life.

It is also an Australian investment that will significantly boost the island’s local economy.

OTE signs loan agreement with EBRD

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OTE, owned by Deutsche Telekom, on Thursday signed an agreement to raise 150 million euros through a loan agreement with the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development – the country’s first in the digital investment pillar – with the use funds from the National Recovery and Resilience Facility “Greece 2.0”, financed by NextGenerationEU.

These funds will contribute to the deployment of the Fiber to the Home (FTTH) network by OTE in the Greek region as part of its investment plan which is expected to exceed 3 billion euros by 2027.

The agreement was signed at ΟΤΕ headquarters by Dirk Werner, Director and Head of Telecommunications, Media and Technology at the EBRD, and OTE Group Chairman and CEO Michael Tsamaz, in the presence of Finance Minister Christos Staikouras, his alternate Thodoros Skylakakis and the governor of the Greek Recovery and Resilience Agency, Nikos Mantzoufas.

Funds from the Greek Recovery and Resilience Facility will provide OTE with additional liquidity for the partial implementation of its FTTH roll-out plan: it will specifically finance the roll-out to around 371,000 households and businesses in 12 regions (Achaia , Halkidiki, Corfu, Cyclades, Dodecanese, Evros, Larissa, Lefkada, Rethymno, Rodopi, Trikala and Xanthi) by 2027, contributing substantially to the digital development of these provinces. As fiber networks are more energy efficient, the expansion of the FTTH network will contribute significantly to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and the green transition of the economy.

Staikouras said that “the loan agreement between OTE and the EBRD confirms the crucial role of the national recovery and resilience plan “Greece 2.0″ in the implementation of investments for the digital transition which will have concrete results. in improving the daily lives of citizens and which will contribute significantly to promoting regional growth and innovation.

“Thanks to this investment, which will provide access to the FTTH fiber optic network in 12 regions in the coming years, the digital infrastructure is strengthened and the country’s competitiveness and investment attractiveness are enhanced. The government will continue to work methodically and efficiently to make the best use of NGEU funds and achieve high, sustainable and inclusive growth.

From Maura Higgins to Jack Keating: Irish stars who rocked the Love Island villa

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Irish competitors have brought fire and passion to our screens over the years, with many making their entrances (and exits) during the infamous challenge, which sees the native islanders crack with six new boys and girls before deciding to stay with their couple at the villa or team up with a new hottie.

From the unforgettable Maura Higgins to the age-old bombshells of Casa Amor, we’ve compiled a list of the best and worst Irish Love Island stars of all time.

Dami Hope – Series 8

Dami entered the Love Island villa last month and has had a truly rocky journey since, going from fan favorite to most hated islander in a matter of days thanks to his antics at Casa Amor.

The Wexford native was originally paired with Amber but, after she was dumped from the island, he decided to pursue Indiyah, and all was well until the girls were taken to Casa Amor for the ultimate test.

While the girls were away, Dami wreaked havoc by locking lips with the bombshell Summer, telling the boys he “did nothing wrong” and encouraging the others to crack up with the new girls.

But have the microbiologist’s escapades in recent days cost him his relationship with Indiyah and the £50,000 prize in the Love Island finale?

Jack Keating – Series 8

Jack Keating, the son of Boyzone star Ronan Keating and model Yvonne Connolly, walked into Casa Amor this week with high hopes of finding love.

However, the 23-year-old has barely had any screen time since dropping the bombshell on his famous father during a chat with Gemma (whose father is none other than footballer Michael Owen ), prompting some fans to joke that he’s busy recovering from “severe sunburn on that doughy Irish skin”.

Greg O’Shea – Series 5

Limerick boy Greg entered the Love Island villa towards the end of the 2019 series and ended up winning the top prize with Amber Gill.

The pair dated for a short time after winning the show, but called it quits a month later.

Greg has since competed in the 2021 Tokyo Olympics as part of the Irish rugby sevens team and recently launched his own training and wellness app, Bettr With Greg.

Adam Maxted – Series 2

The first contender to put Ireland on the Love Island map was Belfast native Adam, who entered the villa in week two and finished in fourth place with Katie Salmon.

Following his stint on the hit dating show, the 30-year-old launched his professional wrestling career and is now a personal trainer based in Marbella.

Maura Higgins – Series 5

Perhaps the most successful Irishman to emerge from the villa is Longford lady Maura Higgins, who became a household name after coining the phrase ‘fanny flutters’.

Maura’s dirty jokes and fiery personality earned her a spot in the finals with dancer Curtis Pritchard.

The pair dated for a total of nine months and Maura then dated fellow Love Island alum, Chris Taylor.

Since her time on Love Island, Maura has branched out into television presenting and has secured branding deals with Ann Summers, Bellamianta and Inglot, as well as being signed to global modeling agency Elite.

Rob Lipsett – Series 3

Rob Lipsett is one of Ireland’s hottest influencers these days, but many forget he got his start on Love Island.

The Dubliner walked into Casa Amor like a bombshell in 2017 but failed to strike up a romantic relationship with any of the girls.

Speaking after his stint on the show, the fitness YouTuber and business owner said he was not a big fan of the experience.

He said, “Basically in reality TV you have to create drama. They wanted me to gossip and talk people down and that’s not my style.

Shannen Reilly McGrath – Series 3

Another Irish Casa Amor bombshell that never made it to the main villa was Dubliner Shannen, who was jettisoned from the island three days after her first appearance on the show.

But the former dental nurse from Tallaght has no qualms about not making a good impression on the show, as she admitted she’s been logging on to Love Island over the past few weeks and supporting Ekin-Su and Paige.

Matthew MacNabb – Series 7

Matthew, from Downpatrick, wrote the Love Island history books in 2021 after ending his relationship with Kaz Kamwi with just two simple words (“We’re done”).

After appearing as a bombshell from Casa Amor, he returned to the main villa but was dumped after just 13 days.

Earlier this year, the 27-year-old took part in Dancing With the Stars where he was introduced to his girlfriend, Laura Nolan.

The couple moved to Marbella for the summer where Matthew plans to focus on creating fitness content.

Kaila Troy – Series 7

Also representing Ireland at Casa Amor last year, the Dubliner Kaila Troy, international DJ and creator of OnlyFans.

Her time on the show was short-lived, however, as she failed to find love during the infamous home swap.

Now living in Los Angeles, Kaila’s music career continues to thrive and she hopes to delve more into the world of entertainment in the future.

Salma Naran – Series 7

Salma was the third Irish arrival on Love Island last summer but struggled to impress the native islanders while at Casa Amor.

Fans of the show complained about the 21-year-old’s lack of airtime after she was kicked off the show, but she has always maintained that her Love Island experience was nothing short of “amazing”.

Yewande Biala – Series 5

Yewande, 26, was part of the original Islanders roster in 2019.

The Dubliner had a hard time in the villa and had a whirlwind romance with Danny Williams, but was kicked off the island just three weeks after Danny decided to pair up with Arabella instead.

She’s now set to open up about her sanity and identity in her upcoming book, Reclaiming, out later this month.

Greece travel guide: Everything you need to know before you go

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greece is the sweet, hippy brother of the mediterranean family. Its craggy islands topped with distinctive clusters of sugar-cube houses are the subject of travel advertisements the world over – but there’s more color and contrast to this nation than the pin-ups (usually of the Cycladic islands).

From the hot, dusty hills of Athens and crumbling temples – with graffitied streets and a big bar scene that the marketing photos also overlook – to tiny time-trapped islands like Milos and Symi, you could go to Greece 20 summers in a row and barely scratches the surface of its pretty landscapes.

But wherever you go, you’re likely to encounter the proud hospitality, rustic home cooking and uniformly charming coves that make it a summer hit with honeymooners, solo backpackers and young families.

Current travel restrictions and entry requirements

Greece dropped all of its remaining Covid requirements on April 29, 2022. Travelers can enter without testing or quarantine, regardless of their vaccination status. The requirement to wear face masks in many indoor settings was also removed on June 1, with masks currently only required on public transport and in hospitals.

Ministers said the suspension of the use of a vaccine passport (showing proof of vaccination to enter certain indoor venues) will initially last through the summer months, with the government monitoring developments in Covid cases ahead of a examination at the end of August.

Best time to go

Although many Greece lovers – especially families – flock to its coasts and islands during the peak summer weeks, the country is hot, windy and less crowded in the shoulder seasons: May to early June and from September to October.

In early spring – March and April – you may still experience highs and lows or drizzle, so if you want sunshine you should play it safe with a trip in May. Some accommodations on holiday islands like Santorini only open from spring to autumn.

Athens gets very hot in the summer months, so it’s best seen in early spring or late fall, when you can comfortably hike around the hilly sights with a bit of coolness and bursts of Sun.

Like many countries in the midst of climate change this decade, Greece experienced a historic heatwave in the summer of 2021, with wildfires breaking out at temperatures of up to 47C. If you are going from July to August you will want to make sure you are next to the pool or the sea.

Main regions and cities

Every group of islands in the vast expanse of Greek sea is worth your time, but the most popular for vacationers are the Ionian Islands, the Cyclades and the Dodecanese. On top of that there are beautiful stretches of mainland coastline and tiny islands much closer to the mainland.

The Cyclades: including Santorini and Mykonos

For clusters of sugar cube buildings, quaint windmills and jaw-dropping cliffs, you want the Cyclades – Santorini is one of the more expensive places, but definitely worth it if you like your luxury . But Syros, the “Cinderella of the Cyclades”, is also having a moment right now.

The Ionians: including Corfu and Kefalonia

The Ionians are more terrestrial with greener landscapes, great hiking and family-friendly hotels, and goats perched on steep cliffs.

The Dodecanese: including Rhodes and Kos

Byzantine and medieval treasures, as well as family-friendly beach hotels, make the Dodecanese a hit with history buffs and families alike.

Athens

Athens is an essential city break. It comes with some really old and must-see sights, tons of archeological and mythical nerdiness for Classics fans, and a fun and affordable bar and restaurant scene. There are also a host of stylish, good-value boutique hotels, many with small rooftops giving you views of the majestic Acropolis hill.

Crete

Crete is increasingly popular for its mix of natural beauty, historic sites (it’s home to Knossos, the ‘Palace of the Minotaur’) and its outstanding culinary scene in a nation with admittedly similar menus across the board.

It is true that all the large Greek islands have a festive city. But, being larger in size, for each bustling nightlife strip, they have dozens of beautiful, quiet bays with low-key accommodation. This means you should do some geographical research before you go to make sure the atmosphere is right for you.

Best under-the-radar destinations

Lefkada and Zakynthos

Kefalonia may have attracted Captain Corelli’s Mandolin fans with its rustic beauty for decades, but Lefkada and Zakynthos have some of the most dazzling unspoilt beaches in the country. You can island hop between the Ionian Islands quite easily from spring to autumn, with ferries from just £8 one way. The tiny island of Ithaka, a ferry from Kefalonia, is a tranquil beauty with stretches of unspoiled nature and bustling little harbors for an evening out.

The Peloponnese

The Peloponnese is one of Greece’s best kept secrets, with pretty little low towns with red roofs and golden sandy beaches, as well as secluded monasteries and spas to explore. Head down the coast from Kalamata Airport to explore tiny villages filled with bougainvillea and charming family-run tavernas.

The Saronics

The Saronic Islands, a small group of islands not far from Athens and the Peloponnese, are used to hosting hedonistic and off-the-beaten-path retreats for writers and artists. Leonard Cohen, writer Henry Miller and artist Nikos Hadjikyriakos-Ghikas were just three of the big names hiding in Hydra in its touristic early days – car-free to this day, this magical island is glorious for hiking and swimming in craggy coves, with a compact but glamorous culinary scene in the harbour. Neighboring Spetses is a popular film location, while Poros offers peaceful, low-key and affordable food and accommodation.

The best things to do

Eat drink and be happy

Much of those who travel to Greece each summer head there to relax, swim and eat, whether at the chic, rosy beach clubs of Mykonos or the peaceful coves of Paxos or Skopelos. And there’s no shame in doing this – most ports and villages only have a handful of tavernas and bars, so you can keep things lively by moving to a larger island (like Crete or Corfu) or by going to a few small ones.

To run away

Besides living the good life and stocking up on the Mediterranean diet rich in olive oil, this is a nation of sailors, and you should do your best to get out on the waves. Every major beach town offers boat trips, whether to caves along the coast or to smaller islands, and it’s easy to organize a day or an afternoon for a few tens of euros (many involve a picnic on the beach and/or a slug of ouzo).

ancient wonders

Greece’s ancient wonders also make it a honeypot of day trips: you can, for example, travel to Olympia in the Western Peloponnese to see statues of ancient heroes, learn about the originals and race on the age-old race track. In Crete, be sure to visit Knossos; head to Mycenae in the Peloponnese or several castles and palaces in Rhodes; or visit the ancient stadium at Delphi, two and a half hours north of Athens. Many of the quieter Greek islands are popular with hikers for their uninterrupted natural splendor. Head out in the spring to see wildflowers on your hilly expeditions to tiny churches or silent bays.

Move

Good train connections are sadly lacking at this lovely holiday spot, but most major stops would require you to catch a plane or ferry anyway. Many fly into Athens before catching a domestic flight or ferry to one of the islands – the latter is affordable, but some routes take you into four or even six-hour territory. On the mainland – if you were stopping in Athens but continuing on to the Peloponnese, for example – hiring a car is a good idea.

Unless you’re tacking on Athens, flying straight to one of the larger islands and then taking ferries is usually the best plan. However, the ferries only run from spring to autumn (approximately late March to early October, but this varies from route to route). If you’re flexible on time, local buses can take you between major towns on larger islands like Corfu, Crete and Kefalonia, but you’ll need to look carefully at times (and they may not show up). -be not always). The laid-back attitude to services and timetables in this sun-drenched nation has earned its way of life the nickname GMT: it’s “maybe Greek time.” On holiday islands such as Mykonos, you are at the mercy of a handful of taxi drivers.

How to get there

The cheapest

Flights to Athens are often the cheapest way, followed by budget airlines serving the major holiday islands (Rhodes, Crete, Corfu, Kos, Mykonos, etc.). From these points you can take ferries to smaller points.

The fastest

As the most northwestern holiday island, Corfu is slightly quicker to reach than Athens (around 3.10 hours for the 3.40 hour flight from Athens). And don’t overlook Preveza, the 3 hour 20 wonder from which you can access both the mainland and the islands.

The most durable

It is possible to travel to Greece from the UK entirely by train and boat. Your journey by train, starting with the Eurostar, runs roughly: Paris, Milan, Bari. Then from Bari you take the 4pm ferry to Patras, where the Peloponnese joins the mainland.

Tip to save money

Although it has dreamy luxury hotels, Greece excels in no-frills self-catering apartments. If you’re looking to travel on a shoestring, you can buy pristine, white-tiled, toweled rooms (some with receptions and even a pool) for as little as £40 a night, self-catering. Many have the best views of the bay, and a mini-market offering yogurts and peaches for breakfast is just steps away.

FAQs

What weather is it?

Much like the rest of the Mediterranean – in April and May, daily highs will be in the low 20s, making it ideal for an active spring break. Summer sees reliably sunny days with temperatures reaching the 30s, while you will have beautiful sunny days well into the mid 20s through October. Some islands – the Aegean in particular – experience brisk “meltemi” winds in July and August. As this is a large country, it is worth checking individual weather conditions – the southern and eastern islands can stay warmer for longer than the northern ones.

What time zone is it in?

Eastern European Time (EET), which is GMT+2.

What currency do I need?

euros.

What language is spoken?

Greek, although as a tourism-loving country, English is widely spoken.

Ikos Resorts expands its luxury offering with a second property on the island of Corfu

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Ikos Resorts is delighted to announce the sixth addition to its award-winning luxury all-inclusive portfolio, with the opening of Ikos Odisia in Corfu on May 19, 2023. The second Ikos to open on the Greek island, Ikos Odisia is in an emblematic place, protected in an isolated bay in front of Ikos Dassia, rewarded all over the world. The new Ikos Odisia is gracefully elevated for spectacular views and landscape panoramas of the Ionian Sea.

Beautifully designed by Nimand Architects, the new beachfront resort on beautiful Dassia Bay in Corfu is a 25-minute drive from Corfu International Airport and 20 km from the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Corfu. Corfu old town.

Surrounded by a fragrant forest, the serene resort has 395 sumptuous rooms, suites, bungalows and villas, each carefully designed for couples and families of all sizes. Sprinkled invitingly across 60 acres and blending seamlessly into the lush natural surroundings, Ikos Odisia will welcome guests to an elegant waterfront ambience, combining relaxed beach living with luxurious and chic interiors. The superb five-star property will welcome the outdoors, taking full advantage of the unspoiled nature that surrounds the resort. Those looking for the ultimate Ikos experience can opt for the exclusive Deluxe Collection suites, in an unparalleled area of ​​the resort with personalized pre-arrival planning via a personal concierge and a range of benefits.

Guests of the new Ikos Odisia can expect the group’s award-winning all-inclusive Infinite Lifestyle concept, bringing next-level relaxation to virtually every element of the holiday, with menus created by Michelin-starred chefs, spa experiences signed Anne Semonin Paris and 24-hour room service. Also included as part of their stay, guests can dine at select local restaurants, including a tempting option on Vidos Island, accessible only by private boat. The Local Drive adventure also allows guests to explore the stunning destination with a free one-day car rental, with free museum tickets encouraging guests to fully experience the destination.

Ikos Odisia will have five à la carte restaurants, with menus created by Michelin-starred chefs featuring flavors from Greece, Italy, Peru and Asia, as well as a Mediterranean buffet-style restaurant. Creative cocktails and a choice of 300 international and local wines will be served by Ikos’ expert sommeliers and mixologists at the hotel’s indoor and outdoor bars, which offer a venue for all occasions, from casual beach bars to elegant live music backdrops. Taking full advantage of the resort’s elevated location, Ikos Odisia’s exclusive new restaurant, The View Lounge, welcomes guests with incredible views of the Ionian Sea and will serve cocktails, light snacks and a full celebratory dinner menu. a fusion of Peruvian cuisine.

The resort will offer 10 heated outdoor and indoor swimming pools, including children’s and adult-only pools, as well as a 420m white-sand beach surrounded by fragrant pine, citrus and olive trees, and overlooking crystal-clear waters. Beach service serving food and drink and 30 minutes of free babysitting on the beach for children over four will also be offered.

Those wishing to stay active during their holiday can take advantage of the state-of-the-art fitness center or take advantage of the range of sports facilities and activities from tennis to canoeing, mountain biking or windsurfing. The Ikos Spa offers breathtaking views of the Ionian Sea, the perfect setting for a luxurious signature treatment, with beauty products from Anne Semonin Paris.

Parents can rest and relax safe in the knowledge that their little ones are expertly cared for with free kids’ clubs for kids and teens aged 4-17, featuring activities such as arts and crafts, sports, cooking and science. Those with babies and toddlers can also take advantage of the Heroes crèche and childcare services, with professional childcare available.

As with all Ikos properties, Ikos Odisia will help the local community to have a positive impact on the economy of Corfu Island and the destination as a whole, one of the most cosmopolitan and attractive destinations in Greece. The station will work with local suppliers and generate 700 new jobs, at least half of which will be filled by locals. Ikos Odisia will also establish sustainable hotel operations under the Ikos Green program, including being carbon neutral and implementing zero waste initiatives.

Departure of the COO of EasyJet before the high season

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The leader of the British low-cost airline EasyJet Peter Bellew announced on Friday that he would resign. Acting as interim CEO is David Morgan.

EasyJet was honored because of ongoing cancellations and disruptions caused by lack of staff. Morgan, who has worked for the airline since 2016, takes over in the middle of the summer season and will report directly to the general manager. John Lundgren.

In an announcement on Monday, the low-cost carrier said Bellew had decided “to pursue other business opportunities” and that the airline was “committed to a smooth transition.”

“Everyone at easyJet remains absolutely focused on delivering a safe and reliable operation this summer,” said Lundgren.

In recent weeks, EasyJet has been plagued by thousands of flight cancellations and passenger complaints. Like many airlines, the company laid off hundreds of staff during the Covid-19 pandemic in a bid to cut costs.

Aviation as a whole is currently suffering from a lack of staff.

Last month, the airline said cancellations over the summer period were likely. This week, he said he would announce no more cancellations.

According to the BBC, some 150,000 of the 160,000 EasyJet flights originally scheduled for July, August and September will take place. About 10,000 flights were canceled, or about 6% of the company’s flights.

To make matters worse, Spanish unions are planning a series of 24-hour strikes this month.

At the beginning of May, easyJet announced the addition of new routes to popular greek islands such as cos, Kefalonia, Corfu and Crete (Chania). The UK is one of Greece’s main source markets, with transport serving popular holiday destinations.

In the meantime, according to the British press, more cancellations are in the works after the government gave airlines until Friday to announce changes to their schedules without incurring penalties.


Follow GTP headlines on Google News to keep up to date with all the latest news on tourism and travel in Greece.

Ask for help! The tourism industry in Greece cannot find enough workers

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ATHENS – Tourists are back in Greece during the COVID-19 pandemic after health measures were eased to attract them, but the workers serving them are not, with jobs begging in industry .

With reports there are some 55,000 vacancies among cooks, chefs, waiters and cleaners and other helpers, tourism businesses cannot find people to fill positions due to low pay, poor conditions work and housing and former workers who avoid full-time seasonal jobs. work time.

It’s so bad that Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis has advised restaurants, bars, hotels, taverns and other tourism-dependent businesses trying to recover from two years of closures and slowdowns to pay them more.

In an article, POLITICO reported that Greece was struggling to find enough tourism workers, with the industry even asking the government to exempt teachers and pensioners from laws banning them from holding positions and offering jobs to Ukrainian refugees from the Russian invasion.

Tourism is Greece’s biggest revenue driver and contributes up to 18-20% of the annual gross domestic product (GDP) of 194.52 billion euros ($200.3 billion) and at its peak during the record years that ended in 2019 – COVID hit in 2020 – employed almost a million people.

In 2019 there were some 33 million visitors, three times the country’s population and they brought in more than 18 billion euros ($18.54 billion) and with signs showing they are spending big this year too , raising hope.

Tourism Minister Vassilis said 2019 “was cloudless, a trouble-free year”, with the specter of COVID on the horizon, the yet unknown deadly virus and Greece welcoming another bumper crop of visitors.

“This year we still have a pandemic, a war in the heart of Europe after 80 years, an energy crisis, inflation, high prices because of the war… But so far it seems that it will be a strong season,” he told the news site.

Jobs that young people would typically take are not taken even though Greece had the highest youth unemployment rate in Europe at 36.8% in April and the second highest total unemployment rate at 12.7% (after Spain), according to Eurostat, the European Union. statistics agency.

“The problem was already evident in 2019, when we saw a record number of arrivals, but this year it has deteriorated considerably,” said Grigoris Tasios, president of the Greek Federation of Hoteliers and owner of a hotel. in Halkidiki, northern Greece.

Two years of pandemic and lockdowns have meant that many foreigners working in the Greek tourism sector have left the country and never returned and with more Greeks looking for stable jobs, the tourism industry is less attractive .

“It’s a real problem for all European countries,” Kikilias said. “Due to the pandemic, a number of workers in the tourism sector, as hotels closed, sought work in other sectors to earn a living.”

The news site reported the case of a 45-year-old woman who did not want to give her full name and started working in tourism in 1999, the last years spent in a hotel in Kyllini, in the Peloponnese, but this summer she decided to quit.

“They basically forced me to quit because they asked me to work four hours in the morning and four hours in the afternoon, which means I would have to go 40 kilometers (24.85 miles) round trips ) twice a day,” she said.

SHOW THEM THE MONEY

With gasoline close to the equivalent of $10 a gallon, it was a losing proposition, especially given the low wages of workers, some of whom said they slept in their cars instead of unsuitable rooms offered to them.

“Now when students come in for their first job, they make them work 12-14 hours, they take their tips, they give them rotten food and make them work in miserable conditions, what incentive do they have to work? ” she says.

Speaking at the annual general meeting of the Greek Tourism Confederation (SETE), Mitsotakis said staff shortages in the industry were becoming “threatening” and called on employers to raise wages and improve conditions work, but it was apparently ignored.

Tourism “also requires investment in human resources, as it must be attractive not only to visitors but also to those working in the sector; which indicates better wages and working conditions,” Mitsotakis said.

SETE President Yiannis Retsos said: “First we want to separate the wheat from the chaff; the professional who pays taxes, who provides jobs and growth, to one who sees tourism as an easy way to get rich.

Giorgos Hotzoglou, president of the Panhellenic Federation of Employees in the Catering and Tourism Industry, said the situation will worsen during the summer season, as those who remain in the tourism sector are forced to work even harder. long due to labor shortages, according to the report. added.

“There is constant movement with departures, resignations and transfers from one company to another,” he said. “Some of those who started working in May have already quit. In the first 10 days of June, some 5,000 tourism and hospitality workers quit, in addition to the more than 50,000 who were already missing.

“It seems that hoteliers and tourism employers are not interested in quality but in quantity,” Hotzoglou said. “They don’t care if the cook knows how to cook, if the receptionist speaks foreign languages, if they have had any training.”

Tasios said the criticism was wrong and the problem is that young people no longer want to work in tourism.

“The majority of employees in the hotel industry offer well-paid jobs. Hoteliers are the only ones with a collective agreement,” he said.

The Ministry of Labor has approved a collective labor agreement for people working in the food industry, which sets fixed terms and conditions of employment and pay for some 400,000 employees in bars and restaurants.

Kikilias said most tourism businesses take good care of their workers, challenge reviews and pay them enough – contradicting Mitsotakis – and said they are monitored although tourists are cheated on islands like Mykonos .

“We respect and honor all those who do their job very well and we will set an example among the few who try to discredit the tourism product,” the minister said.

“I appeal to businessmen in the tourism sector,” Kikilias said. “Since tourism workers are our country’s ambassadors abroad, I ask them to provide quality, well-paying jobs. The surplus of tourism profits and the success of Greek tourism should be shared with all workers in the sector.

Indonesia Energy Begins Drilling of Second of Two Consecutive Production Wells on Kruh Block

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Indonesia Energy Corporation Limited

NOTuh pproduction aplanned to bRing IEC at vsash Fdown ppositive ohoperations

JAKARTA, INDONESIA AND DANVILLE, CA, July 5, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Indonesia Energy Corporation Limited (NYSE American: INDO) (IEC), an Indonesia-focused oil and gas exploration and production company, today announced that the company has commenced drilling operations on the second from its two consecutive producing wells. This well is called well K-28. The first of these two back-to-back wells, Well K-27 was completed as a discovery well in May 2022. The first well is named Well K-27). These wells are being drilled on the company’s 63,000-acre Kruh block located on the island of Sumatra.

Drilling at K-28 commenced on Wednesday, June 22, 2022. K-28 has a target total depth of 3,400 feet and is expected to take approximately 45 days to complete all drilling operations.

As an update to the drilling plan schedule for 2022, IEC plans to drill a third new well at Kruh Block, which is expected to begin drilling in September 2022, and likely a fourth new well sometime before the end of 2022. These wells are a continuation of the drilling campaign previously announced by IEC to complete a total of 18 new production wells in the Kruh Block by the end of 2024.

If drilling is successful, the K-28 well is expected to produce an average of more than 100 barrels of oil per day in the first year of production and will cost approximately $1.5 million to drill and complete. Based on the terms of IEC’s contract with the Indonesian government and an oil price of $90.00/barrel (approximately 20% below the most recent closing price for Brent), the well is expected to generate $2.4 million in net revenue in its first twelve months, which would be enough to recoup more than the cost of drilling the well in the first year of production.

The Kruh block is located on the island of Sumatra where IEC already produces oil from 5 existing wells.

Mr. Frank Ingriselli, President of IEC, said: “We are delighted to have begun drilling our second of two consecutive wells and to aggressively take advantage of the current high oil prices and to evolve our business towards a potentially positive cash flow position. this year, paving the way for new drilling and the growth of our business in 2022 and beyond. We believe Kruh Block is a world-class asset that should significantly increase our cash flow as we drill additional wells and seek to maximize returns on our investments and increase shareholder value. Additionally, our company is moving forward to aggressively prepare the ground to develop our Citarum Block of 1 billion barrels of natural gas, where the previous operator drilled some gas finds. »

About Indonesia Energy Corporation Limited

Indonesia Energy Corporation Limited (NYSE American: INDO) is a publicly traded energy company engaged in the acquisition and development of high-growth strategic energy projects in Indonesia. IEC’s principal assets are its Kruh block (63,000 acres) located onshore on the island of Sumatra in Indonesia and its Citarum block (1,000,000 acres) located onshore on the island of Java in Indonesia. IEC is headquartered in Jakarta, Indonesia, and has a representative office in Danville, California. For more information on the IEC, please visit www.indo-energie.com.

Caution Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

All statements contained in this press release by Indonesia Energy Corporation Limited (“IEC”) and its representatives and partners that are not based on historical fact are “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act. Act of 1995 and the provisions of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Acts”). In particular, when used in the preceding discussion, the words “estimates”, “believes”, “hopes”, “expects”, “intends”, “on track”, “plans “, “anticipates” or “may,” and similar conditional expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Laws and are subject to the safe harbor created by the Laws. All statements made in this press release other than statements of historical fact, regarding an action, event or development, are forward-looking statements. Although management has based the forward-looking statements contained herein on its current expectations, the information on which such expectations were based may change. These forward-looking statements are based on a number of assumptions about future events and are subject to a number of risks, uncertainties and other factors, many of which are beyond the control of the IEC, that could cause actual results to occur. (including, without limitation, future oil prices and anticipated results of IEC’s drilling and production activities and the impact of such activities on IEC’s results of operations as described in the herein) differ materially and adversely from those statements. These risks, uncertainties and other factors include, but are not limited to, those set forth in the Risk Factors section of the Company’s Annual Report on Form 20-F for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2021, filed May 2, 2022. , with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). Copies of these documents are available on the SEC’s website, www.sec.gov. IEC assumes no obligation to update these statements for revisions or changes after the date of this publication, except as required by law.

Company details:

Frank C. Ingriselli
Chairman, Indonesia Energy Corporation Limited
[email protected]

SAS airline says its survival is at stake as pilot strikes flights

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By Anna Ringstrom, Essi Lehto and Supantha Mukherjee

STOCKHOLM (Reuters) – Wage negotiations between Scandinavian airline SAS and its pilots collapsed on Monday, triggering a strike that puts the carrier’s future at risk and adds to the chaos of travel across Europe as the period of rush of summer vacation begins.

The action is the first major airline strike to hit as the industry seeks to capitalize on the first full rebound in leisure travel from the pandemic.

It follows months of acrimony between employees and management as the airline seeks to recover from the impact of the closures without incurring costs it says would make it unable to compete.

At the same time, employees across Europe are demanding pay rises as they battle soaring inflation.

A strike could cost SAS nearly 100 million Swedish krona ($10 million) a day, calculated Sydbank analyst Jacob Pedersen, and the company’s future ticket sales will suffer. SAS shares were down 4.7% at 1511 GMT.

“A strike at this stage is devastating for SAS and puts the future of the company and the jobs of thousands of colleagues at risk,” SAS chief executive Anko van der Werff said in a statement.

“The decision to strike now demonstrates reckless behavior on the part of the pilot unions and a shockingly weak understanding of the plight in which SAS finds itself.”

Sydbank’s Pedersen said the strike could wipe out up to half of the airline’s cash flow of more than 8 billion crowns in the first four to five weeks in a worst-case scenario alone, and could only leave “deep wounds” among the travelers concerned. .

“SAS has too much debt and too high costs, and is therefore not competitive. SAS is in other words a company that is flying towards bankruptcy,” he said in a research note.

BLAMER COMMERCIAL

Union leaders blamed SAS.

“We finally realized SAS didn’t want a deal,” SAS Pilot Group Chairman Martin Lindgren told reporters. “SAS wants a strike.”

Lindgren said the pilots were ready to resume talks, but called on SAS to change their position.

Unions have said nearly 1,000 pilots in Denmark, Sweden and Norway will join the strike, which is one of the biggest airline strikes since British Airways pilots in 2019 grounded most flights carrier in a compensation dispute.

Further disruption looms as British Airways staff at London’s Heathrow Airport in June voted in favor of a pay strike.

In addition, Spanish Ryanair and easyJet cabin crew plan to strike this month to demand better working conditions and workers at Paris Charles de Gaulle airport stopped work this weekend to demand a salary increase.

Sofia Skedung, 38, arrived at Arlanda Airport in Stockholm to find that the SAS flight on which she and her family had booked a charter trip had been cancelled.

“I was going to go with my family to Corfu on vacation for a week, which we were looking forward to since we haven’t traveled for a very long time,” she said as she searched in vain for staff at the SAS in the departure hall.

“It’s all very, very confusing here,” she added.

BUSIEST WEEK

Loss-making SAS is seeking to restructure its business by dramatically cutting costs, raising cash and converting debt into equity.

“It’s about finding investors. How on earth does a strike in the busiest week in 2.5 years help find and attract investors?” van der Werff told reporters.

The airline, which is partly owned by the Swedish and Danish governments, estimated that the strike would lead to the cancellation of around 50% of SAS’s scheduled flights and affect around 30,000 passengers a day, around half of its daily load. .

Denmark said it was ready to provide more cash and write off debt on the condition that the airline also bring in private investors, while Sweden refused to inject more money.

Norway sold its stake in 2018 but holds debt in the airline and has said it may be willing to convert it into equity.

Danish Finance Minister Nicolai Wammen, in an emailed comment to Reuters, said he hoped the parties would reach a solution as soon as possible.

The collective agreement between the airline and the SAS Pilot Group union expired on April 1. Months of negotiations, which began last November, have failed to reach a new agreement.

Pilots have been angered by SAS’ decision to hire pilots through two new subsidiaries – Connect and Link – instead of first rehiring former employees made redundant during the pandemic, when almost half of its pilots lost their jobs.

A strike would include all pilots at parent company SAS Scandinavia, but not Link and Connect, a union that organizes the 260 pilots attached to the two units. It would also not affect SAS’s external partners Xfly, Cityjet and Airbaltic, the company said.

SAS had already canceled many flights before the summer, part of a wider trend in Europe, where, in addition to the upheaval from strikes, operators responded to staff shortages created by slow rehiring after the pandemic. .

($1 = 10.3436 Swedish crowns)

(Additional reporting by Stine Jacobsen in Copenhagen and Alex Cornwall in Dubai; Writing by Niklas Pollard; Editing by Barbara Lewis and Emelia Sithole-Matarise)

Without fuel or money, Sri Lanka keeps schools closed

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Colombia, Sri Lanka — Cash-strapped Sri Lanka extended school closures for a week on Sunday because there is not enough fuel for teachers and parents to get children into classrooms , and the energy minister called on the country’s expats to send money home through banks to finance new oil purchases.

Huge external debt has left the Indian Ocean island without any suppliers willing to sell fuel on credit. Available stocks, sufficient for just a few days, will be provided to essential services, including health and port workers, public transport and food distribution, officials said.

“Finding money is a challenge. It’s a huge challenge,” Energy and Energy Minister Kanchana Wijesekera told reporters.

He said the government had ordered new stocks of fuel and the first ship with 40,000 metric tons of diesel was expected to arrive on Friday while the first ship carrying gasoline would arrive on July 22.

Several other fuel shipments are underway. But he said authorities were struggling to come up with $587 million to pay for the fuel. Wijesekera said Sri Lanka owed about $800 million to seven fuel suppliers.

Last month, schools across the country were closed for a day due to fuel shortages and have remained closed for the past two weeks in urban areas. Schools will remain closed until Friday.

Authorities have also announced nationwide power cuts of up to three hours a day from Monday as they cannot supply enough fuel to power stations. Drastic power cuts have plagued Sri Lanka’s economy for months, along with severe shortages of essentials including cooking gas, medicine and food imports.

Wijesekera said the main problem is the lack of dollars and called on some 2 million Sri Lankans working abroad to send their foreign exchange earnings through banks rather than informal channels.

He said workers’ remittances, which typically amounted to $600 million a month, fell to $318 million in June.

According to the Central Bank, remittances – the country’s main source of foreign exchange – fell from $2.8 billion in the first six months of 2021 to $1.3 billion in the same period this year. , a decrease of 53%.

The drop came after the government last year ordered mandatory foreign currency conversion. He said black market bounties led people to hoard foreign currency.

Sri Lanka got most of its fuel needs from neighboring India, which provided it with a line of credit. The government said it was also negotiating with suppliers in Russia and Malaysia.

Sri Lanka has suspended repayment of around $7 billion in foreign loans due this year out of the $25 billion to be repaid by 2026. The country’s total external debt is $51 billion.

The economic collapse sparked a political crisis with widespread anti-government protests erupting across the country. Protesters blocked major roads to demand petrol and fuel, and TV stations showed residents in some areas fighting over limited supplies.

In the capital, Colombo, demonstrators have occupied the entrance to the president’s office for more than two months to demand the resignation of President Gotabaya Rajapaksa. They accuse him and his powerful family which included several siblings in high-level government positions of plunging the country into crisis through corruption and mismanagement.

Sunday July 3, 2022 – La Minute Monocle

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Sunday Roast / Molly Molloy

Free time

After 10 years with luxury Italian fashion brand Marni, Molly Molloy co-founded maximalist homeware and clothing brand Colville in 2018. Her designs are eclectic and full of character, but value individuality and longevity. rather than novelty. Here, Milan-based Molloy shares her weekend plans in Venice, her favorite bakery and what her partner loves for breakfast.

Where will we meet you this weekend?
I’ll be on my friend’s boat on the Venice Lagoon, hopping up and down for lunch and swimming.

Ideal to start on a Sunday? Soft or jerk?
Always sweet. I like to relax during the day.

What’s for breakfast?
Most Sundays it’s scrambled eggs and HP sauce on toast. My Italian boyfriend loves it.

Lunch inside or outside?
Lunch at the Pasticceria Sissi in Milan. It’s just around the corner from my apartment and everything is divine. To finish, I often receive a croissant filled with pastry cream.

An exercise ?
I’m still trying to adapt to swimming – and steaming.

A Sunday soundtrack?
“Something on Your Mind” by Karen Dalton.

Essential Sunday?
There is a big flea market every last Sunday of the month in the Navigli district of Milan. It’s rare that I go home empty-handed.

News or not?
Yes, this is the day I have to read a whole article, not just the first paragraph.

A glass of something?
If there’s a good primitivo open, I’ll definitely have a drink.

What is on the menu?
Right now it’s my boyfriend’s summer pasta with finely chopped raw onions, capers, olives, datterini tomatoes and mozzarella. It’s delicious and the perfect way to end a Sunday.

Sunday night routine?
I really try to relax on Sunday nights, so I read or watch a movie and walk the dog.

Are you preparing Monday’s outfit?
I never prepare the night before. If I do, I’ll have changed my mind by morning. I will follow the current Monday morning.

The staggering cost to the Treasury of generous public sector pensions

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SIR – Retired headteacher Eve Wilson (Letters, 26 June) generously clarifies that she does not need the huge pension increase that will be given to most if not all of the service’s retirees public on the occasion of the next review. I don’t blame her for the windfall – she’s just trying to keep pace with inflation. However, the comparison with less protected retirees is alarming.

I’m lucky enough to get a retirement pension, but at best I can expect half of it to cover inflation up to a maximum of 5%; the other half receive no raise, as my employer was unable to afford the cost of maintaining a discretionary raise of up to 3% per year on pre-1997 service.

I served 20 years as a trustee of my employer’s pension plan and know only too well the exorbitant cost of purchasing annuities to fund even minimal annual increases. It appears that civil service pensions have no incremental caps, which no private sector employee can even dream of.

Civil servants enjoy virtually full job protection during their working life and also do not have to worry financially in retirement. In my experience, those fortunate recipients of taxpayers’ largesse – be they teachers, local authority employees or servants of the Crown – have little awareness of the generosity of their terms of employment.

The cost to the treasury is huge and should certainly be a prime candidate for a ‘race up’ review – though ‘race down’ might be more sensible.

Alain Quinton
Eastbourne, East Sussex

SIR – Good to hear that public sector pensioners are to receive an extra £2,000 (Letters, 26 June).

I’m on a company defined benefit pension plan, but 50 percent of my pension is subject to increase at the discretion of the company. We haven’t had a penny increase in this portion since 2014. Earlier this year the remainder of my pension gave me a 1.3% increase, or less than £20 a month. Different planet.

Keith Appleyard
West Wickham, Kent

SIR – Eve Wilson says she realizes some pensioners may struggle, but the increase promised by the government is not justified as many more pensioners are wealthy.

However, the triple block on state pensions was removed in the last budget, when the Chancellor broke a Tory manifesto promise to keep it, plunging many pensioners into real poverty.

In fact, according to a recent report by the Center for Aging Better, there are now over two million pensioners living in poverty in the UK. This is a shameful figure for one of the richest economies in the world. Add to this the huge increases in the cost of living, especially for food and energy, and it is clear that many, probably most, of those two million people will be at risk of hypothermia or malnutrition this winter.

I live in Merseyside, in an area of ​​Red Wall, where voters who usually vote Labor switched to the Conservatives because they wanted Brexit done. These voters trusted the party manifesto and expected to receive an increase in their pensions this year. They were severely disappointed by those to whom they gave their support. As a result of this betrayal, they will lose at least £10 every week (report, June 25).

In this area, many retirees live in real poverty, food banks are overwhelmed with new claimants, many of them elderly, and a deteriorating housing stock adds to the burden of rising fuel prices. energy.

Dr. Elisabeth Stewart
Southport, Lancashire

The Conservative plotters

SIR – The Prime Minister has become the object of daily attacks on both his character and his ability to lead this country through its current difficulties.

Much of that is deserved, no doubt, though one should marvel at his ability to carry on with apparent good humor.

Nevertheless, I am terrified of what might happen if the plotters succeed in overthrowing their current leader. Conservative leadership elections have a history of rewarding mediocre candidates, as happened in 1990 and 2016, opening the door to an opportunistic coalition between Labour, the Liberal Democrats and the Scottish National Party in the next few years. general elections.

peter hancock
Corsham, Wiltshire

SIR – From the warm shores of the Mediterranean, where I am in conversation with local businessmen, I find they are intrigued by how a progressive and well-educated nation like Britain can continue to support a Prime minister who is deceitful, immoral and cannot be considered trustworthy enough to honor any form of agreement.

They say they would be very reluctant to enter into trade agreements with this government.

David Yates
Corfu, Greece

Abortion rights in the United States

SIR – Usually demure Zoe Strimpel misses the mark with her hostile reaction to the U.S. Supreme Court’s overturning of the Roe v Wade case (“America is heading for another civil war where one side must overcome the other”, Commentary, June 26).

It is perfectly appropriate to criticize the legal reasoning and the decision in Dobbs, perhaps concluding that they are errors made by a court. But Ms Strimpel instead criticizes the decision as if it were the product of a legislature or constitutional convention.

The ultimate issue before the court in Roe and Dobbs was not the normative question of whether or not American women should have legal access to abortion. Instead, the question was a question of fact, namely: Does the US Constitution protect the right to abortion? Roe found that to be the case; Dobbs found not.

Even if the majority of Dobbs justices are wrong, so are the many experts who judge the court by how well or how poorly it achieves particular political results rather than how well it interprets and applies the law of the Constitution well or badly. .

Not everything desirable is protected by the Constitution, and not everything undesirable is prohibited by it.

Donald J. Boudreaux
Professor of Economics, George Mason University
Fairfax, Virginia, USA

Pride of Britons who worked to abolish slavery

During the Israel-Greece Conference – GuruFocus.com

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STOCKHOLM, June 2, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — AGII THEODORI, GREECEJune 22022 – Yesterday, Inna BravermanFounder and CEO of Eco Wave Power Global AB (publ), a leader in generating clean electricity from ocean and sea waves (Nasdaq: WAVE) (Nasdaq First North: ECOWVE) (“Eco Wave Power” or the “Company”), showcased Eco Wave Power’s innovative technology to an international collection of distinguished business leaders, senior government officials and investors at the annual Israel-Greece Conference, hosted by Calcalist at the Isla Brown Corinthia Hotel in Agii Theodori, Greece.

Inna BravermanFounder and CEO of Eco Wave Power, Orit Farhash – Hacohen, minister of israel innovation, science and technology and Angelos FragakisMayor of Halki Island

Ms. Braverman spoke at a session titled “Innovation for Good: Coping with Global Solutions through Technology Solutions” and detailed the benefits of wave energy. She also presented the company’s new project on the island of Halki in Greece.

She said “Eco Wave Power technology is smart, simple and easy to implement. The only part of the system that is in the water are the floats, which belong to the water, and all the expensive conversion equipment of energy are located on land like an ordinary power plant Wave energy is predicted to supply about 10% of all Europe electricity by 2050.”

She added that “Our go-to-market plan includes our upcoming project in Israel, which is co-funded by the Israeli Ministry of Energy, which has recognized Eco Wave Power technology as a pioneering technology, and EDF Renewables IL. We are also planning our first US project at the AltaSea premises in the port of Los Angelesto be followed by commercial-scale projects in Spain, Portugal and other locations in the company’s 327.7 megawatt project pipeline. I am also here to introduce you to our new project in Greece, in the island of Halki. Basically, the island wants to be 100% green and renewable, and it recently received recognition as the sustainability initiative of the year for its admirable efforts. The island plans to combine 1 megawatt of solar power, 1 megawatt of wind power and 1 megawatt of wave power and the European New Energy Solutions Optimized for Island (NESOI) program is funding the Eco Wave feasibility study Power in the Island which we expect to complete by the end of this year which will enable the construction of the first ever 1 megawatt grid-connected wave energy network in Greece.”

After the presentation, Ms. Braverman also met with Israel’s Minister of Innovation, Science and Technology- Orit Farkash-Hacohenand invited her for the official launch of the first wave energy project which will soon be connected to the grid at Israel.

Also present at the Israel-Greece conference was the Mayor Angelos Fragakis from Halki. The Greek island of Halki soon became known as Greece “Green Island” – the first of several islands to be transformed by the Greek government under the “GR-Eco” project, which provides the islands with renewable energy sources, making them independent of the national grid.

Halki Island currently has a solar power plant and electric vehicles, and Mayor Fragakis is looking to add wave power to the island’s growing collection of sustainable initiatives.

“Halki Island is constantly looking for new energy solutions,” said Mayor Fragakis. “Eco Wave Power’s use of wave technology is a great example of why ‘GR-Eco’ was formed: to foster new technology that can help every island in Greece be self-reliant and help do our part in the global fight against climate change.”

Please see a link to Ms. Braverman’s full presentation in the following link (not part of this press release): https://m.calcalist.co.il/Article.aspx?guid=rkjdsbhu5

“The Calcalist Israel-Greece conference was an incredible experience and a wonderful opportunity to share with leaders from Israel and Greece the innovative opportunities available right here on our shores,” Ms. Braverman continued. “Being surrounded by thought leaders and innovative professionals who are constantly pushing the boundaries of what’s possible was inspiring, and after everything I heard during the conference, I’m excited about the future of energy, the future of this part of the world and the future of our whole planet.”

About Eco Wave Power Global AB (publ)

Eco Wave Power is a leading onshore wave energy technology company that has developed patented, smart and cost-effective technology to turn ocean and sea waves into green electricity. Eco Wave Power’s mission is to help fight climate change by enabling commercial power generation from the ocean and waves.

Eco Wave Power is recognized as a “pioneering technology” by the Israeli Ministry of Energy and has been labeled as an “effective solution” by the Solar Impulse Foundation. Eco Wave Power has received funding from the European Union Regional Development Fund, Innovate UK and the European Commission’s Horizon 2020 framework programme. The Company also received the “Global Climate Action Award” from the United Nations.

Eco Wave Power’s (ECOWVE) common stock trades on the Nasdaq First North and its ADS (WAVE) trades on the Nasdaq Capital Market. More info: www.ecowavepower.com

Vator Securities is the company’s Certified Advisor (+46 8 580 065 99, [email protected]).

Information on or accessible through the websites mentioned above does not form part of this press release.

For more information please contact:

Inna Braverman, [email protected]
+97235094017

Investor contacts:

Matt CheslerCFA
FNK IR
+1.646.809.2183
[email protected]

Media inquiries:
Jacob ScottVectis Strategies
+1.412.445.7719
[email protected]

Forward-looking statements

This press release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the “safe harbor” provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 and other federal securities laws. Words such as “expects”, “anticipates”, “intends”, “plans”, “believes”, “seeks”, “estimates” and similar expressions or variations of these words are intended identify forward-looking statements. For instance, Eco Wave uses forward-looking statements when discussing expectations that wave energy is expected to supply approximately 10% of all Europe electricity by 2050 and its future projects in Israel, United States and Greece. These forward-looking statements and their implications are based on the current expectations of the management of Eco Wave and are subject to a number of factors and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those described in the forward-looking statements. Unless otherwise provided by law, Eco Wave assumes no obligation to publicly release any revisions to these forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances after the date hereof or to reflect the occurrence of unforeseen events. More detailed information on the risks and uncertainties affecting Eco Wave is contained under the heading “Risk Factors” in Eco Wave Power’s Annual Report on Form 20-F for the year ended December 31, 2021 filed with the SEC, which is available at the SEC’s website, www.sec.gov.

This information was brought to you by Cision http://news.cision.com

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The best islands in Greece to visit this European summer

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In case you haven’t noticed yet, we’ve reverted to the European trend of summer travel here in Australia and although some of us are sitting at home feeling very jealous, there’s probably some of you who are considering taking advantage of the opportunity to go abroad again. As recent travel trends have highlighted, Europe is on the brains of many travelers and data shared by travel comparison site GoSee indicates that Greece (and its many islands) is one of the most popular places right now.

According to the site, bookings in Greece have increased by 89% (with Italy at 83%), and Google search terms support this suggestion, with ‘best islands in Greece’ increasing search interest by 850% at the time of writing. .

In short, many of you really want to know which Greek islands to visit during the European summer months. So we consulted Visit Greece for expert insight. Here’s what we found.

5 of the best islands to visit in Greece

According to the Visit Greece website, there are around 6,000 islands and islets in the Greek seas. Only 227 islands are inhabited, but that’s still quite a long list of options when visiting.

Now, most tourists visiting Greece are familiar with destinations like Mykonos and Santorini. And while they’re both great places to visit, we’re not going to include them in our list – because why suggest places you already know?

Here we’ll explore five of the best lesser-known Greek islands to visit, as recommended by the tourist board.

Skopelos

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Skopelos is an island known for being the filming location of Mama Mia! If you’ve watched the movie, you’ll know it’s absolutely stunning. But more than that, Visit Greece points out that it has a truly impressive food scene (try the strifti cheese pie), as well as stunning pine-lined beaches.

Corfu

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If you like history in academia, Corfu is definitely the place for you. Home to the first Greek university (the Ionian Academy), the first philharmonic orchestra and the first school of fine arts, this island is full of opportunities to learn.

Here, you’ll find the UNESCO World Heritage Site, Corfu Old Town, as well as clear seas and a bustling foodie scene. Visit Greece writes:

“Let Corfu charm you with its historical monuments, rich multicultural heritage and stunning natural scenery.”

Samos

The best islands of Samos island in Greece
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For those looking for a dose of Greek mythology, Samos is known as the birthplace of Hera (wife of Zeus).

Visit Greece writes that it is also “the island of the father of mathematics, Pythagoras, of the astronomer Aristarchus and of the philosopher Epicurus”. Some big names there.

When you visit, you can expect spectacular views, a rich cultural scene, and plenty of opportunities to taste local wines.

“Whether in towering mountains, such as Mount Kerkis and Mount Ambelos – with alpine winter temperatures and endless rain – or in caves and canyons, the environment of Samos is reminiscent of the Greek hinterland in miniature.”

Zakynthos (aka Zante)

The best islands of the island of Zante in Greece
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Zante is dubbed “the flower of the Orient” by Visit Greece and is known as a region of particularly beautiful beaches. It is also home to the caretta aretta sea turtle and the monachus monachus seal.

In a nutshell, however, this is how Zante is described:

“You could say that Zante is synonymous with great beaches, vibrant nightlife, beautiful scenery and an ideal destination for water sports. What more could you ask for during the holidays? »

Rhodes

Opa!  5 Greek Islands to Visit (Other Than Mykonos and Santorini)
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This Greek island is best known for its medieval town, Rhodes Town, its wine and its beautiful countryside. It is also one of the largest islands you can visit.

If you like historical art, you can also find the famous statue of the Colossus of Rhodes here.

Milo

The best islands of Milos island in Greece
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Water babies will love Milos. Here you can find hot springs and underwater caves ready for divers to explore. The beaches are also known for their striking rock formations if you want some solid photography opportunities.

Visit Greece says of this island:

“Don’t forget to visit Apollonia, at the northwestern tip of the island. Hire a boat from its quaint little harbor and explore the shores and neighboring island of Kimolos!”


Feeling inspired to book a tour to Greece with this list of the best islands to visit so far? We certainly are. I guess we’ll watch Mama Mia! repeatedly for the next few months.

Tornos news | European Heritage Award for the restoration of a Roman monument on the Greek island of Sikinos

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The Episkopi monument, a Roman mausoleum converted into a Byzantine church on the Greek island of Sikinos, was among the winners of the 2022 European Heritage Awards, announced on Thursday by the European Commission and Europa Nostra, ANA reports.

The awards were given to 30 winners from 18 countries in 5 categories and will be celebrated at the European Heritage Awards ceremony in Prague on September 26. The Sikinos monument has been recognized in the category “Conservation and adaptive reuse”.

The Episkopi monument was built in the 3rd century AD and later converted into a Byzantine church and in permanent use. The ancient monument was added in the Middle Ages and modern times, with all additions preserved almost intact. The restoration project “combined meticulous research with careful conservation, resulting in a high-quality restoration project,” the award citation said.

After surviving destructive earthquakes and interventions, the monument was abandoned in the 20th century. The Ephoria of Antiquities of the Cycladic Islands of Greece decided to restore it in 2016 and return it for public use. Private and regional EU funds provided the support, while the restoration revealed valuable inscriptions and frescoes from the Roman and Byzantine eras. It also revealed the hermetically sealed and undamaged grave of a higher-status woman named “Neiko”.

RELATED TOPICS: Greece, Greek tourism news, Tourism in Greece, The Greek Islands, Hotels in Greece, Trip to Greece, Greek destinations, Greek travel market, Greek tourism statistics, Greek tourism report

Image source: Wikimedia Commons License: CC-BY-SA Copyright: C. Charnock

US Navy Archives – Page 731 of 731

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Iran threatens to exploit the Strait of Hormuz, oil markets react, global economies take notice, and more naval forces are sent to the region, raising the stakes for Tehran and the US Navy.

Late last year, the commander-in-chief of Iran’s navy, Admiral Habibollah Sayyari, warned that closing the strait would be “easier than drinking a glass of water”. The Obama administration has publicly dismissed the threat as “saber-braking,” but has also privately advised Tehran that attempting to close the strait would trigger a US military response.

“The laying of mines in international waters is an act of war,” Vice Admiral Mark Fox, commander of the US Navy’s Fifth Fleet, said in a Feb. 12 interview.
“We, under the direction of the national leadership, would prevent this from happening. We always have the right and the obligation of self-defense and that is self-defense. If we did nothing and allowed some mining, it would be a long and difficult process to clean them up.

Whether it is an act of war or not (international rules – certainly more honored in their violation than observation – authorize the exploitation in peacetime of the high seas under certain strict conditions), the Iranian officials have threatened to close the Strait of Hormuz in response to Western sanctions over its nuclear program.

US Navy photo of the USS Enterprise and USS Cape St. George passing through the Strait of Hormuz on May 11.

But the ultimate impact of such an escalation – if only in rhetoric – is unclear. According to a Jan. 23 report by the Congressional Research Service “…as in the past, the prospect of a major disruption to maritime traffic in the strait risks damaging Iranian interests. US and allied military capabilities in the region remain formidable. This makes an outright and prolonged closure of the strait unlikely. Nonetheless, such threats may heighten tensions in global energy markets and force the United States and other global oil consumers to consider the risks of another potential conflict in the Middle East.


A key transportation route for a daily flow of 17 million barrels of oil – around 35% of the world’s oil trade by sea – according to the US Energy Information Administration, the Strait of Hormuz is around 175 miles long nautical miles and narrows to 21 nautical miles. miles wide, making it an “international strait” under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. These international straits, which are completely surrounded by the 12-mile territorial seas of the coastal states, enjoy protective under the UNCLOS regime, even though the United States has not yet ratified the treaty.

Since the end of World War II, mines have severely damaged or sunk four times as many US Navy ships as all other means of attack combined. Fifteen of the 19 ships fell victim to mines. And that doesn’t include many more sunken or mine-damaged ships, from the Corfu Channel crisis of 1946 to the Persian Gulf tanker wars of the 1980s to the sinking of the MV’s Tamil Sea Tigers. Invincible In 2008.

During the Tanker War in the Persian Gulf, Iraq and Iran indiscriminately deployed several types of mines, including variants of the 1908 Russian-designed contact mine that nearly sank the USS frigate. Samuel B. Roberts (FFG-58) in April 1988. After the United States agreed to provide protection for the tanker convoys, the first convoy ran into trouble when the American-flagged supertanker MV Bridgeton struck a mine which gouged a large hole in her hull. Almost immediately, US Navy surface warships lined up astern Bridgeton, belying the adage that every ship can be a minesweeper once. If more mines were present, Bridgeton was to clear the way.

In 1990 and 1991, Iraq deployed more than 1,300 mines in the northern Gulf, including a weapon never before seen in the West. In the early morning of February 18, 1991, the USS Tripoli (LPH-10), carrying airborne mine countermeasures helicopters, struck an Iraqi contact mine; four hours later, the cruiser Aegis Princeton (CG-59) fell victim to a Manta mine, a “mission-kill” that took the cruiser out of the war and cost around $100 million to bring it back online. More at the point of the impact of a possible Iranian mining campaign in 2012, it took multinational Coalition forces more than two years of intensive mine countermeasures operations to declare the northern Gulf mine-free.

According to then-Chief of Naval Operations, Admiral Gary Roughead, in 2009 more than one million mines of 300 types were in the inventories of more than 65 navies. Russia had about 250,000 mines. The Chinese Navy is estimated to have around 100,000 mines, including a rising mine that could be deployed in waters deeper than 6,000 feet. And North Korea had about 50,000 mines. All three sell weapons to virtually any navy or terrorist group, anywhere, anytime, as do about 17 other countries.

Iran has acquired a stockpile of 3,000 to 6,000 mines, mostly of Soviet/Russian, Chinese or North Korean origin. Most are unsophisticated but still dangerous floating contact mines, such as those that damaged Robert and Tripoli. Other mines, like the Manta that hit Princeton, are bottom mines that come to rest on the bottom and wait for a target to satisfy various parameters. These influence mines are triggered when increasingly sophisticated target detection devices detect the magnetic, acoustic, seismic, water pressure, and electrical potential signatures of their victims.

An Iranian mine, the Chinese-made EM-52, is a multiple-influence (acoustic, magnetic, pressure) rocket-propelled mine armed with a 600-pound high-explosive warhead, which can be deployed by naval vessels. surface in waters as deep as 600 feet.

The inventory is also believed to include around 600 advanced multi-influence mines purchased from Russia, including MDM-3 which can be dropped from aircraft.

Mines can be emplaced by virtually any underwater, surface, and airborne platform. To effectively mine the entire Strait of Hormuz would require thousands of mines and several weeks or more. Iran could use Kilo-class submarines, which can carry 24 mines. But a larger operation should also involve small craft and possibly commercial vessels. A 2010 report by the Near East and Gulf Institute for Military Analysis shows these Iranian capabilities of the minelaying platform:

Physics will help delineate the problem. Generally, the water depth of the strait ranges from around 200 feet to 300 feet, but its northwest approaches are shallower, around 120 feet deep. In the strait itself, depths can reach 1,000 feet and currents make the deployment of bottom mines an uncertain tactic. If deployed in deep water, even large warhead bottom mines would have a limited effect on surface traffic.

Libya’s Red Sea mining in the summer of 1984, for example, used multi-influence bottom mines exported by East Germany, totally unknown to the West. Ships that detonated mines in deeper water suffered significantly less damage than those in shallower water. (A total of 23 ships reported being mine victims, although four were later assessed as insurance scams.)

Not that bottom mines wouldn’t be employed where it makes operational sense, but Iran would likely rely on bottom-moored contact mines that hide near the surface but remain difficult to detect and defeat. .

Mines are just one element of Iran’s anti-access/area denial weapons, which include speedboats armed with guns and missiles, small and mini submarines armed with torpedoes, anti-ship missiles based on land and planes.

In response to Iran’s mines rattle, the Navy is deploying four additional Avenger-class MCM ships to the region, for a total of eight Avengers, along with two more MH-53E airborne MCM helicopters added to the two already in theater. The additional units will be based in Bahrain, home to the navy’s Fifth Fleet. “I came to the conclusion that we could do better to prepare the theater,” said Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert to the Senate Armed Services Committee during a Navy budget hearing earlier this year. “I wanted to be sure…that we are ready, that our people are competent, that they are confident and that they are good at what they do when needed.”

The Navy also announced that the USS Mackerel (LPD-15) is being refitted to support naval forces in the region, primarily focused on the MCM mission. A provisional Advanced Intermediate Afloat Base (AFSB), its “main battery” will consist of AMCM helicopters and support craft. This too has been done before, with the mid-1990s conversion of USS Inchon (LPH/MCS-12) as the MCM command and control vessel.

In addition, the naval MCM “order of battle” includes several Royal Navy MCM ships and Royal Australian Navy assets, as well as MCM capabilities from regional US maritime partners.

“It’s a volume issue more than a technical challenge,” Navy Lt. Cmdr. Wayne Liebold, captain of the USS Gladiator (MCM-11), one of the Avenger MCM ships based in Bahrain, said The Huffington Post. “My concern is going out there and having to search for a large volume of water with large amounts of mines,” said Liebold, who has completed three MCM deployments to the gulf.

Although easily detectable, the laying of several hundred mines in a few days could have a significant, albeit temporary, effect on commercial and naval mobility. More generally, however, the impact on global oil markets is unclear. During the Red Sea and Gulf of Suez mining crisis of 1984, commercial and naval traffic continued unabated, despite reports of underwater explosions, and world oil prices virtually stagnated. not been affected.

“Conventional wisdom might suggest that the outbreak of hostilities in the Strait of Hormuz or the Persian Gulf would significantly halt or discourage the flow of maritime traffic through the strait,” said Cmdr. Rodney A. Mills wrote in a 2008 Naval War College study, “But the ‘tanker wars’ between Iran and Iraq in the 1980s show a different behavior of the shipping industry. During the eight years of conflict, 544 attacks were carried out against all ships in the Gulf, leaving more than 400 civilians killed and 400 others injured. However, after an initial drop of 25%, the shipping industry adjusted to the risk and trade flow picked up. Despite the threat, oil and other maritime commerce continued to flow even as the conflict escalated until 1987, when a total of 179 attacks were carried out, roughly one attack every two days.

In short, while Iranian mines may not be obstacles, they certainly can be speed bumps that attack strategies, plans, and timelines, in addition to ships and submarines.

Former Ukrainian fixer of Giuliani gets 20 months in prison

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Lev Parnas, an associate of Rudy Giuliani who was a figure in former President Donald Trump’s first impeachment inquiry, was sentenced to a year and eight months in prison on Wednesday for fraud and campaign finance crimes by a judge. who said fraud had become “a way of life” for Parnas.

Parnas50, had asked for clemency on the grounds that he had cooperated with Congress’s investigation of Trump and his efforts to get Ukrainian leaders to investigate President Joe Biden’s son.

U.S. District Judge J. Paul Oetken did not credit Parnas for the assistance, which only came after the Soviet-born businessman faced criminal charges. But the judge still imposed a lighter sentence than the six years required by prosecutors.

The judge also ordered Parnas to pay $2.3 million in restitution.

Parnas’ various schemes to obtain money that prosecutors say fueled a lavish lifestyle led Oetken to say that for Parnas, fraud “was essentially a way of life, a way of doing business. “.

Addressing the court before the sentencing was announced, Parnas sobbed and apologized to those who had lost money investing in his businesses.

“Much of what you have heard is true, your honor. I haven’t been a good person all my life. I made mistakes. And I admit it,” Parnas said. “I want to apologize to all the victims I’ve hurt. They’re all people who are my friends, all people who trusted me, and I lied to them to further my personal agenda.

The criminal case against Parnas was not directly related to his work as a repairman for Giulani as the former New York mayor pressured Ukrainian officials to launch an investigation into Biden’s son, Hunter.

Instead, he focused on the donations Parnas had illegally made to a number of American politicians using the wealth of a wealthy Russian to start a legal recreational marijuana business.

In March, Parnas too pleaded guilty to a wire fraud conspiracy, admitting that he and a partner gave investors false information about a Florida-based company, Fraud Guarantee, which promised to protect people from fraud.

This new company hired Giuliani as a consultant at a time when some Ukrainian figures were trying to curry favor with the Trump administration, agreeing to pay him $500,000.

Charles Gucciardo, a Long Island attorney who provided the money to pay Giuliani, told the judge during the sentencing hearing that he hoped the former Manhattan federal prosecutor would return the money because Fraud Guarantee turned out to be a fraud.

“I bet he’s going to give me that money back,” he said, adding that he didn’t blame Giuliani, who hasn’t been charged with any crime in connection with the scheme.

Outside of court, Parnas said he didn’t believe Giuliani would return the money.

“I don’t think he’ll pay it back because as you can see he’s taken the road of no return. He’s just an evil man, unfortunately, and someone I’m very, very sad to see. ‘must have met,’ he said.

Giuliani, who was working as Trump’s personal attorney at the time, said he knew nothing of the crimes of Parnas and others.

Federal prosecutors are investigating whether Giuliani’s interactions with prominent Ukrainians violated a federal law that governs lobbying on behalf of foreign countries or entities.

Parnas and a business associate, Igor Fruman, came to the attention of reporters after arranging large donations to Republican politicians, including a $325,000 donation to a political action committee supporting Trump.

An October conviction also supported a finding he made illegal donations in 2018 to promote a new energy company.

During Parnas’ sentencing hearing, the judge also heard from others who had lost money to him in failed business deals.

Dianne Pues said the businessman ‘destroyed my life’ when he failed to repay the money she and her husband lent him to produce a film called ‘Anatomy of an Assassin’.

Parnas promised he would become a new person, occasionally turning around in court to look for victims as he expressed his contrition.

“I would like to apologize to Mr. Gucciardo. Even though I never spent a dollar of his money. I lied to him and used our friendship. Charles, I’m sorry,” he said.

11 outfits you need to pack for your next vacation

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A carefully planned summer vacation requires a carefully curated wardrobe. This summer, there are so many beautiful outfit options to choose from, especially from independent brands. Below, we’ve selected 11 perfect summer vacation looks from today’s hottest brands.

1. Rebecca Taylor: Phoenix Flower Top and Flair Pants

This pant and top set is a lovely airy set with a flower and leaf print on habotai silk. Show off your back with this flattering top with a discreet tie closure and airy pants inspired by 1920s Japanese scarves. This outfit is perfect for sunset drinks with a view in a place like the Greek Isles, where your outfit matches. to the blues and oranges of the golden hour.

If you’re in the market for swimwear, Rebecca Taylor has also recently collaborated with St Barths-based swimwear brand FISCH to release some gorgeous printed swimwear.

2. Flower of Evil: Only players slip

A strappy dress is the real MVP when it comes to holiday packing – it takes up almost no space and can be dressed up or down. This Fleur du Mal silk charmeuse number comes in custom cards and a floral print, and while some briefs can be a little shapeless, this one has a very flattering bias cut that accentuates your curves.

3. Retroparty: Calypso Dress

This trendy dress is the perfect cover up for a beach club in Mykonos or the South of France, or with a slip underneath you can wear it to a fun summer party. It featured multicolored crochet beads and is sure to make a statement wherever you go.

4. Juliet Dunn: Pink baby doll dress with tone-on-tone Ric Rac

A babydoll dress is an ideal outfit on a scorching day with its airy silhouette. This Juliet Dunn dress in white features the brand’s famous ric rac trimmed hemline. The fabric is 100% linen and holds up well on hot days without creasing, which also makes it very suitable for suitcases.

5. FARM Rio: White Monstera Bow Midi Dress

This tropical dress is both casual and sexy, with skin-baring cutouts and an airy fit. Even on cloudy days, the monstera print immediately announces the holidays and with a pair of heels you are ready for a night out on the town.

6. STAUD- Jewel Skirt and Mallory Top

Take the popular skirt and top look to the next level with this STAUD number that features hammered medallions at the hem of the skirt and top. This look is practically asking for a shimmy on a dance floor at a popular beach venue this summer.

7. Plan C: Floral Print Crop Top and Long skirt

Show off your belly with this floral print summer set. Crafted from 100% cotton, the flowy skirt is ideal for sightseeing on a hot day or enjoying a glass of wine alfresco.

8. Mara Hoffman: Sloane dress

Red looks fantastic on tanned skin, and this Mara Hoffman dress sizzles with its striking hue and double-take-worthy popcorn material. Not only is the fabric unique, but it’s also made from ethical Birla material that you can wear with pleasure.

9. SWFs: Sweetheart Halter Top and Cuixmala long skirt

Do you like geometric prints? Then this set is for you. Inspired by the resort town of Cuixmala in western Mexico, this bandeau top and skirt are fun and flirty on summer days.

10. Simon Miller – Beaded Iwa pants and Beaded Winjy Top

This pearl black set is accented with colorful beads and is ready to go anywhere, whether you’re saddled up at the bar or making a move on the dance floor this summer.

11. Vanessa Mooney– Elizabeth Romper

This strapless romper dress is flattering and sexy without revealing too much (while it looks like a mini dress, it’s actually a romper with a closure). Pair it with a bustier or belt for a gorgeous hourglass figure.

‘Warzone’ Fortune’s Keep Map Tips: Loadouts, Easter Eggs & Money

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Last week, the developers of “Call of Duty: Warzone” released the new Resurgence map Fortune’s Keep, a hybrid of Rebirth Island and the larger Caldera map. The colonial-era island with a World War II-inspired aesthetic overlaid on it features a medieval keep, winery, lighthouse, and plenty of photo spots.

After playing Fortune’s Keep for a few hours and scoring a few wins, I’ve put together some tips that will help you find good fortune on the jewel of the Adriatic. As always, positioning, map knowledge, and understanding the best weapon metas will be key to your success.

Take advantage of verticality

From the top of Keep to Town Streets to the bottom of Grotto, Fortune’s Keep features many elevation changes. Knowing when to take the high ground and when to retreat will help you master this card.

Fortune’s Keep offers several ways to reach the heights. The vines lead to the top of the keep and other buildings in the city. It’s also easier than ever to access rooftops by climbing adjacent buildings, jumping to the top and then traversing them like Jason Bourne.

Maintaining heights is by default the best option. (Ask Anakin Skywalker about that.) You have the advantage of thousands of lines of sight on the map and can easily chart your course if the gas closes in behind you. It’s also incredibly difficult for an enemy team to aim high at you. You can stay on a headglitch (when only the tip of your head is visible behind an object, but you can still shoot back) quite easily in a few places. In Grotto, for example, you can look out from the edge of the cave entrance and be able to see any enemy players crouching behind rocks below much more easily than they can see you. Simple geometry will win you shootouts.

The future of Call of Duty and ‘Warzone’

My first impression of Fortune’s Keep is that silver (or gold bullion, in this case) is plentiful. In addition to the usual ways to get money in “Warzone”, there is a new in-game event that will surely help you fill your coffers.

During the 2nd and 4th circles, the AI ​​soldiers will attempt to transport money into the helicopter. You can continue to interact with the money bag to collect money until the event ends. It’s a source of easy money, but it represents a big target on your back. And be careful: these soldiers can shoot, and they wear armor.

Another option is to look for areas on the map that have a dollar icon. These locations have high-value loot and extra cash, and they change every turn. However, landing there may not be the best strategy for people who play less aggressively, as more players will gravitate towards these areas. If “slow and steady” sounds like your style, you might be better off looting a UAV or reviving and holding out until the free loadout.

When purchasing items, exercise extreme caution. In Fortune’s Keep, virtually every buy station exposes you. Quickly use the station before other teams have a chance to set up with loadouts, or have a teammate watch your back.

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Best Fortune’s Keep Loadouts

From launch, pairing a reliable Assault Rifle like the NZ-44 with a Submachine Gun (SMG) like the new Marco-5 or the H4 Blixen is the best option for Fortune’s Keep. The NZ-44 lets you take on longer engagements from rooftops, while SMGs let you get into tunnels and take out prowlers in the shadows. Do note, however, that Marco-5’s base and floor loot don’t have the best attachments. Once you unlock it at battle pass level 15, I recommend fully upgrading it if you have the time.

Like on the old Rebirth Island map (which will be in rotation starting June 30), using a mobile sniper like the Kar-98 isn’t a bad choice either. But long-range headshots won’t immediately knock players down, but rather break their shields.

While Caldera is more open following recent vegetation adjustments, Fortune’s Keep is much less so, with an abundance of cover in the form of boulders, tents, breastworks, wagons, and boxes. If you find yourself unable to make a long-range engagement with your loadout, you can easily close the distance by running between different map assets. Additionally, equipping the Serpentine perk will reduce incoming damage during Tactical Sprint.

Fortune’s Keep is also filled with underground passages, secret rooms, and plenty of nooks and crannies to hide in. It’s a camper’s paradise – and for people learning the map, it can help turn the tide in a firefight.

You can easily lose a team hunting you down and retreat to a room, giving you a chance to heal yourself or reload your weapons. I went down one level in the dungeon, ran from the back, ran up the wall and flanked the enemy team. At that point, I’m ready for another engagement.

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Easter eggs are high risk, high reward

While browsing Fortune’s Keep, chances are you’ve noticed shovels and wine glasses strewn about the loot piles of downed enemies. They look like abandoned objects and weapons, but are surrounded by gold. These are the keys to finding gold loot and free self-revives.

“Call of Duty” news site ModernWarzone has uncovered a few hidden challenges in Fortune’s Keep. If you take a shovel from the grave or random locations on the map, you can unearth “buried treasure” in the form of legendary weapons. There are two bottles of wine hidden in Keep (they are always in the same place); take them and you’ll discover a hidden room behind a bookcase full of goodies. By lighting three candles in the graveyard and paying homage to one of the tombstones summons a zombie that drops self-revive when you kill it.

According to the Twitter user Mr. Fishy McFishyou can also deposit money in a Fountain in Winery, which spits out rewards proportional to the amount you part with.

During the time spent on these Easter Eggs, you could just as easily pick up enough cash for a loadout. Also, while focusing on completing the mission, you may get shot by enemy soldiers. I would recommend trying these easter eggs at least once and focusing on the game afterwards.

The proof is in the sewers: COVID-19 is on the rise again in Greece

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THESSALONIKI – The easing of health restrictions to attract more tourists has led to a resurgence of the COVID-19 pandemic in the country, with cases quadrupling in a week to more than 12,000 samples per day and sewage in Thessaloniki showing a sharp increase.

An analysis by Aristotle University’s sewage epidemiology team showed such a spike that Greece’s second-largest city’s COVID hazard alert was placed in the high-risk red category.

Health Minister Thanos Plevris, however, with the arrival of hordes of tourists, said it was not them or the withdrawal of sanitary measures that caused the big jump, but the sub-variants of Omicron to blame , reflecting 90% of the viral load.

Health advisers said after six weeks with a moderate level of the virus in the community it was spreading rapidly again, with the government only saying it would review health measures in September if necessary.

“The increase in the spread of the virus, as we have measured in sewage in recent weeks and more clearly in recent days, is not insignificant…we now have data that puts us on alert” , said Professor Nikos Papaioannou, the rector of Aristotle. The university which is responsible for the research project, told the state-run Athens-Macedonia news agency AMNA.

ON THE BOOKS: Did a man write the Ferrante books?

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“Relationships between women don’t have solid rules like those between men.” — Elena Ferrante at Vogue magazine in 2014

Nobody knows who Elena Ferrante really is – the identity of the author is a secret.

Normally, when I hear something like that, my reaction is silent. I understand why a writer might not want to become a celebrity, but also suspect that someone is engaged in image making. You can make a mark by being reclusive and mysterious; while I suppose artists have the right to market themselves however they see fit – and understand that sometimes image is art – I don’t feel compelled to care much about these fun games.

But you may remember that a few years ago it was rumored that Ferrante, author of bestsellers ‘My Brilliant Friend’ and ‘The Lost Daughter’, was actually a man who chose to write in as a woman. This vaguely misogynistic school of thought took a hit in 2016 when an Italian journalist named Claudio Gatti alleged that Ferrante was Anita Raja, a woman who works to translate German books into Italian.

Gatti arrived at this conclusion thanks to good old journalistic approaches; an anonymous source provided him with financial documents showing that Raja had received payments from Ferrante’s publisher in accordance with the performance of Ferrante’s novels. He followed the money.

Then in 2018, Ferrante scholars – they apparently exist – alleged that they had, through stylometric analysis, determined that Ferrante’s novels were in fact written by the prolific Italian novelist Domenico Starnone.

Stylometry is the statistical analysis of a writer’s style via quantifiable factors, such as sentence length, vocabulary diversity, frequency of word usage, etc. I read an article from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology on the limitations of stylometric analysis and learned that while it can be very accurate in determining provenance, most experts consider it inconclusive unless it is not supported by other evidence.

If Starnone was married to Raja, you would have both the stylometric analysis and the circumstantial evidence that Starnone was indirectly paid for the novels. So maybe you could conclude that Starnone was the author of the Ferrante books.

Well, Starnone is married to Raja, who had an independent relationship with the small publishing house Edizioni E/O, which published Ferrante’s books from the start. Starnone has also collaborated with E/O on a few non-fiction projects, while her fiction has been published by major Italian publishing house Feltrinelli.

There has been some push back on the idea that Starnone = Ferrante. Some Ferrante fans can’t believe a man can write with such sensitivity about female friendship. Others feel “cheated” that Ferrante has been “exposed” as a man. Alternative theories have been offered: Perhaps Raja is the writer of the family and the author of these novels published under the name Starnone.

By way of full disclosure, I’m a bit of a Ferrante skeptic. I’ve never read “My Brilliant Friend” or its three sequels that make up Ferrante’s “Neapolitan Quartet,” though I enjoyed the soapy HBO series that was made of it. I read “The Lost Girl”. I think Maggie Gyllenhaal did an amazing job adapting the book to the screen, and her movie is better – more subtle, more evocative – than the book, which was just okay. But I was reading the English translation of the novel, not the original Italian.

The most persuasive article I’ve seen on the matter was Elisa Sotgiu’s essay “Did Italian Academics Understand the Identity of Elena Ferrante?” published on the Lit Hub website in 2021. The gist of the TLDR story (too long; didn’t read) is that while Sotgiu admits she doesn’t want Starnone to have written the Ferrante books ( “my first impulse was to push this information aside, not talk about it, and not think about it too much either”, she writes), she concludes that it is highly likely that Starnone wrote the books, possibly in collaboration with Raja.

And that she was okay with that — because “Elena Ferrante is always a pleasure to read.”

■ ■ ■

A writer must be able to write in any voice he can imagine. Is anyone seriously going to claim that Tolstoy and Flaubert couldn’t write believable female characters?

But just because you’re allowed to try something doesn’t mean you’re going to do it right. In his essay, Sotgiu perceptively notes that Starnone’s style and concerns do not change whether he writes as Ferrante or under his own name – his female characters are much the same as his male characters. Maybe that’s the thing. Just explore human occupations and obsessions and change pronouns if needed.

I thought of this while reading Julie Mayhew’s novel about toxic female friendship, “Little Nothings” (Bloomsbury, $26). It really is a classy, ​​summer kind of book, more of a dark comedy than a full-on horror show about an insecure young wife and mother, Liv, who bonds with two other young moms in the same situation, Beth and Binnie.

Soon they are joined by the wealthy and ambitious Ange, who takes the lead of the group, leading them on alcoholic and consumerist adventures, pushing the limits of Liv’s economic bandwidth.

When Ange suggests the four couples and their children go to an exclusive resort in Corfu for three weeks, Liv is unable to decline the invitation, despite financial pressure and a little passive-aggressive sting from Ange (which obviously has sniffed out Liv’s deep feelings of social insecurity).

Mayhew, who has starred, directed and worked in radio, gives the book a palpable tension that reminds me of the lavish HBO series (based on Liane Moriarty’s best-selling “Big Little Lies”) and the novel “The Group” by Mary McCarthy in 1963, which chronicled the post-college life of a clique of Vassar girls in the 1930s. socio-economic realities as well as his lucid critique of the complexity and dynamics that exist between, well, human beings.

It’s a thoroughly enjoyable novel that shouldn’t be ghettoized like a beach book – and certainly not quite as posh.

E-mail: [email protected]

Release video of Todt Hill burglary; trainer arrested in ump attack: Staten Island’s top crime stories of the week

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STATEN ISLAND, NY – Here’s a look at the top criminal justice headlines in our borough over the past seven days:

TODT HILL ROCK-TOSS HEIST Caught ON CAMERA

The NYPD is asking for the public’s help in locating five men wanted for questioning in connection with a series of terrifying burglaries where individuals threw rocks to smash windows and attacked upscale Staten Island homes amid the night.

Shocking video of an incident released Wednesday by the NYPD shows five men standing in front of a back sliding glass door in a backyard on Todt Hill earlier this week. One of the individuals throws a large rock through the door, shattering the glass. Four males enter the house through a large hole.

Click here for the story.

Todt Hill resident Marcello Sciarrino, victim of a recent burglary, speaks at a press conference on Thursday. (Staten Island lead/Joseph Ostapiuk)

DETAILS OF HURRY VICTIM SCARY ENCOUNTER

Marcello Sciarrino and his family were sleeping early Monday morning when they were startled by a loud noise that sounded like “an explosion”.

Sciarrino thought a car may have crashed into his Todt Hill home or his roof collapsed as he rushed to investigate. “I was shocked when I ran down the hall to check on my kids and my eldest son is screaming that there are people in the house,” Sciarrino said.

Click here for the story.

Shooting

The NYPD responds to a shooting on Victory Boulevard in Tompkinsville on Tuesday, June 21, 2022. (Staten Island Advance/David Luces)

18-YEAR-OLD MAN ARRESTED SHOOTING OUTSIDE DELI

An 18-year-old man was arrested Thursday in connection with the shooting of a 22-year-old victim outside a deli in Tompkinsville, police said.

The male victim was shot in the head shortly before 6 p.m. Tuesday outside 35 Victory Blvd.

Click here for the story.

Jerry Otero

New Jersey police have charged Jerry Otero, 40, of Staten Island, with the alleged assault of an umpire at a youth baseball tournament earlier this month. (Courtesy/SCPO)

THE SO LOADED YOUTH BASEBALL COACH

A Staten Island youth baseball coach is facing criminal charges after an umpire allegedly assaulted earlier this month at a tournament in New Jersey.

Jerry Otero, 40, a coach for the New York Prospects travel team, turned into detectives at the Branchburg Township Police Department on Tuesday morning, according to a statement released hours later by the department.

Click here for the story.

MAN ALLEGEDLY DRAWN WEAPON DURING NYPD/FBI ARREST

A 22-year-old man allegedly threatened to kill NYPD officers and FBI agents when arresting the suspect in his home community of Mariners Harbor, according to a source with knowledge of the investigation.

Authorities apprehended Christian Stokes of Coonley Court with a gun near a bodega on the 3000 block of Richmond Terrace near Harbor Road around 3:45 p.m. Thursday, according to an NYPD spokeswoman.

Click here for the story.

NYPD: ROAD-RAGE STOP NETS FAKE GUN

Officers confiscated a fake weapon during a road rage incident that led to the arrest of a 20-year-old man near the West Shore Freeway, police say.

Omrao Alrajebagha of Kenilworth Avenue in Greenridge was arrested with the fake gun around 11 a.m. Wednesday on Englewood Avenue and West Shore Expressway in Charleston, according to an NYPD spokeswoman.

Click here for the story.

Suspects charged with drug activity in Oakwood

The arrests took place in particular near Guyon and Falcon avenues in Oakwood. (Staten Island Advance/Jan Somma-Hammel)

2 CHARGED WITH DRUG POSSESSION IN OAKWOOD

Police arrested a 35-year-old man and a 36-year-old woman who allegedly drove around Oakwood with drugs and a large sum of cash one afternoon in June.

Eagle-eyed officers spotted a black Dodge Ram that allegedly drove through a stop sign on Falcon and Guyon avenues on June 2 around 4:45 p.m., according to the criminal complaint, which was based on an investigation by Narcotics Borough Staten Island.

Click here for the story.

Midland Beach

Anthony Maniscalco was apprehended at Seaver Avenue and Capodanno shortly after the assault, which occurred around 8 p.m. on June 10 near parking lot number seven, according to the criminal complaint.

MAN, 38, CHARGED WITH ATTACK ON PARKS COP

A 38-year-old man attacked a City Parks Department Law Enforcement Patrol officer in Midland Beach just weeks after he was released from jail, authorities say.

Anthony Maniscalco, who lives on Capodanno Boulevard in South Beach, has an extensive criminal record that includes violent encounters with law enforcement officers and about 50 prior arrests, according to multiple sources.

Click here for the story.

A charm offensive with multiple benefits

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Tourism, real estate, defence, energy, environment and agrotechnology. These areas are increasingly at the center of bilateral concerns for Greece and Israel, creating opportunities that could lead to a multiplier advantage for the Eastern Mediterranean and, ultimately, for Europe.

This momentum was reflected in the first Israel-Greece conference recently organized by the Israeli newspaper Calcalist in partnership with Brown Hotels. Held at Isla Brown Corinthia, the two-day event brought together senior government and financial officials from both countries for social, business and professional encounters.

Six Israeli officials spoke with Kathimerini on the sidelines of the event about the future of geopolitical and especially economic ties, explaining why Greece is central to Israel’s plans. The conclusion was that each country stands to gain from the other.

Yoel Razvozov

Israeli tourism minister

Tourism figures this year exceeded experts’ expectations. Despite pessimistic forecasts, after two tough years of the pandemic, people are eager to travel, spend money and discover new destinations. In 2019, 150,000 Israelis visited Greece. Conversely, 45,000 Greeks visited Israel. Now we are expanding cooperation in tourism between our countries and I expect these factors, together with our hard work, to lead to an increase in tourist numbers in both directions.

I found a great partner and friend in Greece, Vassilis Kikilias, the minister of tourism. During my visit to Greece this time, we discussed several ways to strengthen our cooperation, such as academic exchanges, innovation in tourism, encouraging investment and promoting joint marketing on target markets such as the United States and the Far East. Tourism in Greece plays a very central role in the economy – it accounts for around 25% of your GDP – so I think we can learn from your knowledge and experience.

I believe that like everywhere else in the world, in Israel we have also seen a drop in incoming tourism from Russia and Ukraine as a result of the conflict. Nevertheless, in March this year, 200,000 tourists visited Israel, so tourism is coming back. In order to fill this gap, we must look for new markets and explore new opportunities. For example, the Abraham Accords and the new regional reality in the Middle East are opening up new opportunities for tourists, both regionally and globally.

Meni Weitzmann

Real estate and tourism entrepreneur

a-charming-offensive-with-multiple-benefits2Greece has gone through a difficult period over the past decade, but it nevertheless remains the most attractive country in the world as a tourist destination. It has wonderful weather, amazing cuisine, and unique places and landscapes. And above all, it has generous, beautiful and wonderful people. These are the things that make Greece the top tourist destination.

Things started to change after the election of the current Prime Minister, who brought together an incredible team of civil servants, graduates from Harvard and other top universities. They are true Greek patriots who are here to help people and society and to move the economy forward. It is a pleasure to work with them and they play an important role in Greece’s imminent success. They understand that a quarter of Greece’s GDP comes from tourism and therefore put tourism at the top of the list.

What we are doing in Greece is a revolution like the world has never seen before. We visited three of the most unlikely areas – Omonia Square, Evia and Loutraki in Corinth – and invested heavily in many assets in these areas, bringing positive changes to their urban and socio-economic conditions and transforming them into destinations attractive tourist attractions. We are also investing in Crete, Corfu and Thessaloniki, but the focus will be on Omonia, Evia and Loutraki.

Together with the European Union and the Greek government – who have supported us so much – we are investing in infrastructure to develop these areas, whether it is upgrading Omonia Square or the Athens train and airport in Loutraki. Euboea, which has been badly damaged by fires recently, is equally important to us and we are investing in the development of hotels there.

Calcalist and General Manager Eyal Peer understood that there is a warm and growing relationship between Greece and Israel, and we have them to thank for cultivating this relationship. There is so much love and compassion between our two countries, and the people of Calcalist understood this and decided to organize this conference, with the aim of cultivating even more the bonds between the two nations.

Leon Avigad

Founder and co-owner of Brown Hotels

a-charming-offensive-with-multiple-benefits4We are moving forward, at full speed, based on our current plan, which sees new hotels opening within the year and even more in 2023. At the same time, we continue to consider possible new agreements, seeing even more destinations on the islands and mainland Greece. I would like to emphasize that we are very pleased with the new investments made by other major players, measures that maintain and strengthen our confidence in the Greek market.

All of us today, after these difficult two years of pandemic, are looking forward to getting on a plane, traveling to a vacation destination and soaking up the sun. And what better place can you think of than Greece? Israelis aren’t the only ones looking for beautiful beaches, historical sites, gastronomic delights. Items like these make up unique travel experiences suitable for every wallet. The growth margins are significant and our forecasts are very optimistic!

Cobi Bitton

CEO of the Israel-Greece Chamber of Commerce

a-charming-offensive-with-multiple-benefits6The deepening of Greek-Israeli relations is based on the major potential for mutually beneficial cooperation in a number of sectors, including the economy, trade, tourism, investment, agricultural development, defence, technology, energy, environment, navigation and education.

The multiple cooperation between the two countries aims to promote development and stability in the Eastern Mediterranean. This cooperation neither excludes nor is directed against any third party, while it is dictated by the multiple security challenges in the region.

Regular political consultations take place between the two foreign ministries.

Greece looks forward to the development of energy cooperation with Israel, both bilaterally and trilaterally, with the inclusion of Cyprus.

Within the trilateral framework, the three countries have expressed their desire to develop their cooperation at all levels.

The countries have signed agreements in several key areas to boost the economy, including energy, innovation, shipping, marine technologies, security, trade and tourism.

While strengthening its ties with Israel and the United States, Greece’s fast-growing energy sector plays a key role in its active foreign diplomacy. These ties are helping Greece survive difficult economic times while strengthening its role in the region.

Finally, particular mention should be made of the Greek State’s unfailing interest in the Patriarchate of Jerusalem, which is the living link between Orthodox Christianity and the Holy Land.

It is too early to assess the durability of the impacts of the war in Ukraine on the region and more particularly on the bilateral relations between Greece and Israel. But if the marginalization of Russia persists and if the European states most concerned about the future of this region do not seize this opportunity to reengage, it is possible that China will take the opportunity to advance its pawns everywhere, thus improving its position vis-à-vis the United States, provided that it too has not embarked on a military adventure. One thing seems certain: the Arab world, Turkey, Iran and Israel are watching with the greatest attention how the European Union and NATO will position themselves and manage the post-conflict situation when it arises. Any sign of weakness or pusillanimity will then be paid dearly and in cash.

Ayelet Nahmias-Verbine

President of the Israel Export Institute

a-charming-offensive-with-multiple-benefits8Trade relations are still insufficient compared to the strategic relationship built between the two countries. There is no doubt that the ties in tourism are strong and most certainly in the security sector – led by both governments.

Even in the field of tourism, there is a lot to do, because at the moment it is mainly imports – tourists from Israel to Greece and less in the other direction. We hope that some investments in this direction will strengthen and encourage Greeks to come to Israel.

However, two sectors are becoming increasingly relevant when it comes to Israel’s exports to Greece. The first is renewable energy. Several Israeli companies have already launched projects in Greece and I hope that the conference will give Israeli companies a chance to also connect with local companies and create joint ventures.

Another sector of growing importance in which Israel is a global player is water and ag-tech. Greek agriculture can benefit from Israeli technologies that allow local industry to be more efficient. On that note, there is also growing interest in food tech due to changing global circumstances – mainly climate but not only. Greek food industries that are at the forefront of quality can take advantage of our technologies to take it to the next level and produce accordingly.

The Israel Export Institute maintains close ties with the Greek government and we quite often host ministers, senior officials as well as Greek companies. We give them a detailed overview of the sectors and do our best to connect them with the relevant Israeli companies.

Yoel Esteron

Calcalist Editor

a-charming-offensive-with-multiple-benefits10It is part of our vision and mission to bring together Israeli business leaders and international business leaders from around the world. Calcalist has organized hundreds of conferences and meetings in Tel Aviv, New York, London, Berlin and recently in Dubai.

As we witnessed the incredible recovery of the Greek economy, we felt it was time to come to Athens and explore the many opportunities for collaboration between Israel and Greece.

There is so much to do to strengthen commercial and cultural ties between our two nations.

Foreign Forces Archives – Page 300 of 300

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Iran threatens to exploit the Strait of Hormuz, oil markets react, global economies take notice, and more naval forces are sent to the region, raising the stakes for Tehran and the US Navy.

Late last year, the commander-in-chief of Iran’s navy, Admiral Habibollah Sayyari, warned that closing the strait would be “easier than drinking a glass of water”. The Obama administration has publicly dismissed the threat as “saber-braking”, but has also privately advised Tehran that attempting to close the strait would trigger a US military response.

“The laying of mines in international waters is an act of war,” Vice Admiral Mark Fox, commander of the US Navy’s Fifth Fleet, said in a Feb. 12 interview.
“We, under the direction of the national leadership, would prevent this from happening. We always have the right and the obligation of self-defense and that is self-defense. If we did nothing and allowed some mining, it would be a long and difficult process to clean them up.

Whether it is an act of war or not (international rules – certainly more honored in their violation than observation – authorize the exploitation in peacetime of the high seas under certain strict conditions), the Iranian officials have threatened to close the Strait of Hormuz in response to Western sanctions over its nuclear program.

U.S. Navy photo of the USS Enterprise and USS Cape St. George passing through the Strait of Hormuz on May 11.

But the ultimate impact of such an escalation – if only in rhetoric – is unclear. According to a Jan. 23 report by the Congressional Research Service “…as in the past, the prospect of a major disruption to maritime traffic in the strait risks damaging Iranian interests. US and allied military capabilities in the region remain formidable. This makes an outright and prolonged closure of the strait unlikely. Nonetheless, such threats may heighten tensions in global energy markets and force the United States and other global oil consumers to consider the risks of another potential conflict in the Middle East.


A key transportation route for a daily flow of 17 million barrels of oil – around 35% of the world’s oil trade by sea – according to the US Energy Information Administration, the Strait of Hormuz is around 175 miles long nautical miles and narrows to 21 nautical miles. miles wide, making it an “international strait” under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. These international straits, which are completely surrounded by the 12-mile territorial seas of the coastal states, enjoy protective under the UNCLOS regime, even though the United States has not yet ratified the treaty.

Since the end of World War II, mines have severely damaged or sunk four times as many US Navy ships as all other means of attack combined. Fifteen of the 19 ships fell victim to mines. And that doesn’t include many more sunken or mine-damaged ships, from the Corfu Channel crisis of 1946 to the Persian Gulf tanker wars of the 1980s to the sinking of the MV’s Tamil Sea Tigers. Invincible In 2008.

During the Tanker War in the Persian Gulf, Iraq and Iran indiscriminately deployed several types of mines, including variants of the 1908 Russian-designed contact mine that nearly sank the USS frigate. Samuel B. Roberts (FFG-58) in April 1988. After the United States agreed to provide protection for the tanker convoys, the first convoy ran into trouble when the American-flagged supertanker MV Bridgeton struck a mine which gouged a large hole in her hull. Almost immediately, US Navy surface warships lined up astern Bridgeton, belying the adage that every ship can be a minesweeper once. If more mines were present, Bridgeton was to clear the way.

In 1990 and 1991, Iraq deployed more than 1,300 mines in the northern Gulf, including a weapon never before seen in the West. In the early morning of February 18, 1991, the USS Tripoli (LPH-10), carrying airborne mine countermeasures helicopters, struck an Iraqi contact mine; four hours later, the cruiser Aegis Princeton (CG-59) fell victim to a Manta mine, a “mission-kill” that took the cruiser out of the war and cost around $100 million to bring it back online. More at the point of the impact of a possible Iranian mining campaign in 2012, it took multinational Coalition forces more than two years of intensive mine countermeasures operations to declare the northern Gulf mine-free.

According to then-Chief of Naval Operations, Admiral Gary Roughead, in 2009 more than one million mines of 300 types were in the inventories of more than 65 navies. Russia had about 250,000 mines. The Chinese Navy is estimated to have around 100,000 mines, including a rising mine that could be deployed in waters deeper than 6,000 feet. And North Korea had about 50,000 mines. All three sell weapons to virtually any navy or terrorist group, anywhere, anytime, as do about 17 other countries.

Iran has acquired a stockpile of 3,000 to 6,000 mines, mostly of Soviet/Russian, Chinese or North Korean origin. Most are unsophisticated but still dangerous floating contact mines, such as those that damaged Robert and Tripoli. Other mines, like the Manta that hit Princeton, are bottom mines that come to rest on the bottom and wait for a target to satisfy various parameters. These influence mines are triggered when increasingly sophisticated target detection devices detect the magnetic, acoustic, seismic, water pressure, and electrical potential signatures of their victims.

An Iranian mine, the Chinese-made EM-52, is a multiple-influence (acoustic, magnetic, pressure) rocket-propelled mine armed with a 600-pound high-explosive warhead, which can be deployed by naval vessels. surface in waters as deep as 600 feet.

The inventory is also believed to include around 600 advanced multi-influence mines purchased from Russia, including MDM-3 which can be dropped from aircraft.

Mines can be emplaced by virtually any underwater, surface, and airborne platform. To effectively mine the entire Strait of Hormuz would require thousands of mines and several weeks or more. Iran could use Kilo-class submarines, which can carry 24 mines. But a larger operation should also involve small craft and possibly commercial vessels. A 2010 report by the Near East and Gulf Institute for Military Analysis shows these Iranian capabilities of the minelaying platform:

Physics will help delineate the problem. Generally, the water depth of the strait ranges from around 200 feet to 300 feet, but its northwest approaches are shallower, around 120 feet deep. In the strait itself, depths can reach 1,000 feet and currents make the deployment of bottom mines an uncertain tactic. If deployed in deep water, even large warhead bottom mines would have a limited effect on surface traffic.

Libya’s Red Sea mining in the summer of 1984, for example, used multi-influence bottom mines exported by East Germany, totally unknown to the West. Ships that detonated mines in deeper water suffered significantly less damage than those in shallower water. (A total of 23 ships reported being mine victims, although four were later assessed as insurance scams.)

Not that bottom mines wouldn’t be employed where it makes operational sense, but Iran would likely rely on bottom-moored contact mines that hide near the surface but remain difficult to detect and defeat. .

Mines are just one element of Iran’s anti-access/area denial weapons, which include speedboats armed with guns and missiles, small and mini submarines armed with torpedoes, anti-ship missiles based on land and planes.

In response to Iran’s rattling mines, the Navy is deploying four additional Avenger-class MCM ships to the region, for a total of eight Avengers, along with two more MH-53E airborne MCM helicopters added to the two already in theater. The additional units will be based in Bahrain, home to the navy’s Fifth Fleet. “I came to the conclusion that we could do better to prepare the theater,” said Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Jonathan Greenert to the Senate Armed Services Committee during a Navy budget hearing earlier this year. “I wanted to be sure…that we are ready, that our people are competent, that they are confident and that they are good at what they do when needed.”

The Navy also announced that the USS Mackerel (LPD-15) is being refitted to support naval forces in the region, primarily focused on the MCM mission. A provisional Advanced Intermediate Afloat Base (AFSB), its “main battery” will consist of AMCM helicopters and support craft. This too has been done before, with the mid-1990s conversion of USS Inchon (LPH/MCS-12) as the MCM command and control vessel.

In addition, the naval MCM “order of battle” includes several Royal Navy MCM ships and Royal Australian Navy assets, as well as MCM capabilities from regional US maritime partners.

“It’s a volume issue more than a technical challenge,” Navy Lt. Cmdr. Wayne Liebold, captain of the USS Gladiator (MCM-11), one of the Avenger MCM ships based in Bahrain, said The Huffington Post. “My concern is going out there and having to search for a large volume of water with large amounts of mines,” said Liebold, who has completed three MCM deployments to the gulf.

Although easily detectable, the laying of several hundred mines in a few days could have a significant, albeit temporary, effect on commercial and naval mobility. More generally, however, the impact on global oil markets is unclear. During the Red Sea and Gulf of Suez mining crisis of 1984, commercial and naval traffic continued unabated, despite reports of underwater explosions, and world oil prices virtually stagnated. not been affected.

“Conventional wisdom might suggest that the outbreak of hostilities in the Strait of Hormuz or the Persian Gulf would significantly halt or discourage the flow of maritime traffic through the strait,” said Cmdr. Rodney A. Mills wrote in a 2008 Naval War College study, “But the ‘tanker wars’ between Iran and Iraq in the 1980s show a different behavior of the shipping industry. During the eight years of conflict, 544 attacks were carried out against all ships in the Gulf, leaving more than 400 civilians killed and 400 others injured. However, after an initial drop of 25%, the shipping industry adjusted to the risk and trade flow picked up. Despite the threat, oil and other maritime commerce continued to flow even as the conflict escalated until 1987, when a total of 179 attacks were carried out, roughly one attack every two days.

In short, although Iranian mines may not be obstacles, they can certainly be speed bumps that attack strategies, plans and deadlines, in addition to ships and submarines.

Greek island ferry fares rise again

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Greek ferry operators price increase to the Greek islands up to 10 percent this month, citing soaring fuel prices.

This is the second increase in ferry fares since April, with the majority of cabotage companies raising fares by 5-10%. In April, tickets were up 10-12%.

According to local media, a a third increase in ferry fares could follow for certain destinations and lines in July. It should be noted that July and August are peak seasons for tourism in Greece.

Faced with rising fuel prices, cabotage companies have demanded adjustments to rental charges on the routes, 42 in total, covered by one-year contracts. Greek ferry operators are expressing concerns about the impact of the Russian-Ukrainian war on the sector. Fuel now accounts for 70% of a ship’s operating costs, up from 40% a year ago, they add.

Indicative prices for ferries to the Greek islands:

– the single ticket from the port of Rafina to Mykonos went from 35 euros to 38 euros, up 8.57%, and on the Rafina – Tinos line went from 32 euros to 35 euros, up 9.38% .

-the one-way fare from Rafina to Andros increased by 8.70% to 25 euros from 23 euros

– from Piraeus to Naxos, the price of a single ticket increased by 5.49%, from 45.50 euros to 48 euros. For high-speed ferries to the same destination, a single ticket now costs 67.40 euros from 63.70 euros

-single tickets from Piraeus to Rhodes now cost 86.50 euros instead of 82.50 euros, up 4.85%, while a ticket to Patmos from Piraeus has gone from 50 euros to 52.50 euros , up 4%

-for the popular islands of Paros from Piraeus a one-way ticket costs 46.50 euros, for Milos 45.50 euros from 43.00 euros.

-families or groups of four with a car will have to pay 489.50 euros to get to Rhodes from Piraeus, from 466.50 euros, an increase of 4.93%.

Earlier this year, Greek Shipping Minister Yiannis Plakiotakis called on shipping companies to absorb the increases as much as possible “so that travelers are not overburdened”.


Follow GTP headlines on Google News to keep up to date with all the latest news on tourism and travel in Greece.

A Home on Shelter Island: Supporting Local Agriculture

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Last weekend I experienced my first pickup as a CSA member at Sylvester Manor. For years I was a strong supporter, and at least a weekly farm stand shopper, but I had never been a CSA member.

My knowledge of ASC over the years has grown tremendously, but started with something like, “What are all those people doing over there? They just come for vegetables every week? I wasn’t sure what was going on, but it definitely seemed like there was an internal ‘club’ of veggie lovers that I didn’t know about.

When I inquired, I was told that these clients were part of the CSA. I didn’t know what that meant exactly, and the general response still didn’t really clarify what I was missing, but I continued to buy my tomatoes and carrots anyway.

Eventually I learned more about the CSA process and understood what exactly was going on.

Community Supported Agriculture (or CSA model) is a system that allows the consumer to subscribe or pay a lump sum at the start of the season (or even in winter), and in return will usually receive a weekly or bi-weekly allowance of produce or other agricultural goods, without producing additional cash.

The upfront payment from the customer is extremely crucial to the grower as early season cash flow used to purchase things such as seed, soil, equipment, rent, wages, etc. The client also agrees to participate in some of the agricultural risks as well; an ideal harvest year offers an additional bonus to the consumer, and conversely, an extremely difficult weather year may mean fewer items in the weekly box.

Once I learned about ASC and what it would mean for me as a client, I watched the process for a few years, but was hesitant to join.

What if we weren’t going to be around for a few weeks to pick up our share? What if we needed 20 potatoes and 20 corn on the cob for a BBQ but the weekly CSA only has spinach and eggplant? As a commercial insurance underwriter, I analyze all possible risks and am keenly aware of weather-related issues, wondering if my risk-averse tendencies might feel comfortable enough with the model.

This winter, at the beginning of January, I decided that I was ready to join the CSA and finally become a member. I felt confident in the annual yields produced and I always appreciate the quality of the products.

So I paid my dues and looked forward to the first weekly pickup. I brought my reusable bags and a few friends to the farm on Saturday morning, and this week I enjoyed some lovely arugula salads (perfectly paired with local strawberries) and learned to cook with garlic scapes (sautéed or toast – add to scrambled eggs!)

There are other benefits to belonging to the CSA besides heads of lettuce and bunches of radishes. There are pick-your-own options every week, the ability to bring pre-consumer food waste back for composting, and a general sense of community.

I look forward to meeting staff and volunteers, to meeting neighbors and friends and a sense of support and commitment.

There are also a few other local CSA options. Saturday morning visits to the Historical Society Farmers’ Market are a chance to meet many of the producers who also offer flowers, meats, cheeses, eggs, fish and other produce.

Bring your tote bag and a sense of curiosity as you stroll through the market – learn about CSA options and enjoy supporting the local farming community.

Inside London’s struggle to wean itself off Russian billions

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Early morning On March 14, a small group of men, dressed mostly in black, broke into one of London’s largest mansions, setting off its alarm system. The six-storey residence, with a white stucco facade, sits on a busy 19th-century development that for decades was home to various viscounts, earls and dukes. Not far from Buckingham Palace, the Houses of Parliament in Westminster and an arch commemorating Britain’s victory over Napoleon, the property shares a prestigious postcode with the embassies of Spain, Portugal, Germany, from Austria, Turkey and Norway. Once the residence of Britain’s Secretary of State for War and the Colonies, 5 Belgrave Square has more recently been one of many London outposts of a rather different but no less greedy kind of empire: that of the Russian wealth.

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The intruders called themselves London Makhnovists after an early 20th-century anarchist who sought to create a stateless society in what is now Ukraine. However, the target of their protest was not a state per se, but the buyer of the building in 2003, with its list price of $39 million. Oleg Deripaska, a trained physicist who founded aluminum giant Rusal, is one of the few extremely wealthy Russian businessmen to have bought up plum properties in the British capital. So, just weeks after forces from Moscow parachuted into Kyiv and millions of Ukrainians began crossing the borders into Eastern Europe, the anarchists decided that the vast empty property of Belgrave Square would be ideal for hosting refugees. They hung banners from its facade: a sky-blue one saying “this property has been liberated,” and a red one urging Russian President Vladimir Putin to fuck off.

Their actions have channeled a sense of convergence among ordinary citizens of various Western countries that the wealth of elite Russian businessmen – often built on the backs of state-owned companies – should no longer be a welcome import. In the UK, this view has coincided with an extraordinary shift at the heart of the establishment, with recent months concentrating the firepower of the judiciary, the Treasury and other levers of state on several individuals. Russians with alleged links to Putin – having been pampered for the past two decades with all the comforts, perks and privileges that the British capital and its political class has to offer. The men in question – for they have almost always been men – have wrapped their arms around football clubs, country estates, celebrity friendships and society columns. Roman Abramovich, a former business partner of Deripaska, bought a sprawling mansion just yards from Kensington Palace, around the corner from the Russian Embassy, ​​for over $100 million. While still at university, documents show, the Russian foreign minister’s daughter-in-law Polina Kovaleva paid $6 million in cash for her posh London apartment in a luxury new build; she detailed her glamorous life of yachts, swimming pools and sunny days in Kensington on Instagram. These property raids have earned London the nickname Moscow on the Thames, with children of oligarchs populating the city’s most prestigious schools and clubby society haunts. Wives, girlfriends and mistresses shop at Harrods, frequent the Serpentine Gallery and seek record divorce settlements in British courts. Virtually overnight, their financial and physical assets, as well as their social capital, were frozen. Some object that innocent individuals with no connection to the Kremlin, and their political donations, have been unfairly identified amid the fervor. However, in interviews with vanity lounge, more than a dozen activists, politicians and former government ministers lament that it took such dire events to trigger these actions, and many have wondered how long the burgeoning allergy to Russian wealth could last, especially regarding the ruling conservative party.

Anyway, in Belgrave Square, the city’s Metropolitan Police had not received the memo. Within hours, nearly a dozen of his vehicles were parked outside the property, with some 200 officers involved at a cost of more than $100,000. After a long period of door breaches, clashes atop a cherry picker and harnessed helmets inadvertently trying to scale a balcony, protesters were forcibly removed. They had then found a “basement full” of booze (not food) and captured video of opulent interiors, complete with furniture from a company founded by David Linley (aka the Earl of Snowdon, the nephew of the Queen Elizabeth), as well as “so many things”. that a normal human being shouldn’t have,” as one anarchist remarked to a reporter. The Makhnovists left no damage, but four were arrested for squatting.

Deripaska, an absentee owner, seemed displeased – and far from eager to be identified as the owner at all. He insisted through a representative that it was in fact members of his family who owned 5 Belgrave Square. UK land registry documents identify the legal owner of the house as a company called Ravellot Limited, registered in the British Virgin Islands. But a UK High Court ruling in 2007 registered the Belgrave Square house as Deripaska’s, and there’s been no indication that his title has since passed. His spokesman said the family was “appalled by the neglect of the UK justice system shown by Boris Johnson’s cabinet in bringing in the penalties and in collusion with the kind of people who plunder private property”. Last February, Deripaska predicted that there would be no invasion of Ukraine; after Russia’s onslaught, he called for peace talks. In late March, he called the conflict “madness” in which “all sides are recklessly preparing for a long-term war that will have tragic consequences for the entire world.” But when UK authorities targeted his assets he lashed out, saying there was ‘not a single fact to back up Boris’ cabinet fantasies’.

Forget Robert Mueller III’s investigation into the links between Kremlin figures and Donald Trump’s presidential campaign. The complex and intertwined relationship between Russia’s billions and modern Britain goes far beyond high-priced real estate. Successive Conservative prime ministers, from David Cameron to Theresa May to Boris Johnson, have been forced to respond to repeated geopolitical provocations, including the 2014 annexation of Crimea and the 2018 poisoning of a former Russian spy. living in Salisbury. But at the same time, each has sought to avoid the kind of overt criticism that could damage their prized relationships with a small coterie of wealthy Russian-born political donors. However, the invasion of Ukraine in February made this already precarious tightrope almost impossible to walk, and in the months that followed government ministers lined up to promote their anti-Putin bona fide with expeditions of arms to Ukraine, seizures of yachts, seizures of property and bank freezes. . The UK’s transport secretary – who fell victim to his own department’s COVID-related travel policies while on a family vacation – recently arrived at a London dock, a press crew in tow, to publicize the ownership of a superyacht called Phil. He said the ship – complete with an “infinite” wine cellar and freshwater swimming pool – had been “bogged down in all sorts of layers of almost deliberate, we think actually deliberate, attempts to conceal its true ownership”. The Conservative government’s recent crackdown masks an insidious malaise, with a number of Russian chickens returning home to roost. As one Belgrave Square protester told reporters before police arrested him, “the same money that funds the Russian war machine funds the Conservative Party”.

Lifeguards get huge pay rise in New York to save swimming season

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Need a summer job? Do you like the outdoors? You may want to become a lifeguard in New York State. The starting salary was increased this summer to address the shortage of lifeguards, and it’s not just pennies.

New York State Governor Kathy Hochul announced a salary increase to help address staffing shortages at beaches and pools at New York State Parks and Historic Sites, as well as at Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) day-use area campgrounds and beaches.

Young lifeguard with megaphone on beach background. Lifeguard on duty with a lifebuoy at the beach

Alexander Zhurilo

Pay for the hikes

“All New Yorkers deserve to be able to safely enjoy our public beaches and pools this summer,” Governor Hochul said. said. “With a shortage of lifeguards threatening access to bathing facilities, we are actively recruiting more lifeguards to ensure safe access to outdoor recreation during the summer months.”

Starting pay rates for lifeguards at upstate New York facilities will increase from $14.95 per hour to $20 per hour. Downstate lifeguards will drop from $18.15 per hour to $22 per hour. Changes take effect immediately.

New York Lifeguard

Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Recruitment events

On Friday, June 24, from 1 to 5 p.m., the DEC is hosting a lifeguard recruitment event at the Lake George Beach day-use area, commonly known as Million Dollar Beach. Learn more about the free training and certifications provided.

State Parks runs lifeguard certification courses on demand. A digital lifeguard recruitment campaign is ongoing until at least July 4, 2022, across all digital platforms.

All candidates must be willing to work weekends and holidays throughout the summer. For staffing opportunities at DEC Campgrounds and Beaches, visit the DEC websitecall (518) 457-2500, ext. 1, or email [email protected]

safe lifeguard tower stand with rescue board on sunny sandy beach

mirror-images/Think Stock

Hundreds of rescuers

The New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation oversees more than 250 parks, historic sites, recreational trails, golf courses, boat ramps, etc., which are visited by 78 million people every year.

Over 500 seasonal employees are hired by DEC each year to provide a variety of services throughout the summer season at 52 public campgrounds and 5 day-use areas in Adirondack and Catskill parks.

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10 Most Spectacular Honeymoon Destinations In Greece

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Greece, one of the most beautiful, romantic and idyllic countries in the world, is a dream destination for most, if not all, honeymooners. Home to lush landscapes, serene aquamarine waters, a splendid backdrop, an awe-inspiring sunset and whitewashed villages, this paradise promises lovers an unforgettable experience. Its natural charm also offers visitors serenity, intimacy and romance.



Although this paradise is full of beautiful places, some places are more breathtaking than others. Here are the top 10 picks.

ten Zante

Zakynthos, an island in Greece, is a must visit for all honeymooners. This paradise has pristine beaches, the most popular being Navagio Beach. It offers lovers many opportunities to enjoy the beauty of Mother Nature and relax as they bond. Here guests can practice adventure sports such as skyboarding and parachuting. Animal lovers can dive with the island’s famous loggerhead turtles. Plus, couples can watch the beautiful sunset over the Kerri Cliffs for the perfect romantic evening.

Related: What to expect in Greece if you visit during the summer

9 paros

Paros is a beautiful island made up of two islands connected by a bridge. Located on stunning beaches, visitors can swim, sunbathe and practice sports like windsurfing. Guests can also visit the villages found in this haven as they offer alluring scenery. Moreover, travelers can savor the appetizing local dishes such as snails. Lovers can also rent a boat and enjoy a more intimate ride to nearby Hydra or take an excursion. Its famous landmark, the magnificent white clock tower, is another place worth exploring.

8 Crete

Being the largest island in Greece, Crete is effortlessly one of the best destinations for honeymooners. This place is home to some of the most eye-catching beaches in the world, such as Elafonisi, well known for its sparkling turquoise waters and pink sand. This paradise has an attractive history, visible through the old towns and remote mountain villages that guests can visit. Gourmets and wine lovers are not left out as this magical place offers delicious first-class dishes. Finally, a visit to the old town of Chania is a must to complete a romantic getaway to this place. Its charming buildings and its Venetian port will leave an indelible mark on its visitors.

Related: 10 tips for visiting Greece (for beginners)

seven Corfu

Located west of the Ionian Sea, Corfu is one of the most beautiful islands in Greece and an ideal getaway for couples. It is well known for its spectacular hotels and the marvelous landscapes of the Albanian coast. You can discover the Adriatic Sea during the day and walk around this magical city at night. Visitors can also savor Greek cuisine by joining the olive tasting tour. With a rich history and monuments spread across the city, travelers can visit and learn about the ancient era of this remarkable place.

6 Mykonos

Popular for its summer party aura, Mykonos is a must visit for visitors looking to relax and have fun. Besides dancing the night away, lovers can spend the day relaxing on the beach, scuba diving or taking a trip to the nearby island of Delos. Explorers can also spend the day wandering around the main town, admiring the pretty avenues, art galleries and adorable boutiques. You can also bond over a delicious cup of coffee or an evening cocktail in Little Venice.

5 Rhodes

Rhodes is another scintillating place in Greece that vacationers need to check off their to-do list. This charming area is home to everything from beautiful beaches to iconic whitewashed cliffside apartments and ancient ruins. Besides being a wedding destination, this haven has many hidden romantic spots just waiting to be explored. Adventurers can visit the Acropolis of Lindos and other important sites on the island. Additionally, explorers can visit the Jewish Museum, Kameiros, and Tsambika Monastery.


4 Skopelos

Mainly known as the “Mama Mia” island, guests can explore their dance fantasies from their musical love stories. Here, tourists can visit the charming town of Chora, which has one of the most delicious cuisines on this island. Plus, with its white quartz sands and shimmering blue waters, lovers can swim or soak up the sun while capturing and admiring the incredible backdrop of this paradise. Explorers interested in more fun can book one of the boats, take a sunset cruise, and dance the night away, creating lasting memories with loved ones.

3 Athens

There’s nothing quite like enjoying a delicious candlelit dinner on a rooftop and marveling at the city’s breathtaking scenery. Athens offers this for newlyweds to cherish forever. For outdoor fanatics, hiking up Areopagus Hill, which offers dazzling views, is a great way to spend some time in this piece of paradise. At night, travelers can stroll along the Polignotou from Thissio to Plaka and admire the Acropolis in all its grandeur. Moreover, they can visit the rebetiko places in the Gazi district and experience great music, mouth-watering cocktails and the culture of the city.


2 Milo

Boasting some of the most captivating landscapes and coastlines with splendid romantic beaches, it is an ideal place for lovers to have a good time. Visitors can visit Plaka, a picture-perfect region rising on a hill with a phenomenal sea scene. Vacationers can head to Sarakiniko Beach, which prides itself on its outstanding green waters. Explorers can also view Milos from the old town of Mandrakia as they sip their cocktails and capture the alluring backdrop for future memories.

1 Santorini

Arguably Greece’s most famous island, Santorini is home to an unrivaled romantic flair. Besides being a place adored by most if not all lovebirds, this paradise has also become a wedding destination. Couples can savor local wines while enjoying delicious Greek bites. History buffs can take a trip to the archaeological site while hikers explore the awe-inspiring plans of Red Beach. Couples can also join the breathtaking sunset cruise, swim in the sparkling waters of red, black or white sand beaches and make their honeymoon memorable and unique.

Greek islands to visit if you want to avoid the crowds

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There is never a bad time to go to Greece. But if you’ve opened Instagram recently, you’ve probably noticed that it’s getting a little (okay, one plot) more popular in the summer, especially when it comes to hotspots like Mykonos and Santorini. Don’t let that deter you from flying to this beautiful country, though. It is a magical place, which is really worth the detour. However, you might consider venturing off the beaten track and trying the less touristy Greek islands instead to avoid the overwhelming crowds of the more popular spots.

Of course, that’s easier said than done. While you’ll probably have no problem finding information on where to stay in Santorini or party in Mykonos, digging up details about other under-the-radar islands in Greece presents a bit more of a challenge. The best place to shoot, then? Insiders and travel experts who live in or frequently visit the country and know the most ideal places to stay if you’re looking for a hidden gem.

So TZR sat down with a few of these folks to help out. Ahead, they offer their insights into not only which islands to visit, but also their favorite places to stay, eat, and more. But before you start scrolling, brace yourself – you’re about to feel a wanderlust like you wouldn’t believe.

paros

Photo by Victor Ovies Arenas/Moment/Getty Images

Why visit: Dr. Terika Haynes, owner of Dynamite trip, says she loves Paros in the Cyclades because it gives people options for their preferred vacation style. “Travelers can experience old Greek tradition in Lefkes or they can experience the beautiful waterfront views of the fishing village of Naoussa,” she told TZR.

What to do: If you feel like shopping or dining, Dr. Haynes advises you to head to Parikia. She also recommends Solo Gelato as a must-try on the island, and Hotel Yria as a great place to stay. And his last piece of advice? “The views from Lefkes are stunning, take your camera gear for some amazing photos.”

Antiparos

Why visit: Anne Lilès of The travel workshop calls Antiparos (a small island near Paros) a hidden gem: “exclusive, charming, with far fewer people”. As she describes it, “The main village of Charos is laid back with cobbled streets lined with bougainvillea, family restaurants and lots of charm. It’s also great for history buffs.

What to do: Liles says some of his favorite places in Antiparos include Rooster (a new 17-room luxury wellness resort), Boogaloo for cocktails, Lollo’s for pizza, and Despotiko Island. And, she says, “Don’t forget to explore the beautiful caves on the water.”

Patmos

Tuul & Bruno Morandi/The image bank/Getty Images

Why visit: Patmos in the Dodecanese group of islands is another favorite of Dr. Haynes for its natural beauty and charm. “It’s one of the smaller Greek islands, so I think it’s often overlooked due to its size.” However, she continues, it’s a great place to visit because it has a ton of history and feels incredibly safe. In fact, says Dr Haynes, locals “bring about being able to leave their homes open and unlocked without worry”.

What to do: While you’re there, be sure to soak up the history of St. John’s Cave and St. John’s Monastery. Dr. Haynes also recommends eating at The Patmiansand sleep at Petra. But just a warning before you start planning: “Due to the size of the island, travelers should plan to book their vacations at least a year in advance,” she says.

Anafi

Why visit: Dean Hayter, Senior Travel Curator at Origin, says his choice for an “unspoiled Greek refuge” is the island of Anafi in the Cyclades. “Only 1h30 from Santorini by ferry, it is a (pleasant) surprise that this island has not experienced the mass tourism of its neighbours.” To get there, he says you can take an 11-hour ferry from Athens, which explains why it’s “not an island that people will flock to in a hurry.” However, he continues, “it’s perfect to combine with Santorini and Mykonos for beginners to the Greek islands.” [who are] looking for something more intact. While it’s not for everyone due to its isolation and lack of activities, Hayter says that’s part of its charm.

What to do: According to Hayter, Anafi is a great island for hiking, “and you can camp for free on the beach where the local municipality has provided free facilities for campers such as showers on the beach.” Although if that’s not your jam it says the brand new hotel Ypseli Anafi Hive is “a lovely addition to the island near some of the best beaches, and I can’t wait to stay there!” As for the food? “My partner is Greek and loves octopus. Anemos is therefore an excellent restaurant for freshly grilled octopus at a good price.”

Corfu

David C Tomlinson/The Image Bank/Getty Images

Why visit: “One of Greece’s most stunning and historic islands with fewer crowds, Corfu is an unknown gem known for its cosmopolitan old town (listed on the UNESCO World Heritage List), spectacular sandy beaches and magnificent mountain ranges,” says Brandon Berkson, founder and editor of Hotels above par. “Its rich multicultural heritage blends significant influences – French, English and Venetian to name a few.”

What to do: By Berkson, don’t miss Banyan Tree Groupthe very first European property, Angsana Corfu Resort & Spa. It is “situated on an idyllic hilltop estate in the bay of Akra Punta in Corfu, near the village of Benitses”. You should also visit the Canal d’Amour, “where legend has it you’ll find your soul mate if you swim to its furthest tip!”

iOS

Courtesy of Calilo

Why visit: Calilo Hotel owner Angelos Michalopoulos calls Ios a “quiet retreat” among the Cyclades. “Hidden throughout the island, Ios has 36 private beaches, some accessible only by boat, ideal for those seeking complete privacy and island exploration.”

What to do: Of course, Michalopoulos recommends staying at Calilo at Papas Beach for your visit, which is tucked away in a remote and unspoilt corner of the island. “The beach is surrounded by dramatic cliffs and offers Calilo guests a private experience to swim, sunbathe, relax and align with nature.” What more could you need?

US announces additional $5.75 million in response to economic crisis in Sri Lanka

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Colombo: The United States on Tuesday announced more than $5 million in additional funding to cash-strapped Sri Lanka to meet the immediate needs of those hardest hit by the economic crisis in the island nation.

This new funding through the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) builds on last week’s announcement of $6 million in grants through USAID and $120 million in dollars in new loans through the Development Finance Corporation (DFC) to meet the needs of Sri Lankans during the economic crisis.

Sri Lanka is going through the worst economic crisis since its independence from Britain in 1948.

The US government on Tuesday announced the third tranche of new funding to address the immediate needs of those hardest hit by the economic crisis in Sri Lanka.

This humanitarian assistance, totaling $5.75 million, will provide cash assistance, short-term employment and agricultural supplies such as seeds directly to people affected by the crisis to meet their basic needs, the US Embassy in Sri Lanka said in a statement.

The recent UN appeal to international donors has warned of an ongoing multi-dimensional food security crisis in Sri Lanka, US Ambassador to Sri Lanka Julie Chung explained.

The new assistance we are announcing today will address some of these complex issues. We are working hard to ensure that these funds reach directly the Sri Lankans who have been hardest hit by this crisis.

The funding announced will also support micro-enterprises in communities that have traditionally experienced high poverty rates and are particularly affected by the crisis. Additionally, it will provide community disaster management committees to help prepare for, respond to, and ultimately recover from crises, the statement said.

Over the coming months, the United States plans to add to its significant ongoing investment and assistance projects in Sri Lanka that help the people of Sri Lanka meet their immediate and long-term needs.

These efforts build on six decades and more than $2 billion in foreign assistance from the American people that have strengthened tourism, small business, renewable energy, climate adaptation and civil society in Sri Lanka.

Sri Lanka is in talks with the International Monetary Fund (IMF) for an economic program that could be backed by the global lender’s loan deal for the country which is seeking to find $6 billion to keep it afloat for the next six coming months.

The IMF, however, laid down a number of conditions in order to agree to a bailout.

The country on the verge of bankruptcy, with an acute currency crisis that led to a default on external debt payments, announced in April that it was suspending the repayment of nearly $7 billion in external debt due for this year on about $25 billion due through 2026. the debt stands at $51 billion.

The economic crisis has led to severe shortages of essentials like food, medicine, cooking gas and other fuels, toilet paper and even matches, with Sri Lankans forced to queue for months for hours in front of stores to buy fuel and cooking gas.

Dendias informs EU counterparts of Turkish provocations

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BRUSSELS – Greek Foreign Minister Nikos Dendias briefed his EU Foreign Affairs Council counterparts on the escalating Turkish provocations during their meeting in Luxembourg on Monday, sources said. Greek diplomats.

The Greek minister noted that Turkey’s provocative actions have intensified both in rhetoric and on the ground.

Dendias also pointed to Turkey’s continued revisionism, which is expressed both in constant threats and in direct questioning of the sovereignty of the Greek islands, diplomatic sources added.

The Greek minister discussed in detail the recent Turkish overflights and violations near strategic points, such as the port of Alexandroupolis in northern Greece, as well as the instrumentation of migratory flows, particularly in the border region of Evros , where an increase in attempts to enter Greece is observed, it was added.

Dendias thanked those who have already condemned these actions, and he stressed that it is appropriate that all EU Member States underline their commitment to maintaining the inviolability of borders and respect for international treaties, in particular in the current difficult situation, it was underlined.

He also reiterated the need for a clear message regarding the European membership prospects of the Western Balkan countries, especially given Ukraine’s similar potential. Negotiations for Albania and North Macedonia’s EU membership should start immediately, Dendias also noted, after which Greece will continue to offer its technical know-how for this purpose.

Dendias concluded by saying that all his counterparts expressed concerns about energy and food security due to the war in Ukraine, and about the penetration of revisionist forces in the region. For these reasons, he added, accelerating the European prospects of the Western Balkan countries becomes even more imperative.

(ANA-MPA/I.Zarkadoula)

The Grecotel group opens a new hotel on the island of Corfu

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The Grecotel Group last week welcomed the first summer visitors to its new Grecotel Costa Botanica, its fourth property to open on the island of Corfu.

Located in Acharavi, 25 km from Corfu International Airport, the new luxury hotel covers an area of ​​3.5 hectares with a 1,000 meter long sandy beach along its coastal front.

The hotel complex has a total capacity of 401 rooms in his Villa and summer houses, and works with an all-inclusive hosting program. Grecotel Costa Botanica includes nine restaurants and barsthe Popolar Square, six swimming poolsa theatera 40,000 m². water parkthe donkey farmthe botanists laboratory, a Mini club for kids, sports facilities, as well as a 533sqm. spa center.

A short walk from the resort is the Antiniotis Lagoon, one of Corfu’s most impressive landscapes, with a diverse ecosystem that is home to over 90 species of migratory birds, rare turtles, the unique Corfiot otters, sand dunes with lilies, wild birds orchids, olive groves and impressive vegetation.

“Grecotel continues to grow steadily, enhancing Greek tourism by creating new hotels, combined with providing high quality services to Greek and foreign visitors,” said Grecotel Group CEO. Mari Daskalantonakis said.

With the addition of Grecotel Costa Botanica, the group has created an international holiday destination in Corfu, with the Imperial Corfuthe modernized five-star LUX ME Daphnila Bay Dassia and the luxurious Eva Palace. The Group also owns the Danilia Village cultural park, selected for the filming of major international film productions.

“Greek tourism requires top-quality investments that will add value to the country’s reputation, support local economies and create new jobs,” Daskalantonakis added.

The Nikos Daskalantonakis – Grecotel Group comprises a portfolio of 40 four and five star hotels in popular island and mainland destinations in Greece.


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Why a Greek villa is the top choice for a stress-free vacation

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Lying on a padded lounge chair, as the Mediterranean sun warms my skin, I hear the waves crashing on the shore behind me and the distant birdsong from the surrounding mulberry trees.

Called to explore, I leave the sun terrace and pass a sky-blue infinity pool, sliding through a pair of iron gates before tiptoeing along steps that cut through the wild grasses until I reach soft sand dunes.

I quickly realize that the area is deserted and that I have the beach all to myself. Happiness.

The villa has a large infinity pool with an unobstructed view of Apraos beach and the ocean (CV Villas/PA)

Apraos Beach House is part of a select group of residences with its own private access to Apraos Beach, a sandy bay located in Kalamaki, northeast Corfu. The sprawling villa is tucked away in a secluded corner of the beach, surrounded by lush greenery – and right now it’s my home away from home.

Despite the isolation, I don’t need to go looking for supplies, as the lavish property is fully staffed. Managed by CV Villas, the property is part of their ABOVE range, meaning it comes with a chef and housekeeping service.

As for sleeping arrangements, the main villa has six en-suite double bedrooms. Six other people can sleep in two annex buildings. Perfect for those wanting some privacy, a large building to the rear has its own lawn, living area and kitchen, and a double bedroom with en-suite. A separate refuge is tucked away next to the beach.

It’s a home-like luxury experience without the hassle. There’s no need to rush for dinner at set times or research decent local restaurants in the area, as we also have a concierge on hand for the duration of our stay. Requests are answered, restaurants booked for us, and local experiences arranged – giving us more time to relax and socialize together.

The exclusive property sleeps 16 and has plenty of space to socialize or relax alone (CV Villas/PA)

It’s easy to see why villa vacations are on the rise. Perfect for a post-pandemic break, these properties are ideal for multi-generational families looking to come together to spend some quality time together, or a great vacation for a special event.

CV Villas saw a 23% increase in additional bookings this year compared to 2019. Greece, in particular, is booming, with a 32% increase in bookings.

One evening, a chef cooks up a sumptuous three-course meal for me and my group of friends. We eat in the villa’s outdoor dining area, which houses a giant table that comfortably seats 16 people.

The villa has several large dining areas, perfect for groups to gather and enjoy alfresco dining (CV Villas/PA)

Then we head to the large sofas on the patio, as the sun sets over the sea. We can see Albania in the distance, shimmering in the half-light. The solitude of the villa allows us to laugh and chat until dawn, free to have fun without worrying about disturbing anyone.

What to do in Corfu?

As easy as it would be to spend your whole holiday relaxing in the villa, there is also plenty to explore nearby…Visit of the fishing village, Kassiopi

Soak up the scenery and explore the pretty fishing village of Kassiopi (Sophie Goodall/PA)

A 10-minute drive from Apraos Beach House is the small fishing village of Kassiopi. The old port is located in the heart of the city, extending in an arc to two small piers formed by piles of jagged rocks, which jut out into the water.

Limani Bar is the perfect breakfast stop, where you can start your day with crispy and sweet Corfiot tiganites (traditional Corfu pancakes) and cups of strawberry and mint soda, while watching the boats glide over the clear waters of the bay and schools of fish skim over the pebbles of the ocean floor.

The picturesque village of Afionas offers picture-perfect Greek scenery (Sophie Goodall/PA)

To explore the island further, a jeep safari (jeepsafaricorfu.com; from €95/£85 pp for a private day trip) will uncover many of North Corfu’s more difficult-to-reach gems. Hold on to your seat as you wind off the road through bumpy olive groves, the twisting ancient trees providing a cool canopy from the scorching sun. Visit places of natural beauty, such as the wild and untouched Crab Lake and the beautiful bay of Agios Georgios.

The tour will also take you to one of Corfu’s oldest villages – Afionas, an untouched and idyllic settlement, home to buildings in every color of the rainbow – before heading to Cape Drastis, a formation of hidden sea caves and white cliffs plunging into turquoise waters.

The Enotis Olive Oil Museum is an immersive experience in Corfu’s history (Sophie Goodall/PA)

Head to the Enotis Olive Oil Museum in Vistonas (enotis.gr), an elegant and upscale museum run by the Constantis family. Learn about the history of the mill, olive oil production and tree cultivation, and admire the tools and machinery of yesteryear.

Dip the bread in the unique spicy and peppery Enotis olive oil and taste the purple, small and misshapen Lianolia olives native to the region. Take home a bottle of oil (€25.90 / £22) as a souvenir, or pick up some natural oil-based soaps and skincare products.

How to plan your tripA seven-night stay at Apraos Beach House in Corfu starts from £1126.125 pp (16 shares). Book through CV Villas (cvvillas.com; 0203 993 6343).

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Why Casanova continues to seduce us

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My cock is so stiff it hurts;
The glans swarms and I can’t hold on;
It is as hard as a bone or a spike of iron;
At this moment, it bursts, at this moment, it springs.

Baffo accompanied Giacomo and his mother to Padua. During the trip, the boy noticed that the trees seemed to “walk” as the boat sailed. From this phenomenon, he deduces that “the sun does not move either, and it is we who roll from west to east”. His mother laughed at his “foolishness”, but Baffo, Casanova later boasted, was stunned: an uneducated nine-year-old had guessed at a theory of which the Vatican had a low opinion, heliocentrism. “Always draw logical conclusions from your reasoning,” he says, “and let the others laugh.

Casanova’s intellect was central to his sense of worth, and he believed it would have been stunted “by the cowardice of credulityif Baffo hadn’t come to his defense. The emphasis is hers, and she emphasizes a horror that generates drama in her life and work: of the credulity of fools; of himself as “a perfect dupe” of women; and a blind faith in authority, divine or temporal, reinforced by the fear of perdition. Enlightenment deism shaped Casanova’s philosophy and helped rationalize his predations. “Fools are those who think that the Supreme Being will never be able to benefit from the sorrow, pain and abstinence they offer him in sacrifice,” he wrote. “He never gave us anything except to make us happy.” But “History” contains the seed of a modern worry: that no link we hold sacred is reliable.

During three thousand five hundred pages, “History” has its lengths. But the first chapter is a marvel of psychological economy. All the seeds of the narrator’s character are planted there. The children of indifferent mothers grow up doubting their own existence; they can never satiate their voracity for love and approval. The charmless little boy becomes a flamboyant showboater. He dodges abandonment by escaping attachments. Each time he feels suffocated, he seeks a new climate.

Giacomo’s stay in Padua was among his longer stays in the same place. His grandmother rescued him from a vermin-infested boarding house where his landlady had starved him and took him in with a young priest, Antonio Gozzi, whom he would later remember with gratitude. Gozzi taught him Latin and nurtured his love of study, preparing him for a law degree. The clergyman also had a sister, Bettina, a beauty in her early teens. Bettina took care of the boy’s toilet. She gave him a sponge bath every morning – and his first erections.

Bettina’s trysts with an older man inflamed Giacomo’s jealousy, we are told in “History,” and she salted the wound with wayward teasing. One of his schemes was to dress him up as a girl so they could attend a ball together. Androgyny has always tickled Casanova; a few years later, in Ancona, he fell madly in love with “Bellino”, a young soprano of uncertain sex. Unlike Venice, the Papal States prohibited women from accessing their stages, so aspirants Divo— the daughter of a poor man — was being castrated using a prosthetic penis.

In 1742, at the age of sixteen, Casanova defended his thesis at the ancient University of Padua, having learned more about vice from his classmates than about right from his professors. He returned to Venice with a doctorate but also with a penchant for delinquency. Eventually, Zanetta, who was performing in Warsaw, asked for a favor. She arranged for her wayward son to become private secretary to a Franciscan monk who, through his machinations with the Queen of Poland, had been appointed to a bishopric in Calabria.

Casanova left cheerfully for southern Italy, expecting to live well there. Instead, he found himself in a squalid backwater among the “animals.” After three days in the service of the bishop, he decamped for Rome. Stopping in Naples, he met an aristocrat who also went by the name of Casanova and convinced him that they were related. His namesake endowed him with an expensive wardrobe.

“History” is quick to say that the author’s relationships with older men were often transactional. Rome, he notes dryly, “forces all mankind to become pederasts, but will not admit it.” Yet one of his most memorable seductions took place there. Her lover was a married woman, Donna Lucrezia Castelli, and their clandestine fornication, some of it outdoors, produced a child. Casanova would not discover the existence of his putative daughter Leonilda for about eighteen years, when he fucked her mother while she shared their bed. A decade later, he knocked out Leonilda as a favor, he claimed, to her helpless husband. Incest, he suggests, is a consummate delight: “I could never conceive how a father can tenderly love his lovely daughter without having slept with her at least once.

Plotted on a map of Europe, Casanova’s advances and retreats resemble those of Napoleon. During his travels, writes Damrosch, he traveled forty thousand miles. At twenty, he was back in Venice from Corfu, after serving in the Venetian army. Without any glamorous outlook, he plays the violin at weddings and at the theater where his parents met. Soon after, however, he was forced to flee La Serenissima after an alleged rape, not for the last time. He ended up in Paris, where he acquired a servant and frequented a notorious brothel. An Italian friend invites him to the opera house in Fontainebleau. Mme. de Pompadour, he claims, took it down from his box, and he entertained her with a little quirky wit in his stilted French. One of the many erotic discoveries in this chapter of his “apprenticeship” was a teenage beauty from a family of prostitutes, Marie-Louise O’Murphy. They didn’t go all the way, but Casanova commissioned a miniature of her, which is said to have inspired “Resting Girl,” François Boucher’s famous nude portrait. She seduces the King of France who adds Marie-Louise to his harem.

After various adventures in Prague and Vienna, Casanova returned to Venice in 1753, living in luxury as the “adopted son” of an elderly senator and cavorting with a beautiful nun, MM, who was herself a licentious prodigy. The Inquisition watched his game; on the pornographic poetry he wrote; on his rumored “devil worship”; and perhaps, suggests Damrosch, on his entanglement with a foreign diplomat, the illustrious Abbé de Bernis, his future facilitator at the court of France, with whom he shared the favors of MM.

In July 1755, unaware of the charges against him, Casanova was locked in a rat-infested cell in the Ducal Palace – an infamous attic prison whose tin roof gave it its name, the Leads. No one had ever escaped it, but he had resolved to do so. He improvised a chisel and used his bed to hide the progress of his excavations. But then he was transferred to another cell. As the months passed, his prospects for release seemed to dim. A fellow prisoner, a monk imprisoned for corruption of virgins, joins him. They drilled holes in their ceilings, and when they had pierced the roof, they climbed its mist-smooth slope. Casanova nearly plunged to his death after successfully breaking a window, but they gained access to an office suite. A guard who discovered them the next day assumed they were lost revelers. (Casanova had the foresight, he tells us, to bring a change of clothes: “my elegant coat,” a lace shirt, a feathered Spanish hat.) They left the palace by its grand staircase and rented a gondola that rows to freedom on the mainland.

The Knight dined on this story all over Europe and eventually published it as an illustrated chronicle which made him famous. WG Sebald is among the writers who have presented him as an enemy of censorship and despotism. He himself, however, casually told an admirer of Voltaire that “the Republic of Venice has acted justly”. After his banishment ended eighteen years later, he volunteered as an informant for the Inquisition, plying his basic trade under an alias.

The escapee heads for the City of Light where, in 1757, he pulls off his big hit in the French lottery and finds himself with a fortune to dissipate. (Gastronomy was one of his expensive passions.) Months later, he met the gullible Marquise and tapped into her obsession with the occult. When she finally understood his scam, she had him kicked out of France. He then tried his luck in the London of George III but, unable to speak English, he did not have much. He failed with an adventuress, and in 1764 had to flee England to avoid a possible death sentence for forgery.

Then there was Germany, where he failed to impress Boswell or the King of Prussia. His courtship of Empress Catherine proved equally useless. In Poland, King Stanisław tipped him two hundred ducats for reciting Horace – one of Casanova’s favorite festive tricks – although he later ordered him to leave Warsaw. (His misdeeds in Paris had caught up with him.) Florence expelled him, suspected of cheating at cards. He was driven out of Vienna and Madrid.

Two of his siblings were established in Dresden, where their mother, the great Buranella, was a retired idol. She and Giacomo had been estranged for decades, but he claims she was thrilled to see him. (He says nothing of his own feelings about seeing her.) She died in 1776, a year after Michele Grimani, and a year before Casanova returned to Gozzi, her former tutor, who was now archpriest in Padua . The ruined Bettina lived with her brother; her marriage to a “wretch” had left her “poor and unhappy.” She died a day after Giacomo arrived, as he sat by her bedside.

Age is not kind to those who live off their charms. At sixty, Casanova was compelled by misery to accept a modest sinecure as librarian of a Bohemian castle, owned by a noble admirer who was rarely in residence. He had lost his teeth, and his trusty steed no longer reared at his command. “Luck,” he wrote, had “become a stranger” to him. The servants, irritated by his pretensions, tormented him. So did a lifetime of venereal infections, which probably caused it.

Embilipitiya stationery newly restored to save dollars outings – The Island

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According to the weekly economic indicators published by the Central Bank of Sri Lanka.

The export unit value index increased by 11.6% (year-on-year) in April 2022, mainly due to higher prices recorded in industrial exports. The unit value index of imports in April 2022 increased by 24.4% (year-on-year), due to the increase in prices mainly recorded in intermediate goods.

Meanwhile, the purchasing managers’ indices for manufacturing and services activities indicated subdued performance in May 2022 on a monthly basis, registering index values ​​of 50.3 and 42.4, respectively.

During the period under review (from 11.06.2022 to 17.06.2022), crude oil prices showed a mixed performance. Early in the period, crude oil prices rose on data indicating lower OPEC production. However, prices then fell on fears of lower demand after the Federal Reserve raised interest rates significantly. Overall, during the review period, Brent and WTI prices declined by US$0.73 per barrel and US$1.70 per barrel, respectively.

Some other key indicators are as follows: The weekly AWPR for the week ending June 17, 2022 decreased by 33 basis points to 21.27% from the previous week. Broad money (M2b) increased by 20.0%, on an annual basis, in April 2022 . Net credit to government from the banking system increased by Rs. 4.6 billion in April 2022*. Outstanding loans to public enterprises increased by Rs. 177.2 billion in April 2022.

The outstanding amount of loans extended to the private sector increased by Rs. 219.3 billion in April 2022. The sharp depreciation of the Sri Lankan rupee since March 2022 remains the main reason for the increase in monetary and credit aggregates in rupees in March 2022 and April 2022. The reserve currency rose from the previous week mainly due to increased deposits held by commercial banks with the Central Bank. The total outstanding market liquidity was a deficit of Rs. 629.002 billion by the end of this week, compared to a deficit of Rs. 680.836 billion at the end of last week.

Baggage chaos at Heathrow Airport baggage claim after ‘technical glitch’

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British tourists flying abroad from the country’s busiest airport are facing huge disruption as the aviation industry continues to struggle. Photos of hundreds of abandoned suitcases at Heathrow Airport illustrate the pressure airports continue to face.

Thousands of travelers leaving the UK from Heathrow’s Terminal 2 have been separated from their luggage due to a ‘malfunction’ in the terminal’s baggage system. An airport spokesperson said the issue had been resolved but some travelers had to leave without their luggage.

The disruption is the latest in a long string of problems at airports across the country in recent months. A surge in demand has followed the end of many travel restrictions put in place due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Read more: M4 closures near Heathrow this weekend

The problem has worsened across the country thanks to recent mid-term school holidays and the four-day bank holiday weekend for the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee. A number of travelers have spoken out about the “frustration” they face when trying to vacation abroad.

A Heathrow Airport spokesperson said: “Yesterday there was a technical issue with the Terminal 2 baggage system which has now been resolved. Passengers can now check in as normal, but some number of passengers who left Terminal 2 yesterday may have traveled without their luggage.

“We are working closely with airlines to reunite passengers with their luggage as soon as possible. We are sorry that there have been disruptions to passenger travel.”



Luggage was seen lining the airport terminal

The scene was recorded by Sky News defense and security correspondent Deborah Haynes as she left Heathrow’s Terminal 2 after an early evening arrival from Brussels, the Mirror reported. She said: “The warning signs that all was not well were clear when collecting baggage.

“There were clusters of ownerless suitcases clustered around various conveyor belts.” It comes as the aviation industry suffers from a staff shortage after letting thousands of people go during the coronavirus pandemic.

Nicole Venglovicova, 31, has missed three separate flights to Belfast from Heathrow and is worried she won’t get a refund for around £500 she spent trying to sort out air travel. She said: “I had a seizure, I was crying outside the airport from the stress.”

Ms Venglovicova, a freelance video producer from London, told reporters: “I arrived at the airport for my morning flight and Flybe told me the queue was huge so I have to run. When I I finally made it through security, my boarding pass didn’t work…the door was still open at this point.”

As Ms Venglovicova returned to reception to explain the problems with her boarding pass, staff ‘started arguing with security’. By the time she was able to get back to her door, it was locked and no one was there.

“The problem I had was that they should have told me that I would miss my flight because of the queue and would (have) immediately booked a later flight to continue. But instead of this they sent me back to security and made me i missed my flight and i had to go through arrivals and get my luggage which they didn’t even put on the plane. “

Collecting her bags and going through security took Ms Venglovicova an additional two hours, meaning she missed two other flights she could have taken to Belfast. “I thought I (could) have the one in the afternoon, then I saw the queue was going all the way to the parking lot and I couldn’t see the end of it,” she said .

“Then I had a nervous breakdown and just went home. No point. A domestic flight to Belfast and when do I have to get to the airport? Eight hours early?”

Read more

Vrbo Reveals Top 10 European Vacation Homes of the Year for 2022 – How to Book for Summer

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Summer holidays can be stressful – especially when you have young children – but Vrbo is here to save the day by revealing its 2022 European vacation homes of the year.

Whether it’s your first getaway with your little one or whether you’re looking for an unforgettable breakthese best properties are located in some of today’s most sought-after destinations.

The best family homes can be found in sunny places like Greece, Spain and Portugal as well as closer to home here in the UK.

European Holiday Homes of the Year 2022. 1 credit

“We know that every family – or whoever you call it family – has their own unique needs and preferences, so in addition to meeting high quality standards, this list of vacation homes also includes a variety of property types in destinations. popular Europeans,” said Karen Mullins. of Vrbo.

Ms Mullins added: “Whether you prefer a beachfront home, a chalet in the mountains, a country mansion or a cottage, you can have an amazing stay at one of our European Vacation Homes of the Year.

Prepare your passports, here 10 family properties you can fly away for summer vacation.

Vrbo reveals its European holiday homes of the year 2022

Modern villa with stunning sea view, swimming pool, Jaccuzi – Bretagne, France

Times Series: Modern Villa with Stunning Sea Views, Pool, Jaccuzi - Brittany, France.  1 creditModern Villa with Stunning Sea Views, Pool, Jaccuzi – Bretagne, France. 1 credit

Sleeps: 6

Bedrooms: 4

Bathrooms: 3

Special features: Outdoor swimming pool on the south terrace, sea view, jacuzzi, free WiFi, near port and town

Medium cost per night: £361

Book a stay through the Vrbo website.

Villa San Piero: Perfect Holiday in Chianti with Pool, Views, Privacy – Tuscany, Italy

Times Series: Villa San Piero: the perfect Chianti holiday with pool, views, privacy - Tuscany, France.  1 creditVilla San Piero: perfect vacation in Chianti with pool, views, privacy – Tuscany, France. 1 credit

Sleeps: 10

Bedrooms: 5

Bathrooms: 5

Special features: Garden planted with olive trees, saltwater infinity pool, barbecue loggia, exclusive access to the Villa with chapel, pizza oven, private chef and driver, cooking class with private chef

Average cost per night: £589

Book a stay through the Vrbo website.

Superb modern design villa located on the mountain in a unique location, terraces and swimming pool – Mallorca, Spain

Times series: Superb modern design villa located on the mountain in a unique location, with terraces and swimming pool - Mallorca, Spain.  1 creditSuperb modern design villa located on the mountain in a unique location, terraces and swimming pool – Mallorca, Spain. 1 credit

Sleeps: 6

Bedrooms: 3

Bathrooms: 3

Special features: Free Wifi, private saltwater pool, barbecue, parking, near the sea and the golf course

Medium cost per night: £566

Book a stay through the Vrbo website.

Fantastic villa with heated pool, air conditioning, free wifi – Algarve, Portugal

Times Series: Fantastic villa with heated pool, air conditioning, free wifi - Algarve, Portugal.  1 creditFantastic villa with heated pool, air conditioning, free wifi – Algarve, Portugal. 1 credit

Sleeps: 13

Bedrooms: 5

Bathrooms: 5

Special features: Air conditioning, free WiFi, large heated outdoor swimming pool, traditional Algarve barbecue

Medium cost per night: $457

Book a stay through the Vrbo website.

Exquisite family villa with spectacular ocean views and heated infinity pool – Corfu, Greece

Times Series: Exquisite family villa with spectacular ocean views and heated infinity pool - Corfu, Greece.  1 creditExquisite family villa with spectacular ocean views and heated infinity pool – Corfu, Greece. 1 credit

Sleeps: 6

Bedrooms: 3

Bathrooms: 3

Special features: Barbecue area with stone gazebo, private terrace, all rooms have balconies, air conditioning, outdoor heated infinity pool, Nespresso machine and boat rental available.

Medium cost per night: $201

Book a stay through the Vrbo website.

Trullo Santo Stefano – Vacation rental with pool – San Michele Salentino, Puglia, Italy

Times Series: Trullo Santo Stefano - Vacation Rental with Pool - San Michele Salentino, Puglia, Italy.  1 creditTrullo Santo Stefano – Vacation rental with pool – San Michele Salentino, Apulia, Italy. 1 credit

Sleeps: 7

Bedrooms: 3

Bathrooms: 2

Special features: free WiFi, swimming pool, pets allowed, outdoor shower, covered terrace, wood-burning oven, fruit trees and barbecue

Medium cost per night: £347

Book a stay through the Vrbo website.

Waldhaus. Elegant half-timbered house + barrel sauna – Rieste, Germany

Times Series: Waldhaus.  Barrel sauna in elegant half-timbered house - Rieste, Germany.  1 creditWaldhaus. Barrel sauna in elegant half-timbered house – Rieste, Germany. 1 credit

Sleeps: 8

Bedrooms: 4

Bathrooms: 3

Special features: Pets accepted, parking, hot tub, free WiFi and fireplace

Medium cost per night: £155

Book a stay through the Vrbo website.

Villa Arbanessa with heated pool – Trogir, Croatia

Times Series: Villa Arbanessa with heated pool - Trogir, Croatia.  1 creditVilla Arbanessa with heated pool – Trogir, Croatia. 1 credit

Sleeps: 8

Bedrooms: 3

Bathrooms: 3

Special features: heated swimming pool, 10 meters from the beach, jacuzzi, sea view and animals accepted

Medium cost per night: £396

Book a stay through the Vrbo website.

Chalet Xel-Ha **** 180° view, wood stove, bubble sauna in the garden. – Haute-Savoie, France

Times Series: Chalet Xel-Ha **** 180° view, wood stove, bubble sauna in the garden.  - Haute-Savoie, France.  1 creditChalet Xel-Ha **** 180° view, wood stove, bubble sauna in the garden. – Haute-Savoie, France. 1 credit

Sleeps: 11

Bedrooms: 4

Bathrooms: 3

Special features: South-facing terrace, table football, free WiFi, sauna and swimming pool

Medium cost per night: £387

Book a stay through the Vrbo website.

Exceptional North Norfolk Property – Norfolk, UK

Times Series: Exceptional North Norfolk Property - Norfolk, UK.  1 creditExceptional North Norfolk property – Norfolk, UK. 1 credit

Sleeps: 8

Bedrooms: 4

Bathrooms: 4

Special features: Pets accepted, fireplace, free WiFi, underfloor heating, landscaped garden, Smart TV and Sky, desk, table football, restored ruins of a romantic Gothic chapel.

Medium cost per night: £765

Book a stay through the Vrbo website.

Education encouraged for BC businesses in fight against bogus invoices – North Island Gazette

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The fight against counterfeit currency in Canada has come a long way over the past 20 years.

According to Bank of Canada (BoC) statistics, 2004 was the peak season for counterfeiters, with 470 counterfeit notes for every million genuine notes in circulation. It cost the economy $13 million.

“We were probably one of the highest of the G7 groups,” said BoC analyst Farid Salji.

Speaking at a Kelowna RCMP fraud session sponsored by the Uptown Rutland Businesses Association, Salji said several measures have been put in place to combat counterfeiting. They included closer collaboration with law enforcement, the design of new state-of-the-art notes and public education campaigns.

This only resulted in seven fake bills for one million real tickets in 2021, which weighed on the economy $873,000. However, counterfeiters have kept pace.

“We used to develop a new set of notes every 15 years,” Salji explained. “But with technology doubling or tripling every year and becoming so much easier to use, what we’re doing now is a rolling schedule.”

That means the Bank of Canada issues a new note every few years for the next generation, he added. Salji’s advice to business owners trading in cash is to educate themselves and their employees and be careful.

“We have materials designed for everyone, and everything is absolutely free,” he said. You can go to our website and order whatever you want. The onus is on people to actually pay attention.

Salji pointed out that all denominations are counterfeited, but counterfeiters don’t always do the highest quality work. If you are presented with a counterfeit note, his advice is to politely decline it; ask for another note; refer the person to the police; or contact the police yourself.

You can find more information about fake banknotes and real banknotes on the Bank of Canada website.


@GaryBarnes109
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Mayors of 42 small Greek islands meet Prime Minister on development prospects

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ATHENS — Forty-two mayors from some of Greece’s least populated islands met Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis at the Maximos Mansion on Wednesday.

They discussed their collaboration with the government, as well as the implementation and progress of ongoing programs in these islands.

Although each of the 42 islands has a permanent population of less than 5,000, “they receive in total almost 500 million euros in funding from national programs for municipalities and also from NSRF resources”, noted the Prime Minister. . The breakdown of the 482.5 million euros includes 232.6 million euros from the Ministry of the Interior and 249.9 million euros from the programs of other ministries (including 128.7 million euros from the funds of CRSN).

The Greek state “must continuously strengthen our islands with new infrastructure, with new jobs for young people, improving public transport as well as local health and education facilities,” Mitsotakis added. Accomplishing their green transition will provide small islands in particular with a great comparative advantage, he stressed.

However, the Greek Prime Minister stressed that European, regional and national programs will need the active support of mayors and local authorities, “otherwise they will never take shape”.

Some of the issues noted by the mayors included lack of adequate medical staff and facilities, as well as shipping and energy issues.

Mitsotakis announced that enough additional financial resources will be allocated from the Recovery Fund, while a new fund called “Nearchos” will focus on local projects related to water networks, desalination plants, construction of ports and renewable energy sources.

Mum, 36, died from the third floor balcony while her children waited in the car to leave on vacation

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A mum has died from 50ft in a tragic accident while her two children were waiting in the car to leave on vacation.

Janetina, 36, reportedly went back to get another bag from their apartment, only to find the door jammed.

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The mother died from 50ft while her children waited for her in the carCredit: Unknown, clear with photo office
The building where Janetina fell

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The building where Janetina fellCredit: Unknown, clear with photo office

So she asked her neighbor if she could jump on her balcony and pass by.

She is believed to have slipped between third floor balconies and landed in a courtyard behind a block in the Pagrati district of Athens, Greece.

Neighbors said the mother-of-two was set to leave with her children to join her husband in Naxos on Monday evening.

She packed all their bags, then her children aged five and two got into the car with an aunt, reports Proto Thema.

A British mother raped in Corfu while a
Caroline Crouch's husband ATTACKED as he rots in jail for Brit murder

Then she realized she had forgotten a child’s bag and went back up to the third floor.

She found she couldn’t open the door and was anxious not to delay the trip, according to reports.

She rang her neighbour’s bell and asked to come up from her balcony to his.

The mum had jumped between balconies several times before without difficulty, neighbors said.

This time, however, she slipped on a loose tile and fell 50 feet, reports local site iefimerida.

An ambulance took her to the hospital but she could not be saved.

Neighbors told local television of their shock after the tragedy left two children without a mother.

Friends also posted tributes on social media.

Comments lamented the “tragedy of fate” and “the mistake that cost him his life”.

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Families from the Greek Islands in Greece visit for their holidays

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Greece has been a popular destination for British holidaymakers for decades. Its many islands offer a wide range of unforgettable adventures, gorgeous beaches and breathtaking views.

With summer holidays fast approaching, there is no doubt that many families will be flying to different parts of Greece. However, Greek families who don’t want to holiday abroad tend to visit their own set of destinations in order to avoid tourists.

As The Times reports, the general rule for Greek travelers is to avoid Mykonos, Rhodes or Corfu. It’s obvious that a Brit would want to visit one of these islands, but for locals it’s more about tapping into childhood memories and nostalgic rituals.

Read more: Greece travel update as covid rules change

It would be very similar to UK holidays, with many Brits often traveling to the same UK holiday spots because of the memories made there. Their local knowledge is also likely to uncover many hidden gems unknown to foreign visitors.

Here are the five islands most visited by Greek families on vacation.

Folegandros



Folegandros in the Cyclades has just been named the second best place in Europe for an island getaway.

A small Greek island in the Aegean Sea, Folegandros is sandwiched between Santorini and Paros, both of which are much busier than their smaller neighbor. As a result, the island that forms the southern part of the Cyclades, along with Sikinos, Ios, Anafi and Santorini, has largely escaped international tourism.

With around 765 inhabitants, it is only accessible by boat and attracts locals from Athens who allow their children to run freely around the picturesque island. The impressive Church of Panagia overlooks the town of Chora and can be reached with a 15-minute zigzag walk up the hill.

Much of the island offers a rural outlook, and it’s not uncommon to come across a bather next to a donkey on a deserted beach.

Tinos



Greeks flock to Tinos every year
Greeks flock to Tinos every year

Tinos is also in the Cyclades archipelago, whose nearest islands are Andros, Delos and Mykonos. Much of its area, which spans 194,464 square kilometers, is made up of beautiful mountain villages and sandy beaches.

During the otherwise hectic summer, Tinos is a calming alternative, with many ancient windmills found in its vast countryside. Traditional Greek food can be purchased in the many taverns.

It is one of the most religious islands in Greece, with many festivities taking place across the island each summer on August 15, when the Virgin Mary is celebrated.

Andros

About 3 km north of Tinos is the better known Andros. Greeks love to flock here as it is an example of a vacation spot determined by family history.

Due to an abundance of fresh water, it is much greener than its neighbours, containing forests and fields of wildflowers. The beaches of Andros are enough to warrant a visit on their own, with all the other features of the island an added bonus.

Palaiopolis, the ancient capital of Andros is a must visit with the Museum of Modern Art, the Archaeological Museums and the Cycladic Olive Museum all offering insight into the culture of the island.

Syros



The beautiful island of Syros
The beautiful island of Syros

Located 78 nautical miles southeast of Athens, Syros is easily accessible from the country’s capital and attracts educated Greeks. Another place that takes on a quiet atmosphere, it is ideal for those looking for a less crowded destination.

Popular among families and couples, many hours could be spent admiring the spectacular scenery. Contrary to the stereotype of the Greek islands, this is not the place to go if you expect exceptional beaches. Instead, its colorful mansions, neoclassical buildings and imposing Orthodox churches create a picture-postcard landscape.

The capital, Ermoupolis, contains the City Hall building, the Apollo Theater and the Pallas Cinema, while also boasting Venetian beauty.

Sithonia

Rather than an island, Sithonia is on the mainland north of Greece. In the midst of a three-pronged region, some of the most sought-after local delicacies are devoured by Greeks in the region’s taverns.

This unique place in Halkidiki has immense natural beauty as pine trees meet sandy beaches and fishing villages. Whole days can be devoted to relaxation and discovering all its secrets.

A possible accommodation option is Stay the Danaia five-star luxury resort in Nikiti, with huge rooms and villas amid vibrant gardens.

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Dean Black holds a big cash advantage in HD 15 Primary

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black dean to the most prominent mentions so far, and he continues his financial advantage in the House District 15 Republican primary that will likely determine who will represent Nassau County — and parts of Western Duval — in the next House session.

Black, chairman of the Duval County Republican Party, received $13,350 in May while spending about $5,747, ending the month with about $104,554.

Black faces a military veteran Emilie Nunez from Yulee in Primary. She received endorsements from the former United States Representative. Ted Yohostate representative. Antoine Sabatini and former national security adviser Michael Flynna notable supporter of the QAnon conspiracy theory.

She raised $2,040 in May, but spent more than she brought in, doling out around $3,008 and entering June with around $26,022 in hand.

Most of Black’s dollars over the past month have come from committees, including $1,000 donations from Accountability in Government, Building Florida’s Future, Fight for Florida, The Florida Accountability Fund, Libertatem, Sunshine Leadership and the Sunshine State Freedom. fund.

Other notable contributions came from Jacksonville Fraternal Order of Police ($1,000), The Fiorentino Group ($500), Nassau County Tax Collector John Drew ($250) and Greg Cookgeneral manager of the Ritz-Carlton on Amelia Island ($250).

The expenses included $2,320 to On Target Messaging of Jacksonville, consulting Alexander Pantinakis solidify; $2,255 to Agility Press, Printing and Mail of Jacksonville; and four payments totaling approximately $1,164 to Winning Concepts USA of Orange Park.

His political committee, True Conservatives, received no new contributions last month, but gave $11,750 in three separate installments to On Target Messaging. The real Tories have about $163,848 on hand.

Most of Nunez’s contributions were in small amounts, but included $100 from the lawyer Myriam Hillcommissioner of the port of Fernandina Ocean Highway and Port Authority. The largest donation to Nunez in May was $500 from Geoff Knowel from Orange Park.

His expenses included about $1,772 to South Lake Quick Print of Clermont and two payments totaling about $736 to Evans Marketing of Jacksonville.

Written candidate Jerry Steckloff recently qualified, making Primary a closed primary. Democrat Tammyette Thomas must still file a monthly disclosure report or qualify for election.


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A third of the world’s cruise ships will visit Greece this year

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Nearly a third of the world’s cruise liners will operate in Greece this year, according to the Cruise Lines International Association, whose representatives at Posidonia 2022 also hailed the Greek government’s commitment to the goal of zero carbon emissions and the objective of developing alternative marine fuels.

Greece’s upgraded role as a premier cruise destination is also confirmed by this year’s figures for the country, CLIA noted in a statement: of the 279 cruise ships of member airlines of the CLIA worldwide, 87 will operate in Greece this year, of which 47 will be based in the country. It’s a trend that began amid the pandemic, when Greece led the resumption of cruising, but continues with the same momentum, CLIA pointed out.

“2022 is the year we return to pre-pandemic levels in terms of the number of operating cruise ships, while in 2023 we expect to surpass 2019 passenger numbers,” said Maria Deligianni, Country Manager CLIA in the Eastern Mediterranean. “Especially for Greece, we expect a significant increase in cruise ship calls from this year. A total of 25 different cruise lines will visit the country this year, more than ever before,” she said. declared.

Marie-Caroline Laurent, CLIA’s Managing Director in Europe, attended Posidonia and met with shipping industry leaders, with discussions focusing on the green agenda.

“We were very pleased to hear Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis and Minister of Maritime Affairs Ioannis Plakiotakis supporting the industry’s transition to a new era of zero carbon emissions, but also highlighting the need to develop and supply marine fuels as well as the development of adequate marine fuels infrastructure, which are essential to our vision of net zero carbon cruising by 2050,” said Laurent.

“Of course, CLIA’s sustainability goals go beyond net zero carbon emissions. Cruising is an integral part of sustainable tourism, especially in Greece, which is a leading cruise destination, and we are committed to further supporting the sustainable development of the sector. To achieve this, we partnered with local and port authorities to assess the sustainability status of the municipalities of Corfu and Iraklio and to develop a plan for a sustainable tourism future. And we are expanding this effort to other destinations in Greece as it develops as a premier cruise destination,” she added.

Greece cannot fill 215,000 open jobs in construction, tourism and IT

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ATHENS — More than 215,000 jobs in Greece — 55,000 of them in tourism — are begging with not enough workers to fill them or avoiding low-paying, backbreaking positions to find other work.

The New Democracy government is counting on tourism, which brings in 18-20% of the annual gross domestic product (GDP) of 191.41 billion euros ($200.3 billion) to fuel a recovery during the COVID pandemic -19.

Sanitary measures were eased to essentially be scrapped in a bid to attract more foreign visitors as the season got off to an early start, showing signs of a big year with many Greeks ironically unable to afford domestic travel.

Although there are not enough staff such as cleaners, waiters, waitresses and chefs for hotels, bars, restaurants and taverns in tourist areas, the construction sector also does not find more workers as projects return, Kathimerini said.

At least 160,000 workers are needed for the construction and technical sectors – there are not enough scientists and IT people – according to the report, employers are frustrated that they cannot fill the jobs.

The tourism industry is so concerned that it has asked the government to allow pensioners who are not allowed to work – as well as teachers on summer leave – to be allowed to work in tourism jobs without penalty.

The head of the Technical Chamber of Greece (TEE), Giorgos Stasinos, told the newspaper that more than 10,000 additional engineers and more than 50,000 additional craftsmen were needed, while the number of additional workers required exceeded 100,000 people.

“We have before us a huge challenge, unique in history, volume and quantity – that is, public and private projects that must be implemented in just a few years,” he said. declared. “But the construction industry has lost a lot of its core resources in recent years: people with the knowledge, experience and skills to implement all these projects.”

The Greek Tourism Confederation estimates that of the 250,000 jobs needed by Greek hotels, more than 50,000 of all specialties remain vacant after earlier reports it reached 55,000.

Tourist companies offer higher wages, but this cannot offset the cost workers would face living on the islands for the summer, and the government has to deal with the poor image of Mykonos with reports that visitors are scammed and no attempt to stop this.

CASA Cycling Tour to Support Children’s Mental Health Comes to Nanaimo – Nanaimo News Bulletin

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CASA’s Child, Adolescent and Family Mental Health Riders travel the island to raise awareness and money to support children’s mental health.

CASA provides mental health treatment and services to families with children and youth ages 3-18, in a variety of therapy programs, support groups and educational settings in Alberta. The cycling tour runs until June 19 and is one of two western Canadian cycling tours supporting the cause this month, a press release said.

“Vancouver Island is special to CASA and its supporters,” said Nadine Samycia, CASA Donor Love Manager, according to the press release. “In 2014, a group of cyclists rode nearly 2,000 kilometers from Masset to Edmonton, raising money for a children’s hospital and delivering a totem pole carved by renowned Haida artist and cyclist Ben Davidson.

Samycia said the cyclists befriended Davidson and began an annual journey to support CASA and children’s mental health. Davidson designed a modern totem for CASA in 2019 and planned an epic Vancouver Island adventure tour in 2020 that was postponed by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Davidson died suddenly in August 2020 at his home in Haida Gwaii, the news release said.

This year, 18 cyclists are finally riding the route planned in memory of Davidson, the press release said. They will be on the road for a week, traveling the Island and Discovery Islands, from Cumberland to Quadra and Cortes Islands, Port Renfrew and Victoria in support of CASA services.

Peter O’Brien cycles through the Vancouver Island and southern Alberta legs of the tour in memory of his late wife, Rachel.

“Rachel’s journey with melanoma and immunotherapy has given us seven years since her diagnosis,” O’Brien said in the press release. “It’s the difference between our youngest child being 14 when she lost her mother and being 21. When I think about what it would have been like for my 14-year-old, I can’t tell. prevent from thinking that we would need to lean heavily on CASA for help.I will continue to help in any way I can to support the cause.

The tour arrives in Nanaimo on Wednesday, June 15, having cycled from Quadra Island. He leaves Nanaimo for Lake Cowichan and Port Renfrew on Thursday June 16th.

To learn more or to donate, visit www.casaservices.org.


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A team of 18 cyclists travels the island and the Gulf Islands to raise funds to support children’s mental health. (Photo submitted)

Avoid the chaos at Dublin Airport with these alternative holiday ideas – The Irish Times

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pass through

As the beleaguered Dublin Airport fights back – or rather, the besieged people fight through Dublin Airport – set your sights on Ireland’s regional airports for a quick and relatively easy getaway. Sunway has departures from Cork to the Costa del Sol, from Shannon to Corfu and Malta, and from Knock to the Algarve. You can even get to Benidorm via Kerry. Prices for last-minute trips range from €585 pps for seven nights on the Costa del Sol, and it’s just a euro more for the trip to the Algarve, both departing on June 14; sunway.fr. Head to the Canaries from Cork with Cassidy Travel, from €516pp for seven nights in Lanzarote, departing June 25; cassidytravel.ie. Or head north to go south with seven nights in Fuerteventura from £709 (€830) pps, departing Belfast on June 29; clickandgo.com.

Sail on

Learn to navigate and you may never have to worry about airports again. The latest cool voyage with Rubicon 3 Adventure takes you on a 12-day learn-to-sail vacation, departing from the Faroe Islands to Arctic Norway. It takes you right into the Arctic Circle, while learning great things like celestial navigation, setting sails, and exactly what a spinnaker does. You will be part of a crew of nine and no experience is necessary. The June 27 departure comes with a nice £900 discount, or £1,499 (€1,637) all-inclusive. Flights (via Paris) extra; rubicon3adventure.com.

Townhouse in the countryside

Continuing my informal quest to find the finest guesthouse in Ireland, I was delighted to discover Lucy O’Sullivan’s Bridge Street Townhouse in Kenmare. A beautiful spot on the river, it’s packed with contemporary crafts, artwork, antiques and eclectic treasures, all put together in style. And Oh! the breakfasts! A natural host, O’Sullivan is a wealth of information to set guests on the right path for new adventures, but you might find you’ll never want to leave. B&B from €150 per room per night; bridgestreettownhouse.com.

get to the point

If time permits, why would you want to leave Ireland? Ok, so that’s a big “if”, but following the wisdom that there is no bad weather, just dress badly, say hell and head to Donegal. Harvey’s Point offers a five-night retreat, which begins with Sunday lunch and continues with B&B in a lakeside suite, with dinner included on three of the nights of your stay.

Donegal has 12 Blue Flag beaches, and other activities include sea rock climbing with Iain Miller (or you can always settle in for a quieter picnic), so you’ll have plenty of leeway to do it all again. Five nights from €799 pps; harveyspoint.com.

10 Greek islands to consider for your very first time there

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Greece has stunning natural beauty, but there are more treasured attractions that are more magnificent than their magnificent homeland. In particular, the islands are special and mostly feature pristine beaches, beautiful waters and glorious weather. With summer fast approaching, new travelers to Greece likely have its scenic islands on their to-do list. While the country is packed with 6,000 islands, only a few would be suitable for beginners. The best part about these islands is that every traveler has something unique to experience; be it nightlife, outdoor activities, charming towns or sandy beaches. Here are the 10 Greek islands to consider for your very first time there.



Related: You only need a weekend to visit this underrated Greek island

ten Santorini: the most famous island

If travelers could only visit one of the many Greek islands, Santorini would be the first choice. The island has it all – from picturesque black lava sand beaches to breathtaking hilltop whitewashed villages and vibrant traditional culture. On this island, travelers will discover calm seas, tasty wines and active volcanoes to explore. No one would visit Greece for the first time and be sure to include this beautiful wine island in their itinerary. Fortunately, most Greek cruises, those that are planned, visit Santorini.

  • Best time to explore:
    june and september

  • High season in Santorini:
    January, November and December

  • The cheapest month to visit the island:
    October

Related: Athens to Santorini: 10 things to see along the way

9 Naxos: Ideal For Windsurfing And Kitesurfing

While Santorini is Greece’s most famous island, some travelers, for whatever reason, may not like the island. If that happens, don’t hesitate to head to Naxos, another beautiful island with so much to offer. A splendid breeze is guaranteed on the west coast, making this island a perfect destination for kitesurfing and other water sports. It is also an ideal vacation spot for couples, thanks to the romantic Portara sunset. Some of the world class beaches on this island include Plaka and Aliko.

  • Best time to visit:
    december and february

  • High season in Naxos:
    January, February and December

  • Cheapest month to visit:
    January

8 Mykonos: best known for its picturesque windmills

Sometimes referred to as the party island, Mykonos bustles with energy with several dance clubs and beach music attracting thousands of travelers each summer. The island’s picturesque windmills and town centers are the most popular tourist attractions. Apart from the perfect nightlife on this beautiful island, travelers can experience its stunning sandy beaches and spend their nights in the many luxury hotels set up in the area. This island is not the ideal place to discover good cuisine or dine by the sea because the food offered here lacks diversity. There’s not much to explore when it comes to food.

  • Ideal for :
    Luxury hotels, parties and sandy beaches

  • Best time to visit:
    september and october

  • Cheapest times to visit:
    April, May and October

seven Corfu: ideal for foodies

Although Mykonos is not an ideal island destination for dining, Corfu is ideal for food lovers. Many travelers visit Greece and the food is a key factor in their decision to explore the country. Typical dishes abound in most of the Greek islands, but one of the perfect places to taste excellent cuisine is Corfu. Mainly influenced by Mediterranean, English and Italian cuisine, local Corfu dishes include sofritewhich is usually a beef dish, cooked with lots of garlic and onion. Porpetas, cooked in the source of tomato, is an Italian-style meatball and is a dish not to be missed in Corfu.

  • Best time to visit:
    April-May, September-November

  • Cheapest month to visit:
    End of October to end of April

  • High season:
    July to August

6 Milos: picturesque beaches and incredible volcanic landscape

Milos is one of the most interesting islands in Greece and has become increasingly popular over the years, thanks to its amazing beaches, beautiful towns, great food and amazing volcanic landscape. This island is perfect for a week’s vacation as there is so much to explore. Those looking for nightlife should not opt ​​for this island. Although Milos has a few bars and small clubs, they are not really made for partying.

  • Best suited for
    amazing beaches, food, beautiful hotels and quaint little towns

  • Best time to visit:
    Late spring and early fall

  • Cheapest visit period:
    January-April, September 10 to December 9

5 Kefalonia: the largest of the Ionian Islands

Kefalonia is the most diverse island in Greece, naturally, with flourishing green landscapes, which can only be found in its surroundings, and on no other island. Its beaches are breathtaking, the waters are crystal clear and there are impressive underground caves to discover. This island is not only the largest of the Ionian Islands, but it is also one of the most beautiful. Almost every traveler has probably seen this island somewhere on Instagram or on postcards. What they don’t know is that the beauty of this place is better than any camera could capture. It looks better in reality than in some photos.

  • Best time to visit:
    June August

  • Cheapest visit period:
    June

4 Crete: the largest island in Greece

As a historic place, with a rich culture and history dating back millennia, Crete has a lot to offer. From medieval towns to historic towns, to ancient sites, there is so much to explore. However, the island is mostly visited as one of the most spectacular in the world. The likes of Elafonissi, Balos and Falassarna top the list. Travelers have every reason to visit and explore this beautiful island.

  • Best time to visit:
    Mid-May-June, September-October

  • Cheapest visit period:
    April-May, mid-late October


3 Paros: fewer people, an incredible atmosphere

Paros is an ideal island destination for travelers looking for incredible ambiance, nightlife and architecture, and to experience beauty in a less crowded location. The island is full of charm – thanks to the beautiful beaches, luxury hotels, clear waters, lively beach bars and calm bays there. One of the most famous beaches on the island is Kolymbithres, with its picturesque white rock formations worth exploring.

  • Best time to visit:
    April-October

  • Cheapest visit period:
    January-April, September 10 to December 9

2 Zakynthos: for nature lovers and nightlife enthusiasts

Home to the famous Navagio (shipwreck) beach, Zakynthos is one of the most visited islands in Greece, thanks to its spectacular scenery and incredible beaches with fine sand and turquoise waters. Bordered by flourishing pine trees and a verdant natural landscape, this place is perfect for adventurers. The island is known to be a playground for young people in their twenties – and is incredibly impressive for nature lovers and travelers wishing to discover its beautiful stone villages and Venetian castles.

  • Best time to visit:
    March to May, September to early December

  • Cheapest visit period:
    July


1 Ios: For Incredible Sunset Views

Attracting thousands of visitors every year, Ios is one of Greece’s most popular destinations. Famous for its picturesque beaches and lively scene, this island is best suited to young people. Besides its vibrant nightlife, Ios has so much more to offer, from sparkling waters to beaches to beautiful clifftop villages and more! One can easily reach this place by ferry from the ports of Athens or Rafina or Piraeus.

  • Best time to explore:
    June-mid September

  • Cheapest visit period:
    End of September

The beautiful Greek island 3 hours from London where Bruce Willis has a vacation home

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Looking for your next summer vacation destination? How about a beautiful Greek island where Hollywood star Bruce Willis vacationed?

Just three hours from London is beautiful Corfu. The legendary Die Hard actor loves it so much he reportedly bought a house there.

Corfu is in the Ionian Sea, just off the coast of Greece. It is particularly known for its beautiful beaches and as a party destination in the village of Kavos.

READ MORE: The beautiful city less than 2 hours from London where beer is 3 times cheaper than in the UK



Paleokastritsa is home to incredibly picture-perfect beaches

Bruce Willis is said to regularly vacation on the island of Corfu after buying a house there many years ago. The entire coast of the Greek paradise is dotted with amazing beaches, one of the most popular resorts being Paleokastritsa.

The beautiful village is in the northwest of the island and in mythology it is said to be the place where the Greek king Odysseus landed and first met Princess Nausicaa. Paleokastritsa is perfectly picturesque and home to adults-only and family-friendly hotels.

Rated a huge 4.5 stars on Tripadvisor, visitors say Paleokastritsa Beach is “one of the most beautiful beaches on the island”, with “crystal clear waters” that are “ideal for swimming”. It is also home to a beautiful blue lagoon that visitors describe as “magical”.



Visit Corfu Old Town to explore amazing history and architecture

A popular activity to do in the area is visiting the monastery of Paleokastritsa, high on a hill above the beach with an impressive view of the sea. There you can explore the museum, light a candle in the amazing church and see the traditional olive oil press in operation.

To the west of the island is the charming old town of Corfu. Listed as a Unesco World Heritage, it is home to immense Venetian architecture, an old 15C fortress. and many more fantastic historical sites. It is worth a visit for its incredible buildings, charming markets and sea views.

Kavos, in the southeast of the island, has long been a popular destination for young holidaymakers with a lively nightlife. The seaside village is home to a strip of clubs and bars, various water activities and plenty of cafes and restaurants perfect for curing a holiday hangover.

According to office metCorfu has an average daily high temperature of 29.2°C in June, 32°C in July and 32.3°C in August before dropping to 27.3°C in September.

According at Tripadvisor, the best restaurant to eat in Paleokastritsa is the Greek and Mediterranean spot, Il Pozzo. Rated five stars, reviewers say, “This is a must if in the area. Excellent food and service with stunning views of the sea below.”

Another happy diner said: “Not a single fault! Polite and friendly service, ordered 4 starters and 2 mains, boom of flavours, everything prepared to the smallest detail, lovely atmosphere, music…can’t wait to be back! Thank you!”

Throughout the island of Corfu, Tripadvisor lists Roda Park Restaurant as the best place to eat. The Greek restaurant is located in the north of the island in the village of Roda.

Rated 4.5 stars, the restaurant is famous for its legendary Greek night, with many calling the family owners “very nice”, “hilarious” and “welcoming”. Reviews say Roda Park is “Amazing authentic Greek food so this is a must visit restaurant. The food is just amazing. A family run business who are so welcoming and make the experience even better. Greek night is worth a visit and better than most with the can’t-miss plate breaker.”

London has it all – the best nightlife, food, drink, events, markets, everything!

But how do you stay on top? Our weekly What’s On, Going Out Out newsletter explains how.

You’ll receive a fully curated newsletter with the most exciting stories, reviews, previews and more – including original content – every week.

And the best piece? It’s completely FREE.

All you have to do is sign up for Going Out Out here.

How to get there

You can get to Corfu from Luton in three hours. There are also frequent flights from Gatwick to the island which take around three hours and ten minutes.

It’s worth checking out the best airports to find the most convenient trip to the Greek paradise.

Are you going to enjoy the sun in Corfu this summer?

Do you have a story you think we should cover? If so, please email [email protected]news or [email protected]

Chicago Drill Rapper FBG Cash Shot and Killed at 31

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Chicago exercise legend FBG Cash was fatally shot on Friday.

According ABC7 news in Chicago, police found the victim, a 31-year-old rapper, real name Tristian Hamilton, dead of gunshot wounds while in his car.

The Cook County Administration Office released very few details of the incident, only confirming that a man and woman were sitting in their car when a lone, unidentified gunman pulled up in a sedan black four-door, got out and opened fire on the pair before getting back into the sedan and escaping.

The victim, a 29-year-old woman, is in critical condition at Advocate Medical Center. She was shot in the left arm and upper back.

Police also confirmed that FBG Cash received multiple shots to his body as he was the intended target. He was eventually pronounced dead at the same hospital where his partner was taken.

No arrests have been made so far, but fans of the rapper reacted to news of his death on social media on Friday. The rapper is well known as a member of Chicago’s Fly Boy Gang [FBG] crew, also called Clout Boyz or “tooka gang”.

FBG rappers include Lil Jay, Wooski, Billionaire Black, Young Mello, FBG Dutchie, and the late FBG Duck, who was similarly killed off in 2020.

Many of the reactions surrounding the rapper’s death focus on the ongoing feud between the Tooka Gang and O Block. A few months ago, FBG Cash released a diss song in which he references one of their members, Tooka being “smoked” and proceeds to diss rapper O Block King Von.

“I don’t wanna go to the club no more, niggas left in the dirt…I can’t even get his lick back.”

Meanwhile, there are unconfirmed rumors from Chicago YouTubers who claim the rapper was framed by another woman and tried to escape the offender. He was chased down and shot and received wounds to his legs, upper body and throat.

Police haven’t confirmed any gangs responsible for the rapper’s murder, only saying that area two detectives are investigating.

Why Greece is a booming market for buying a summer home

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With its 6,000 islands and islets, most of all A Mediterranean country, Greece offers a tantalizing array of ppostcard-worthy pensions against the cerulean waters of the Aegean and Ionian seas. “Cosmopolitan way of life from Mykonos and Paros to laid-back Paxos and Folegandros, there’s an island to satisfy the discerning buyer,” says Savvas Savvaidis, President and CEO of Greece Sotheby’s International Realty. “Foreign customers have seen Greece as a haven of peace, an ideal location that offers seclusion in vast spaces of unequaled beauty.

Listed by Greece Sotheby’s International Realty, this beachfront villa on the Greek island of Paros puts a modern twist on Cycladic architecture. Photo: Courtesy of Greece Sothebys International Realty

Part of the attraction – in addition to the country’s natural splendor, pleasant climate and rich ancient architecture –are favorable tax laws as well as its popular “golden visa” program. Adopted in 2013 to make property more attractive to non-EU citizens, it allows the buyer of any real estate transaction over €250,000, or approximately $263,000, to qualify for Greek residency. “These policies have been useful to bring wealthy individuals to Greece,” explains Yannis Ploumis, General Manager of Ploumis Sotiropoulos Real Estate, a subsidiary of Christie’s International Real Estate.

“Foreign clients have seen Greece as an ideal location that offers seclusion in vast spaces of unparalleled beauty”

savva savvaidis

It also doesn’t hurt that the nation is considered relatively underpriced compared to its Mediterranean neighbors, offering an equally sybaritic setting at a much lower cost. Indeed, the fragile economy was sadly slow to find its footing in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis and the house price index is still a quarter below its levels of that year, according to the Bank. from Greece.

Sotheby’s is selling this $13.2 million estate in Crete. Photo: Courtesy of Greece Sothebys International Realty

Such conditions have created a surprisingly resilient environment housing market, with a 76% jump in foreign investment from 2020 to 2021. “Due to limited supply, properties are becoming increasingly scarce, especially on the seafront,” notes Savvaidis. “Athens, Mykonos, Paros, Corfu and Crete are the most sought-after regions, while lesser known destinations, such as Paxos, Tinos, Ithica, Syros and Folegandros are also experiencing an increase in demand, mainly because of their authentic and discreet character.

Sotheby’s announces this $1.7 million house in Tinos. Photo: Courtesy of Greece Sothebys International Realty

However, non-Greeks should be aware of many things, starting with the fact that for many years it was the only country in Europe without a real cadastre – and the government delayed the full implementation of one until 2024. The the resulting patchwork of data highlights the importance of build a local team to ensure that there are no competing claims to a plot. “Foreign buyers must understand that the procedure to conclude a sale is relatively long,” adds Ploumis. “They need to hire a lawyer, notary and engineer who will do the due diligence so the transaction can go through safely and smoothly.” But, he says, given the benefits, the investment is worth it: “At the end of the day, owning a home in Greece is a constant source of pleasure.

A version of this article first appeared in our Summer 2022 issue under the title “Greek Life”. Subscribe to the magazine.

Cover: An $11.4 million home in Mykonos, for sale at Christie’s International Real Estate.

Photo: Courtesy of Ploumis Sotiropoulos Real Estate

Turkey’s Erdogan says he will stand for election next year

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ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan confirmed Thursday that he plans to run again next year.

Erdogan, 68, made the announcement during a speech in the Aegean coastal city of Izmir, where he challenged the leader of the main opposition party, Kemal Kilicdaroglu, to announce the candidate who would challenge him on behalf of an alliance of opposition parties.

“(Recep) Tayyip Erdogan is the People’s Alliance candidate,” Erdogan said, referring to the opposition between his Justice and Development Party and a nationalist party. “If you have the courage, declare your candidacy or the candidate of the alliance.”

Turkey is expected to hold presidential and legislative elections by June 2023 at the latest.

Erdogan ruled the country for nearly 20 years, first as prime minister and then as president. But support for him and the People’s Alliance has steadily declined amid high inflation and a cost of living crisis.

Kilicdaroglu led the opposition to victory in the 2019 municipal elections, when his mayoral candidates toppled the ruling party in Istanbul, Turkey’s largest city, and the capital, Ankara.

The opposition party alliance has yet to announce its presidential candidate, although Kilicdaroglu and the mayors of Ankara and Istanbul are seen as the main contenders.

The Hidden Greek Retreat 007 Would Love

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“Sit under this tree and listen to the rustling of the oak leaves,” suggests my guide Constantin Vergos after leading me into a valley hidden by a horseshoe of high mountains. “Perhaps your future will be foretold.”

He brought me to Dodona, where for centuries pilgrims have come to consult a dying divine aunt, Dione the earth mother, seeking answers to the practical dilemmas of everyday life. She was later joined and supplanted by her male counterpart Zeus as the senior god at the oldest known oracle site in the ancient world, second in fame only to Delphi.

Tablets found in this sanctuary, and now on display in the Archaeological Museum of Ioannina, reveal the questions that preoccupied the faithful camping in the sacred grove (“Hermon asks which god he should pray to in order to obtain ‘useful’ offspring from Kretaia, a anxious father writes). Exactly how the mortals of Dodona received answers from the gods is up for debate, but all theories have a magical oak tree at their heart. Some say communication came through the whispers of its leaves in the breeze, others say the answers were sung by musical wind chimes hanging from the branches. Priests were on hand to translate and interpret the messages of the gods, a service that drew vast crowds.

Around 290 BC. BC, King Pyrrhus, the great general and ruler of Epirus, ordered the construction of a magnificent amphitheatre, athletics stadium and temple complex in Dodona, with festivals of music, theater and sports for those completing the journey to the Sacred Valley. and its oracular tree. This once meditative place offering a tranquil connection to mother earth has become a cross between Lourdes and Disneyland.

A distant relative of the sacred oak stands today among the ruins of the temples and the well-preserved theater still has snow-capped Mount Tomaros as its glorious backdrop. The old energies of this site feel intensely present as I attempt to guess the message from the rustling leaves. “Lunch”, I hear them say. “Lunch.”

The prophetic tree guides me towards the eel carpaccio and the organic trout fillet, tasted while surveying the freshwater lake where the fish grew up. I’m in the Frontzu Politia restaurant perched in Ioannina, overlooking Lake Pamvotida, with its unnamed island. What it has are seven monasteries and a museum in memory of Ali Pasha, a character who could have been the inspiration for a number of Bond villains.

Sail a 12-night Iceland and Ireland itinerary aboard Celebrity Apex from $274 per person, per night

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If you are a lover of art, history and culture, there is nothing better than a European vacation and Celebrity Cruises have curated some of the most inspiring itineraries to transport you to a different world where you can indulge your interests on every cobbled street.

Celebrity Cruises in Norway

Celebrity, the premium cruise line where drinks, WiFi and resort fees are Always included on their crossings, has selected five best voyages for your next European vacation with prices as attractive as $274 per person per night for a 12-night stay in Iceland and Ireland on board Celebrity Summit.

The cruise will visit six cities including Cork, Waterford, Belfast, Reykjavik and Akureyri and will depart Amsterdam on August 1 this year with prices starting at $3,295 per person – up from $6,076.

Over 12 nights, you’ll experience the magnificence of Iceland’s natural wonders, surrounded by the comforts of a world-class resort aboard your ship. You can bathe in the mineral-rich waters of the Blue Lagoon and discover the incomparable beauty of the northern island. After your shore excursion, you can return to the ship and wrap yourself in Celebrity’s eXhale cashmere bedding and mattress for a restful sleep, ready for another day of adventure.

Summit You’ll also spend the night in Reykjavik, known for its fresh seafood, eclectic food scene, and artsy shopping. To book, click here.

If you fancy throwing belated Queen’s Jubilee celebrations and heading to the British Isles, Celebrity offers a 10-night cruise to explore the towering White Cliffs of Dover and uncover the legends of Blarney Castle in Cork. You can sip a pint of beer at the Guinness Storehouse in Dublin, shop in Liverpool and explore the castles and ancient ruins of Belfast. The 10-night British Isles cruise on board Celebrity Summit will cost $301 per person per night and will leave Amsterdam on September 1 this year. That equates to $3,012 per person — down from $5,480 — for the 10-night vacation. To book click here.

Celebrity Cruises in Santorini

The line also offers a seven-night itinerary to Italy and the Greek islands with prices starting at $2,123 per person – up from $3,593 – on board Celebrity benefit departure from Rome on September 3. To start your vacation, be sure to visit the Sistine Chapel and the Colosseum in Rome before boarding the ship to sail to Naples, Santorini, Rhodes, Mykonos, and Naples. In Rhodes, stroll the cobbled streets of the quaint Old Town and soak in the azure Aegean Sea in Mykonos as you visit the island’s famous Elia Beach. Sip a cocktail at the Sunset Bar on the roof of the ship while watching the most spectacular sunset on Santorini. To book click here.

Rooftop sunset bar

If you’ve always wanted to experience the incredible Norwegian fjords, the line offers a wonderful nine-night Norway cruise on board Celebrity Summit w UNESCO World Heritage Site, and enjoy stunning mountain views aboard the scenic Flam Railway. The trip will visit Oslo, Geiranger, Olden, Flam and Bergen. To book, click here.

Dubrovnik

One of the line’s most popular itineraries is the eight-night cruise to Italy, Croatia and Montenegro onboard Celebrity Beyond where you can soak up the atmosphere of the terracotta roofs of Dubrovnik, explore the medieval monuments of Kotor and swim in the turquoise waters of Corfu and the white sand beaches of Zakynthos. In Naples, visit the nearby ruins of Pompeii and the glamorous island of Capri. Prices for the cruise that calls at six ports start at $2,776 per person — down from $5,004 — and depart Rome on May 7, 2023. To book, click here.

You will be blown away by the sheer size of Eden over three levels with its onboard cafe, restaurant and bar Celebrity Beyond which made its Mediterranean debut in April. There is also the rooftop garden, the adult-only Solarium pool, and the main pool surrounded by the outdoor pool deck.

Celebrity prides itself on making vacations as easy as possible with drinks, Wi-Fi and resort fees Always included.

No relief for backpack carriers as court denies claim for Pacific Island money transfer companies’ bank accounts

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  • A legal review brought by companies that help people transfer money to the Pacific Islands at low prices has failed.
  • Without a bank account, remittance senders operate through cash payments, a practice they say is both expensive and dangerous.
  • The High Court said the Reserve Bank’s powers to run banks were based on a threat to financial stability or fears that banks were not being prudent enough – which was not the case here.

A judicial review of the actions of the Reserve Bank and Finance Minister Grant Robertson over money laundering laws has failed, leaving money senders ‘always on the lookout’: anti-money laundering laws money have made money transfers to the Pacific “unsafe”

* What happened when $2.7 million arrived in a backpack

* Anti-money laundering compliance costs too much, too many supervisors

* Transferring money to the Pacific is expensive, despite New Zealand’s efforts to cut costs

“> carrying bags of cash in an effort to keep the practice of low-cost money transfer alive.

Pacific remittance companies have been left without bank accounts thanks to how banks have interpreted their anti-money laundering responsibilities.

Authorities in the United States and Europe have adopted guidelines to protect senders from the reach of anti-money laundering legislation, seeing them as a crucial lifeline for developing countries.

However, such exclusions have not been made in New Zealand.

READ MORE:
* ‘Always on the lookout’: anti-money laundering laws have made money transfers to the Pacific ‘unsafe’
* What happened when $2.7 million arrived in a backpack
* Anti-money laundering compliance costs too much, too many supervisors
* Transferring money to the Pacific is expensive, despite New Zealand’s efforts to cut costs

In April, shippers sued the Reserve Bank and Finance Minister Grant Robertson in an attempt to get them to order New Zealand banks to grant them bank accounts.

Money senders say having to negotiate in cash makes the process of transferring money to the Pacific expensive and dangerous.

Chris McKeen / Stuff

Money senders say having to negotiate in cash makes the process of transferring money to the Pacific expensive and dangerous.

In a decision on Wednesday, the High Court found that the Reserve Bank’s power to issue instructions to banks necessitated a threat to the efficiency or stability of the financial system, or fear that banks were not being prudent enough .

Judge David Gendall said none of these criteria were met in the event remittance senders were denied bank accounts.

“I agree that failure to provide service to an industrial class is not serious enough to warrant the use of executive power and that such failure on the part of banks does not amount to reckless conduct of business. “

Other claims by senders were also dismissed, including that the Reserve Bank did not offer bank accounts to senders as the banking system’s “lender of last resort” and that the Reserve Bank had misinterpreted its role by report to a supervisor under the Anti-Money Laundering and Combating the Financing of Terrorism (AML-FT) Act.

In a May 2020 letter, Robertson advised remittances that they needed an audit report or a report from an AML-CFT supervisor to be granted bank accounts.

The senders argued they did not need it and alleged that Robertson erred in law in reaching that conclusion, but Judge Gendall said that in publishing the letter Robertson exercised no legal power subject to judicial review.

The High Court said Finance Minister Grant Robertson had not made a decision subject to judicial review in relation to shippers.

ROBERT KITCHIN/Stuff

The High Court said Finance Minister Grant Robertson had not made a decision subject to judicial review in relation to shippers.

Judge Gendall admitted that the Reserve Bank could have raised the issue of “general risk reduction” with the Coordinating Committee, a committee set up to ensure consistency in AML-CFT supervision, but said Nothing in the law required it.

“I also accept that the Reserve Bank has undertaken important projects in other respects to address the problem of overall risk reduction itself, including the [Pacific Remittance Project].”

CompliancePlus director Uddhav Kirtikar, who helped the remittance companies with their case, said the High Court’s decision was “a setback for sure”, but the remittance companies involved were considering appeal the decision.

Remittance companies are a lifeline to the Pacific, contributing significant sums to the economies of countries like Samoa and Tonga at levels that exceed foreign aid inflows.

In Tonga, remittances accounted for 38% of the country’s GDP in 2020.

Money transfer companies perform such money transfers at low cost. But without bank accounts, these businesses have been forced to use cash in recent years, making the process more expensive and dangerous.

Remittance senders are reporting entities, so they must comply with AML-CFT regulations independently.

But when they make irregular deposits and transfers to their bank accounts to support money transfers between New Zealand and the Pacific, these transactions are identified as AML-CFT risks by banks.

An owner of a money transfer company, who will not be named, said he was scared and ‘always on the lookout’ because not having a bank account meant he had to collect money by hand, then walking around parts of Auckland with thousands of dollars in his backpack. .

Robert Bell says he considered using ships to transfer money to the Pacific when banks started closing bank accounts.

PROVIDED

Robert Bell says he considered using ships to transfer money to the Pacific when banks started closing bank accounts.

KlickEx Pacific managing director Robert Bell at one point said his company consulted the Royal New Zealand Navy about piracy risks and nearly bought two decommissioned warships so they could physically transfer silver. money safely across the ocean, all of which was necessary because his business had been “unbanked”, although this decision was later reversed.

In 2019, the Reserve Bank launched its Pacific Remittance Project to keep banking services alive in the Pacific.

The bank warned that “the tide is receding on international banking services for Pacific island nations, which could make it more difficult and expensive to trade, invest and send money”, a fate it pinned on AML-CFT requirements worldwide.

Between 2011 and 2019, the decline in cross-border banking relationships in Polynesia and Melanesia was double the decline seen elsewhere in the world.

Reserve Bank Governor Adrian Orr also issued a statement last year warning banks against general risk reduction and said money transfers to the Pacific were low risk.

NZ Bankers Association chief executive Roger Beaumont has previously said that when it comes to remittance senders, banks look at AML-CFT risks on a case-by-case basis.

Turkey calls on Greece to withdraw troops from Aegean islands

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ANKARA — Turkey on Tuesday called on Greece to withdraw its armed forces from the Aegean islands, warning that Ankara will challenge the status of the islands if it fails to demilitarize them.

Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu told a joint press conference with his North Macedonian counterpart that Greece had established a military presence on the Aegean islands in violation of the 1923 Treaty of Lausanne and of the 1947 Treaty of Paris. He said the islands were ceded to Greece on the condition that they remain demilitarized.

“The agreements are there but Greece is violating them. It’s arming them. If Greece does not put an end to this violation, the sovereignty of the islands will be brought into question,” he said. “It’s as clear as that. You will respect the agreements.

Greece argues that Turkey has deliberately misinterpreted treaties regarding armed forces on its eastern islands and claims it has legal grounds to defend itself following hostile actions by Ankara, including a threat of war for a long time if it extends its territorial waters.

The Turkish minister’s comments come amid a further escalation of tensions between NATO allies who have a history of disputes over a range of issues, including mineral exploration in the eastern Mediterranean and rival claims in the Aegean Sea.

Last month, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said he would stop speaking to Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis, expressing his displeasure with the Greek leader’s comments during a recent trip to the United States, including suggestions that Congress should block Turkey’s acquisition of F-16 fighter jets.

In Athens, Mitsotakis said restraint was needed on both sides of the Aegean because of the war in Ukraine.

“I think we are still very far from that point, far from the tension we had in the summer of 2020,” Mitsotakis said in reference to a time when tensions erupted between Greece and Turkey over rights. gas exploration in the Eastern Mediterranean.

“Today everyone must show restraint. Especially at a time when we are facing a very big challenge in NATO with the Russian invasion of Ukraine. We must be united,” he said. -he declares.

Cavusoglu said Ankara had sent two letters to the United Nations on the issue of militarized islands and he called on Greece to respond to the letters.

“They get aggressive because they can’t respond to letters,” the minister said.

How to convince an outgoing that Brexit was a bad idea? Make them line up | Zoe Williams

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I I hate the phrase ‘the architects of Brexit’, partly because I still yearn for an alternative world in which Brexit disappears as a word and concept, and partly because to say it has ‘architects’ attributes a certain degree of structural solidity to it. t own. However, there is a man, Daniel Hannan, who has embarked on this project of disintegration since his student days, so let’s call him one of his architects. write in the telegraph, he said casually that it would have been easier for all of us if we had stayed in the single market. Tell you what would have been helpful, mate: saying that with any force between 2016 and 2019, when it might have changed or meant something. That’s how fanatics are – there’s no point in trying to hold them to account or ask about their brass necks. They’ll chase you off a cliff and gently ask why you didn’t remember to pack your parachute.

Still, it’s hard to get that familiar bitter taste of injustice out of your mouth. Hannan is authorized to say this, since from him it is original, even new; when a staunch supporter of this idiotic plan says it may have gone too far, that’s news, folks. If any of us said it, it would be repetitive, predictable, irrelevant—a faux pas, even, like telling strangers how many push-ups you can do or the time you dreamed about a fox.

When a starter is stuck in a queue at Málaga airport for three hours, while his EU counterparts sneak in and grab all the best rental cars, they are allowed to curse the forces of bureaucracy, but if any remaining did, we’d be moaning again. While the titans of the airline industry – Michael O’Leary of Ryanair, Steve Heapy of Jet2 – blame the chaotic scenes at airports and stranded passengers on the combined forces of Brexit, the odd Tory asshole will go through a denial by heart, but their heart is not really in it. Their voices sound a little tired and you know the day will come when they’ll shrug their shoulders and say, “Maybe that wasn’t such a good idea after all. Maybe we should go back to the drawing board, start with a small, lightweight customs union. Well, it’s not that difficult, is it? And when, so choked with outrage that we can’t even breathe, let alone formulate words, we are reduced to waving our disapproval, our Brexit lords will turn around, all innocent, and say “Isn’t that what you said you wanted? Politicians who can admit they made a mistake? »

It was always going to be an overseas vacation where the climax of reality hit the hot air balloon to regain control. The nightmare for EU citizens trying to figure out how to stay in the UK and whether to even care is a private matter, played out in individual households. Staff shortages, supply chain issues, even port congestion, can all be categorized as “other people’s problems”, at least for a while. Airports, however – families at Gatwick have their long-awaited trip to Corfu canceled with 15 minutes’ notice speaking to their disappointment over radio calls; students stuck in Mykonos; the border lines that a thousand people will use the last 4% of their phone’s battery to post on Instagram – are too easily dramatized moments. No amount of rhetoric can erase them, and sooner or later there will be reverse browsing everywhere.

Looking back, I wish we had fought the whole EU referendum campaign over the hassle of it all. A little less “Project Fear”, a little more “Project Ball-ache”. Is this really what you want, for you, for your descendants? No more administration, no more queues, no more gigantic pains in your neck? Is anything worth it? We could have responded to every lofty soliloquy about “global Britain” with a half-raised eyebrow and a calm: “You know what sovereignty really means? It means waiting for things and filling out forms. It means doing your least favorite things in life, a lot more often.

Well, at least we’ll know better for next time.

Zoe Williams is a Guardian columnist

Inside Laura Whitmore’s huge net worth, including £600,000 salary from Love Island

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Laura Whitmore is back on screens for Love Island 2022 after a long and highly anticipated wait.

The 37-year-old host showed off her trip to Spain at the start of the first episode.

This season will be her third year of presenting after debuting in 2020 and there has been a lot of talk about how much she gets paid for it.

Previous reports said Laura was set to earn £500,000 for this series.

According The sunthe mother-of-one won £600,000 for hosting Love Island in 2021, despite not featuring in every episode.



Laura Whitmore has hosted Love Island since 2020

Networthpost reports that Laura’s net worth is $15m, or £11.9m. While she hosted Love Island and Aftersun for two years, she also had other stints.

Laura began her career as a presenter at MTV Ireland before moving on to I’m a Celebrity…Get Me Out of Here! NOW! and the Hot Desk.

Although known for her presentations, the blonde beauty starred in the 2020 film, Sadhbh, where she played Claire, a struggling mother. She also wrote the film alongside director Arjun Rose.

Just recently, Laura responded to criticism over how much she could earn from her showcase gig on Love Island.



Much has been said about the income of the host of the show
Much has been said about the income of the host of the show



Laura shared some of the criticism she has received since hosting the hit ITV2 dating show
Laura shared some of the criticism she has received since hosting the hit ITV2 dating show

At the start of the video, Laura could be seen sipping on an official Love Island water bottle before pointing above her head to text that read, “Let’s talk about Love Island” followed by a red heart emoji.

She made a face when the words, ‘Laura has the easiest job on TV! She gets paid £50,000 a minute. It’s an outrage’, flashed across the screen.

Laura smiled as she pointed to her response, which read, “First, Iain never cared about the money he makes. Why don’t we like women making money?”

She went on to tell viewers, “It’s all real stuff that was written or said,” followed by a silly face emoji.